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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED
BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP


Two of Joseph Conrad's most compelling and haunting works, in which the deepest perceptions and desires of the human heart and mind are explored.

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:
A concise introduction that gives readers important background information
A chronology of the author's life and work
A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context
An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations
Detailed explanatory notes
Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work
Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction
A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.
SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON
Published: Pocket Books on May 1, 2004
ISBN: 9781416503019
List price: $4.95
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my best frends mum just got a nearly new Mazda MAZDA3 Hatchback only from working part-time off a pc at home... go to this web-site >> T­­­­­­­i­­­­­­­m­­­­­­­e­­­­­­­-­­­­­­­J­­­­­­­o­­­­­­­b­­­­­­­s­­­­­­­3­­­­­­­4­­­­­­.c­­­­o­­­­mread more
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This is a great standard for classical English literature collections. Dark, descriptive, and lathed with the racial prejudices of the period of European colonial expansion, this tale provides a vivid narrative of the Belgian occupation of the heart of Africa.read more
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This is the first piece of Literature I have ever read by Joseph Conrad, an author I've been meaning to pick up since, oh, probably sixth or seventh grade when he was mentioned in another book I was reading (don't remember what now). The Secret Sharer is the first-person narrative of a new Captain as he comes across a man floating in the water next to his ship. He brings the man on board, clothes him and hides him, until the man (the captain's 'double') drives the Captain to distraction. This would be longer, but I would probably end up giving away plot which would be unfortunate...and the story was only about sixty pages long. Normally I am not a fan of first-person narratives, the excessive and exclusive use of the pronoun 'I' tends to bother me deeply. This short story (novella?), however, manages to not be grating as such. First of all, the focus is largely on the Captain's 'double' as he told his story and they decided what was to be done with him. Somehow, though not necessarily an easy read, I was perpetually engaged by the story. Much of it was back story and interpersonal; nothing was outstandingly witty or terrifying. It was entirely straightforward and simple. Perhaps I am a reader that puts myself into the text, absorbing it as part of my own consciousness. Or perhaps it is Conrad's style that I find to be absorbing. Who knows? I plan to read Heart of Darkness in the very near future, so maybe I can decide then. For now, I will end with a heart-felt recomendation. The Secret Sharer is good stuff. read more
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my best frends mum just got a nearly new Mazda MAZDA3 Hatchback only from working part-time off a pc at home... go to this web-site >> T­­­­­­­i­­­­­­­m­­­­­­­e­­­­­­­-­­­­­­­J­­­­­­­o­­­­­­­b­­­­­­­s­­­­­­­3­­­­­­­4­­­­­­.c­­­­o­­­­m
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a great standard for classical English literature collections. Dark, descriptive, and lathed with the racial prejudices of the period of European colonial expansion, this tale provides a vivid narrative of the Belgian occupation of the heart of Africa.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the first piece of Literature I have ever read by Joseph Conrad, an author I've been meaning to pick up since, oh, probably sixth or seventh grade when he was mentioned in another book I was reading (don't remember what now). The Secret Sharer is the first-person narrative of a new Captain as he comes across a man floating in the water next to his ship. He brings the man on board, clothes him and hides him, until the man (the captain's 'double') drives the Captain to distraction. This would be longer, but I would probably end up giving away plot which would be unfortunate...and the story was only about sixty pages long. Normally I am not a fan of first-person narratives, the excessive and exclusive use of the pronoun 'I' tends to bother me deeply. This short story (novella?), however, manages to not be grating as such. First of all, the focus is largely on the Captain's 'double' as he told his story and they decided what was to be done with him. Somehow, though not necessarily an easy read, I was perpetually engaged by the story. Much of it was back story and interpersonal; nothing was outstandingly witty or terrifying. It was entirely straightforward and simple. Perhaps I am a reader that puts myself into the text, absorbing it as part of my own consciousness. Or perhaps it is Conrad's style that I find to be absorbing. Who knows? I plan to read Heart of Darkness in the very near future, so maybe I can decide then. For now, I will end with a heart-felt recomendation. The Secret Sharer is good stuff. 
