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Not your typical boring diet book, this is a tart-tongued, no-holds-barred wakeup call to all women who want to be thin. With such blunt advice as, "Soda is liquid Satan" and "You are a total moron if you think the Atkins Diet will make you thin," it's a rallying cry for all savvy women to start eating healthy and looking radiant. Unlike standard diet books, it actually makes the reader laugh out loud with its truthful, smart-mouthed revelations. Behind all the attitude, however, there's solid guidance. Skinny Bitch espouses a healthful lifestyle that promotes whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and encourages women to get excited about feeling "clean and pure and energized."

Topics: How-To Guides, Witty, Informative, Funny, Healthy Habits, and Food History

Published: Running Press on
ISBN: 9780762432752
List price: $13.95
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this book revealed a lot of nuances with my current diet. I'm a true believer now though and I'm sure Rory and Kim have done a good job leading me down the right path.....I recommend this book for anyone serious about getting skinny and dumping the self loathing that comes with being fatmore
These ladies really know their stuff! I love this book. It's hilarious, insightful, and it will change your life for the better.more
That is full of crap, false informations, misinformation. Be on any lobbying I would pursue for diffamation! Skinny? Sure but crazy too!more
Just an excuse to turn you into a vegan.more
It's a rude awakening , slap in the face but gets the point right across!! more
Great writing style - not the usual sweet nurturing tone. Liked the no nonsense tough love tongue in cheek style while still keeping anecdotes and references. My only concern about the pro-vegan lifestyle is the high consumption of soy products, prone to GMOs… does this not become just as harmful as animal by products?more
This is a really great book. I loved the writing style, it keeps you interested while giving you information about nutrition and eating habits. As a vegetarian, I agreed with the parts of the book about factory farming, but I found the vivid, graphic descriptions almost too much. Overall a really great book, I also love the menus and the resources that are included!more
At first I like the blunt and straight-forward style of the book, but after a while, the tone got tiresome, and I started looking forward to finishing the book. Some of the facts about the horrible state of the meat and dairy industry seemed extreme and sensational, trying to scare me into being a vegetarian when I already am one. I wish the authors had stuck to the health benefits vegetarianism and veganism, which I buy into better.

On the plus side, the book did give me some good ideas about attitude adjustment, and there are some good resources for books, websites, CDs and restaurant guides in the back.more
Poorly substantiated claims for the superiority of the vegan lifestyle wrapped in pseudo-hip profanity and sprinkled with Cosmo-girl emphasis. I found it simply awful on all fronts.more
This book was generally a load of crap. I feel absolutely cheated in reading this book.

I thought that this book was going to be a means of feeling empowered about food and body image. I thought it was going to be a guide to eating like all those "skinny bitches" many of us females see out there all the time. You know, the ones who pick listlessly at their grilled salmon and mixed greens while we chomp voraciously into our hamburgers? I wanted an insight into the way in which "skinny bitches" lead their lives and approach food, diet and exercise, since I think being skinny is more about mindset and behavior than necessarily about calorie intake or fat grams.

Instead, I got a 198 page rant, the main tagline of which was "Go Vegan, or else you will be fat and unhealthy forever." What utter tripe. I think the girls brought up some interesting (and horrifying) points about the meat packing industry and the danger of processed foods that many people consume on a daily basis, but I think it is manipulative (and ridiculous) to push the idea that the sole means of becoming healthy is by becoming vegan.

Furthermore, the girls barely discuss exercise and other means of getting healthy and their "motivational" language was insulting in the extreme. The idea of becoming a "skinny bitch" and adopting an in your face tone is one thing, but it is quite another to call you reader a "fat pig." Who do they think they are?

