• book

From the Publisher

Anger is usually a normal human emotion. However, it can be one of the most insidious forms of violence when it gets out of control. It can also lead to problems at work, in personal relationships and in the overall quality of life. Uncontrolled anger takes control of the mind and places one at the mercy of an unpredictable and powerful emotion. Expressing angry feelings in an assertive manner is the healtiest way. To achieve this, one must learn what one's needs are and how to meet them without hurting others. Being assertive literally means being respectful of yourself and others. Anger Management is a learned behaviour. The objective is to reduce both the emotional triggers as well as the physiological arousal that anger causes. We cannot avoid the things or people or situations which enrage us. Nor can we change them. But what we can do, is to learn how to effectively control our own reactions to them.

Published: Leadstart Publishing Pvt Ltd on
ISBN: 9789384027025
List price: $4.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Anger: Managing The Volcano Within
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Entrepreneur
2 min read
Psychology

3 Strategies for Dealing With Toxic People

"Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing," Ralph Waldo Emerson once mused. It's a solid observation about handling interactions with difficult people. Mark Goulston, a Los Angeles-based business psychiatrist and consultant and author of Just Listen: Discover the Secret to Getting Through to Absolutely Anyone, says it's simple to deal with the bullies, the blamers, the rage-aholics, the whiners and the complainers. Here's how. Don't expect them to not be difficult. Once you've identified a difficult person, adjust your expectations so you're not blindsided by their acti
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Psychology

Don't Pop Your Top: 5 Thoughts to Keep You Calm in an Angry Moment

There are 10 or so moments in my career that make me wince when I think of them, and all but one involve a flash of anger. (The other one: an autocorrect in an email to my boss that turned an innocuous thought into “I lift you.”) There isn’t one moment at work in which I let my temper flare up that I don’t wish I could take back. Uncontrolled anger is always a mistake. It’s always regrettable. And it always reveals you to be weak even as you attempt to seem strong.  But you know this.  The problem is that when anger floods your head, the sticky note on your brain that says don’t let your tempe
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Personal Growth

The Ethics Coach on Managing a Sticky-Fingered Staff

Do you have an ethical dilemma? Write to The Ethics Coach at ethics@entrepreneur.com. Q: Employees at my restaurant are taking food home without paying for it and are not charging their friends for drinks. I made it clear that I'll fire people if the behavior continues, and I bought locks for the refrigerators. However, I remain angry. How do I trust my staff after this betrayal? A: Employees who help themselves to food (or office supplies) don't think they're stealing; they see such things as perks, something they've earned. Besides, nobody will miss a burger here or a pack of binder clips th