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Although they are never directly addressed, the wounds inflicted by Leopold's rape of the Congo are visible everywhere, and for that reason alone, it is worth reading. The whole journey into the darkness of the human soul, too, of course. Appropriate reading for anyone.
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The introduction is really interesting. I did not know Joseph Conrad...a great "English" writer was really Polish. His name is really Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski. Wow, huh? That and he didn't really learn the English language until he was twenty. His books, well at least these two, have real moral and psychological undertones. I love that.Heart of DarknessPublished in 1902, Heart of Darkness begins the story on a ship leaving London. Marlow, one of the English passengers on the ship tells a story of when he was a Captain of a boat in the Congo doing Ivory trading. He is given the task of going down the Congo River to retrieve a fellow ivory trader, Kurtz, who has quite the reputation in the region.While the writing is very very wordy (the introduction even notes that), the imagery is very strong. He depicts the horrible conditions of the slaves in the area. And when he finally does meet Kurtz, the absolute lack of humanity in him is just...well plain scary. And that's when it gets sort of into the psychological aspect of the story. I mean Kurtz is a horrible trader who will do anything to get more ivory. I mean the guy has heads on stakes around his place. Just as a warning. But Kurtz has presence. Just pure evil genius. And Marlow actually starts to admire him. Not admire what he does or did but just the genius of it all. It really confronts that idea of the ability of everyone to be or do evil. Kind of like in World War II...how do regular people end up doing horrific things? Even the title of the story, Heart of Darkness is a psychological twist. Africa used to be called the "Dark Continent" but it's really about the darkness of the human heart.The Secret SharerThis short story, published in 1910, was a bit more straight forward than Heart of Darkness but still pretty good. The story is about a newbie Captain of a ship. He really hasn't gotten to know his crew or his ship. While he on watch during the night, he finds a naked man hanging onto the ladder of his ship in the water. He takes the man on board, hides him in his cabin, and learns his story. The man is named Leggatt and is from the ship, Sephora, which is nearby. During a horrible storm, Leggatt, in a fit of rage, killed a fellow shipmate because Leggatt thought the shipmate was being lax in his duties. He escaped punishment by diving in the water, feigning drowning and hiding.So the Captain actually sides with this guy! He hides him, lies to his crew, and lies to the Sephora Captain. He even goes as far as to call this guy "his other self"...I mean he really identifies more with this murderer than with anyone else. Kind of crazy.Conclusion:I'll have to read more Joseph Conrad. I love the psychological/moral twist in these stories. They really make me ponder things long after I've read them. And I love that Joseph Conrad actually went to these places since he worked in the French and British Merchant Navies. It makes me wonder how much of his stories he took from real life...which is kind of scary.
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3/20 Quite enjoyed this one - thought it would be much tougher than it was. The introduction was lovely (although I have a MUCH older version, so I didn't read Oates) - it got me in the right mindset.Starting with "The Secret Sharer" was also good, as it got me accustomed to Conrad's style and psychology - not that you can ever fully understand it! But in any case "Heart of Darkness" would have been a hit. It's...absolutely haunting. Conrad is brilliant in how much he lets us know about Kurtz - or how little - because it allows us to put our own interpretations on him. He's a fascinating character. The theme of nightmares is also quite prevelant - the idea that neither of the two sides of imperialism we see - Kurtz and the company - are good, but only two versions of nightmares, of which Marlowe must choose one. It's powerful precisely because there is no redemption to be found. The concept of the alien - of the alien continent, as it were - pervades the novel. It's hard to tell if colonialism and imperialism are dealt with fully - we only get one side of the coin (meaning that the criticism comes only from the white europeans, and africans are denied a voice and identity in the novel). However, that may be by design, through Conrad's dealing with alienation.As usual, very disjointed review.
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