These girls come across as vapid, "Hollywood" dumb bitches who toss around some wikipedia level research in an attempt to push their ideas on the reader and adopt a superior, self righteous, holier than thou tone throughout. Only in the last pages do these authors try to whitewash their message with "love yourself" and "care about yourself" but at that point it's too late for me to feel anything but disgust with these stupid girls.

more
Ich habe das Buch via BookCrossing erhalten und relativ schnell gelesen. Es hat mich aber nicht begeistert. Die AutorInnen argumentieren mit flott und lustig, aber nicht in sich schlüssig. An einer Stelle wird vor Nahrungsmitteln mit Zusatzstoffen wie Vitaminen und Mineralstoffen gewarnt, einige Seiten später wird Reismilch mit Calzium und Vitamin A empfohlen. Ich finde es unnötige Propaganda Fleisch "kadaver" zu nennen, besonders weil die Autorinnen ohnehin gute Argumente bringen, warum man auf Fleisch verzichten sollte, wenn man dünn sein will.Das Argument "natürlich" wird recht willkürlich eingesetzt, um manche Lebensmittel für gut zu befinden und andere nicht. "Natürlichkeit" ist für mich aber kein Argument Gesundheitsschädlichkeit, Gesundheitsförderlichkeit, Umwelt- oder Ressourcenschonung sind für mich Argumente und nicht nur Polemik.more
Despite the title, this book is not really about getting skinny but getting healthy. Both the authors use a "tough-love" attitude that makes you laugh and makes you think. They tell you the truth about what the dairy and meat industries are up to, and explain what all those ingredients with the long words are. This book is very informative while being an interesting read. While the approved eating lists seemed less than comprehensive, there were quite a few good meal ideas on there. As a whole this is an eye-opening book that should be on everyone's reading list.more
I found the authors a little too obnoxious for my taste and I am not a vegan. Loved the title of the book, though.more
I found the authors a little too obnoxious for my taste and I am not a vegan. Loved the title of the book, though.more
There was such hype regarding this book. I don't know why I did not expect the tone inside based on the fact that the word b*tch is in the title. I found the language in the book to be inappropriate and unprofessional and detracting to their message. In fact, I couldn't get past the language to determine if their message had validity.more
Disclaimer: I'm already a vegan, so I wasn't particularly put off by their oh-so-obvious agenda. I quite liked Skinny Bitch as a motivational tool - get out and get moving, bitch!, basically - though I think quite a lot of their actual nutritional advice is either debatable or outright stupid. I'd recommend it if you need a good kick in the pants to get yourself motivated to lose weight (or to maintain a vegan lifestyle, like I was having difficulty with; I became a vegan three years ago due to animal-rights concerns, but I've been battling some pretty heavy stress and depression lately and found myself gravitating towards pizza and ice cream for comfort) but take everything with a grain of salt. If the only reference listed for a particular piece of nutritional advice is another diet book, not a scientific paper, you should probably stay skeptical. Also, the secret to losing weight isn't a starvation diet of fruits and vegetables, it's simply about burning more calories than you take in. So eat your (veggie) burgers and fries happily, and go for a run and lift weights. Moderation, not extremism, will be healthier, more fun, and easier to maintain in the long run. And if you're feeling yourself losing the fight, go back to the tough hitters in this book and refocus yourself a bit (just don't do a ten-day water fast. That 'woozy and light' feeling isn't your body detoxifing or purifying, it's your brain screaming out for nutrition. The liver and kidneys do fantastic jobs of detox on their own, by the way, you don't need to deprive them of nutrients to help the process along).more
I got half way through and just can't bring myself to read any further. I think it's for fear of what other horrific things I will read. After the graphic detail in which stories are told from workers at slaughter houses......I thought I was going to hurl!!!! It definitely makes you think and who knows maybe a lifestyle change or an activist may come from this. I haven't eaten meat in a few days but that doesn't mean I've given it up for good. Time will tell.more
This health book is anything but subtle. It doesn't try to hold your hand and gently try to coax you out of your bad eating habits; it puts information right in your face, which is refreshing.more
I wasn't bothered with the bad language as other readers were, but it's a personal preference thing. I thought the information presented was interesting and worth reading. If you don't believe in a vegan lifestyle or vegetarian for that matter I suggest you do not read this book as there is a very raw chapter on the meat industry, it did open my eyes however and I have been a vegetarian for two years with no regrets or thoughts of reverting to my old diet.more
It was only on p 141 that the authors got around to their main point of this book: "we could not tolerate the cruelty associated with a meat-eating diet and we wanted to help end animal suffering". This book is a puff piece for veganism under the guise of diet and weight loss. If you don't have an interest in eating veg/vegan, don't bother with this book. It isn't that they authors don't make some good points - they do - but it's lost in the "animal products are bad" overtones of the book. They also have something against sweeteners - which isn't rocket science but they don't seem to believe in moderation, which oddly is a criticism they have of Atkins and other no-carb diets. It seems as if absolutism "no meat! no sweeteners!" is fine so long as it's not talking about carbs.A decent one-day read but I'm glad I didn't spend money on it. Have now taken the others in the series off my wishlist as I didn't actually learn anything.more
I was given this book by a friend, after being vegan on and off for a few months. It was easy to read and finish in only a few hours. I really enjoyed reading it and have even gone on to further research some of the claims the authors have made. The way it is written is a little bit juvenile, and the chapters about animal products get a little opinionated. I have had family that has worked in the processing and animal product industries, so being vegan isn't that hard for me. Overall, though, this booked helped me to gain the motivation I needed to eat a healthy vegan diet and change my lifestyle. I've lost 30 pounds in about 2 months, and I feel fantastic. I read this book again every so often for inspiration.more
Loved this book. It changed my whole life. I am now a vegan. While it is graphic and does not mince words this is exactly what is needed to get the point across.more
Even though this book is heavily geared towards women, it does promote vegan lifestyle and so curiosity got the best of me. I admit I have never seen an introduction to veganism written in this manner (liked the curse words) and I have read quite a few books/articles on this subject. It was certainly informative (and entertaining), although I have found more than a few pieces of misinformation or incomplete information. This is probably a result of trying to "dumb down" some scientific lingo. There were some contradictory statements as well. It is also important to note, that even though there is a chapter on animal cruelty the predominant reason to go vegan according to the authors is one's health not the abuse and cruelty to animals. Since I consider myself to be educated on the subject of vegan diet and I lack the motivational factor to become a "skinny bitch", I didn't find this book very useful. I admit, however, that there are probably plenty of people who would.more
I give this book 3 stars for the idea behind it. It had great information (common sense stuff like: no soda, no sugar, no white flour, etc. - more fruit and veggies) but the way it was delivered was a bit crude. I'm not going to repeat any of it here but if you are easily offended (as I am obviously not), do not pick this one up. It did open my eyes a little more about what goes on behind the scenes in the beef/chicken/pork/fish industries.more
I was stranded at an airport during a three hour layover with nothing to read when I found this book. I admit, I only checked it out because of the name. I tend to avoid self-help books of any kind for the most part, especially diet books, but the name just made me laugh. After flipping through a few chapters and noticing the book is focused primarily on the health benefits of veganism and eating organic, I found myself very interested in the book as that is my lifestyle.The book is a quick read and it's written in a sarcastic manner that just had me laughing out loud quite a bit. However, the book was a bit more biased than I would have liked. Freedman and Barnounin are supporters of PETA, an organization that, despite my stance on animal rights, I really dislike. They quote PETA a lot so maybe I'm biased in that respect. They also play on the emotional aspects of slaughterhouses and factory farms. Yes, they're horrible. I won't argue that. But that's not what the title of the book led me to believe I'd be reading about.After reading several chapters on the crimes committed against animals, Freedman and Barnounin then went on a rant about the government and how they're lying about everything we're eating. I don't understand how they could even know this since they have no way of actually monitering what the government does or does not do and then comparing it to what they're telling us. I'm sure there are companies who are less than honest, but there's no way for an average person to get proof of that (is there?) and the blatant accusations made me a little uncomfortable.So in short, the book is one giant rant against the government and one giant promo towards animal rights. There are a few interesting facts in the book but I would only recommend reading this if you're really interested in animal rights and support PETA (and remember, this is coming from a vegan).more
This book would be a lot better if it wasn't doing such things as using PETA for a citation in its research. I'm all about eating vegan, but this book adds such a negative vibe to something that people should want to do on their own, for their own health and/or conscience, that I wouldn't recommend it to people simply based on its lack of sensitivity to the reality of what it is like to exist in the world of highly processed, highly marketed chemical-laced food. I'd say that this book is more of a catalyst for one to become an orthorexic or lead to some other disordered eating/thinking problem than it will lead people on the path to eating and living well.more
Afraid of dirty words? Don't read this book. On the fence? Tread carefully. Laugh in the face of crudeness? Go for it!I was cringing at the excessive use of icky words and nasty imagery (I have to admit, sometimes I was laughing in spite of myself). But I was also inspired. Sometimes you just need a little tough love in your self-help reading.This one goes a bit far with the whole gross-you-out tactic of persuasion for vegetarianism/veganism. It was quite heavy on the emotion and, "seriously, you eat meat?? How nasty can you be?!" vibe but still worth the read.I'm actually on a no-meat jag at the moment (began before I even read this book) and it really solidified that decision for me. I wouldn't count myself a full-on vegetarian, I'm still partial to cheese and occasional ice cream.Due to this book...drum roll please...I've given up coffee as my morning vice. Why? Read it, you'll find out.more
This funny, irreverent book takes us to task for our dietary sins. Even if you know all the rules you will learn a thing or two here- and they even throw in a few F bombs to get your attention!The Skinny Bitch way of eating is like a vegan version of Atkins, if you can imagine that. Good news is: it will work. Bad news: there really isn't enough information in here to make it happen if you don't know alot already. If you want to give it a try, flip through this version in the bookstore. If you are still interested, then buy Skinny Bitch in the Kitch. Recipes always help.more
This book takes an awful lot of common sense and presents it in a very entertaining manner. I have been eating this way for years now. For some reason our modern day world has lost sight of the fact that real food, grown from the ground is the healthiest. Hopefully people can read this and take a different look at the way they eat. And for people who choose to eat meat, they will hopefully now choose more carefully and avoid the high volume, factory farmed types.more
I picked this book for a friend, and read through it while I was waiting to see her. It is, in a word, terrible.First off, it is vegan propaganda in the guise of a self help book. If you are vegan or plan on becoming vegan and want a book about it, there are much better books out there that don't hide their true intentions.The bigger problem with this book is that the authors had no business writing it in the first place. Neither of them is qualified to give nutritional advice, and much of their advice is flat out wrong. One of the authors is a former modeling agent; the other is a former model with a degree in nutrition from an unaccredited correspondence school.If you want a poorly researched treatise on the benefits of becoming vegan written by foul mouthed models, then buy this book. If you want a book that offers more than insults and a fad diet, keep looking.more
Read all 34 reviews

Reviews

this book revealed a lot of nuances with my current diet. I'm a true believer now though and I'm sure Rory and Kim have done a good job leading me down the right path.....I recommend this book for anyone serious about getting skinny and dumping the self loathing that comes with being fatmore
These ladies really know their stuff! I love this book. It's hilarious, insightful, and it will change your life for the better.more
That is full of crap, false informations, misinformation. Be on any lobbying I would pursue for diffamation! Skinny? Sure but crazy too!more
Just an excuse to turn you into a vegan.more
It's a rude awakening , slap in the face but gets the point right across!! more
Great writing style - not the usual sweet nurturing tone. Liked the no nonsense tough love tongue in cheek style while still keeping anecdotes and references. My only concern about the pro-vegan lifestyle is the high consumption of soy products, prone to GMOs… does this not become just as harmful as animal by products?more
This is a really great book. I loved the writing style, it keeps you interested while giving you information about nutrition and eating habits. As a vegetarian, I agreed with the parts of the book about factory farming, but I found the vivid, graphic descriptions almost too much. Overall a really great book, I also love the menus and the resources that are included!more
At first I like the blunt and straight-forward style of the book, but after a while, the tone got tiresome, and I started looking forward to finishing the book. Some of the facts about the horrible state of the meat and dairy industry seemed extreme and sensational, trying to scare me into being a vegetarian when I already am one. I wish the authors had stuck to the health benefits vegetarianism and veganism, which I buy into better.

On the plus side, the book did give me some good ideas about attitude adjustment, and there are some good resources for books, websites, CDs and restaurant guides in the back.more
Poorly substantiated claims for the superiority of the vegan lifestyle wrapped in pseudo-hip profanity and sprinkled with Cosmo-girl emphasis. I found it simply awful on all fronts.more
This book was generally a load of crap. I feel absolutely cheated in reading this book.

I thought that this book was going to be a means of feeling empowered about food and body image. I thought it was going to be a guide to eating like all those "skinny bitches" many of us females see out there all the time. You know, the ones who pick listlessly at their grilled salmon and mixed greens while we chomp voraciously into our hamburgers? I wanted an insight into the way in which "skinny bitches" lead their lives and approach food, diet and exercise, since I think being skinny is more about mindset and behavior than necessarily about calorie intake or fat grams.

Instead, I got a 198 page rant, the main tagline of which was "Go Vegan, or else you will be fat and unhealthy forever." What utter tripe. I think the girls brought up some interesting (and horrifying) points about the meat packing industry and the danger of processed foods that many people consume on a daily basis, but I think it is manipulative (and ridiculous) to push the idea that the sole means of becoming healthy is by becoming vegan.

Furthermore, the girls barely discuss exercise and other means of getting healthy and their "motivational" language was insulting in the extreme. The idea of becoming a "skinny bitch" and adopting an in your face tone is one thing, but it is quite another to call you reader a "fat pig." Who do they think they are?

These girls come across as vapid, "Hollywood" dumb bitches who toss around some wikipedia level research in an attempt to push their ideas on the reader and adopt a superior, self righteous, holier than thou tone throughout. Only in the last pages do these authors try to whitewash their message with "love yourself" and "care about yourself" but at that point it's too late for me to feel anything but disgust with these stupid girls.

more
Ich habe das Buch via BookCrossing erhalten und relativ schnell gelesen. Es hat mich aber nicht begeistert. Die AutorInnen argumentieren mit flott und lustig, aber nicht in sich schlüssig. An einer Stelle wird vor Nahrungsmitteln mit Zusatzstoffen wie Vitaminen und Mineralstoffen gewarnt, einige Seiten später wird Reismilch mit Calzium und Vitamin A empfohlen. Ich finde es unnötige Propaganda Fleisch "kadaver" zu nennen, besonders weil die Autorinnen ohnehin gute Argumente bringen, warum man auf Fleisch verzichten sollte, wenn man dünn sein will.Das Argument "natürlich" wird recht willkürlich eingesetzt, um manche Lebensmittel für gut zu befinden und andere nicht. "Natürlichkeit" ist für mich aber kein Argument Gesundheitsschädlichkeit, Gesundheitsförderlichkeit, Umwelt- oder Ressourcenschonung sind für mich Argumente und nicht nur Polemik.more
Despite the title, this book is not really about getting skinny but getting healthy. Both the authors use a "tough-love" attitude that makes you laugh and makes you think. They tell you the truth about what the dairy and meat industries are up to, and explain what all those ingredients with the long words are. This book is very informative while being an interesting read. While the approved eating lists seemed less than comprehensive, there were quite a few good meal ideas on there. As a whole this is an eye-opening book that should be on everyone's reading list.more
I found the authors a little too obnoxious for my taste and I am not a vegan. Loved the title of the book, though.more
I found the authors a little too obnoxious for my taste and I am not a vegan. Loved the title of the book, though.more
There was such hype regarding this book. I don't know why I did not expect the tone inside based on the fact that the word b*tch is in the title. I found the language in the book to be inappropriate and unprofessional and detracting to their message. In fact, I couldn't get past the language to determine if their message had validity.more
Disclaimer: I'm already a vegan, so I wasn't particularly put off by their oh-so-obvious agenda. I quite liked Skinny Bitch as a motivational tool - get out and get moving, bitch!, basically - though I think quite a lot of their actual nutritional advice is either debatable or outright stupid. I'd recommend it if you need a good kick in the pants to get yourself motivated to lose weight (or to maintain a vegan lifestyle, like I was having difficulty with; I became a vegan three years ago due to animal-rights concerns, but I've been battling some pretty heavy stress and depression lately and found myself gravitating towards pizza and ice cream for comfort) but take everything with a grain of salt. If the only reference listed for a particular piece of nutritional advice is another diet book, not a scientific paper, you should probably stay skeptical. Also, the secret to losing weight isn't a starvation diet of fruits and vegetables, it's simply about burning more calories than you take in. So eat your (veggie) burgers and fries happily, and go for a run and lift weights. Moderation, not extremism, will be healthier, more fun, and easier to maintain in the long run. And if you're feeling yourself losing the fight, go back to the tough hitters in this book and refocus yourself a bit (just don't do a ten-day water fast. That 'woozy and light' feeling isn't your body detoxifing or purifying, it's your brain screaming out for nutrition. The liver and kidneys do fantastic jobs of detox on their own, by the way, you don't need to deprive them of nutrients to help the process along).more
I got half way through and just can't bring myself to read any further. I think it's for fear of what other horrific things I will read. After the graphic detail in which stories are told from workers at slaughter houses......I thought I was going to hurl!!!! It definitely makes you think and who knows maybe a lifestyle change or an activist may come from this. I haven't eaten meat in a few days but that doesn't mean I've given it up for good. Time will tell.more
This health book is anything but subtle. It doesn't try to hold your hand and gently try to coax you out of your bad eating habits; it puts information right in your face, which is refreshing.more
I wasn't bothered with the bad language as other readers were, but it's a personal preference thing. I thought the information presented was interesting and worth reading. If you don't believe in a vegan lifestyle or vegetarian for that matter I suggest you do not read this book as there is a very raw chapter on the meat industry, it did open my eyes however and I have been a vegetarian for two years with no regrets or thoughts of reverting to my old diet.more
It was only on p 141 that the authors got around to their main point of this book: "we could not tolerate the cruelty associated with a meat-eating diet and we wanted to help end animal suffering". This book is a puff piece for veganism under the guise of diet and weight loss. If you don't have an interest in eating veg/vegan, don't bother with this book. It isn't that they authors don't make some good points - they do - but it's lost in the "animal products are bad" overtones of the book. They also have something against sweeteners - which isn't rocket science but they don't seem to believe in moderation, which oddly is a criticism they have of Atkins and other no-carb diets. It seems as if absolutism "no meat! no sweeteners!" is fine so long as it's not talking about carbs.A decent one-day read but I'm glad I didn't spend money on it. Have now taken the others in the series off my wishlist as I didn't actually learn anything.more
I was given this book by a friend, after being vegan on and off for a few months. It was easy to read and finish in only a few hours. I really enjoyed reading it and have even gone on to further research some of the claims the authors have made. The way it is written is a little bit juvenile, and the chapters about animal products get a little opinionated. I have had family that has worked in the processing and animal product industries, so being vegan isn't that hard for me. Overall, though, this booked helped me to gain the motivation I needed to eat a healthy vegan diet and change my lifestyle. I've lost 30 pounds in about 2 months, and I feel fantastic. I read this book again every so often for inspiration.more
Loved this book. It changed my whole life. I am now a vegan. While it is graphic and does not mince words this is exactly what is needed to get the point across.more
Even though this book is heavily geared towards women, it does promote vegan lifestyle and so curiosity got the best of me. I admit I have never seen an introduction to veganism written in this manner (liked the curse words) and I have read quite a few books/articles on this subject. It was certainly informative (and entertaining), although I have found more than a few pieces of misinformation or incomplete information. This is probably a result of trying to "dumb down" some scientific lingo. There were some contradictory statements as well. It is also important to note, that even though there is a chapter on animal cruelty the predominant reason to go vegan according to the authors is one's health not the abuse and cruelty to animals. Since I consider myself to be educated on the subject of vegan diet and I lack the motivational factor to become a "skinny bitch", I didn't find this book very useful. I admit, however, that there are probably plenty of people who would.more
I give this book 3 stars for the idea behind it. It had great information (common sense stuff like: no soda, no sugar, no white flour, etc. - more fruit and veggies) but the way it was delivered was a bit crude. I'm not going to repeat any of it here but if you are easily offended (as I am obviously not), do not pick this one up. It did open my eyes a little more about what goes on behind the scenes in the beef/chicken/pork/fish industries.more
I was stranded at an airport during a three hour layover with nothing to read when I found this book. I admit, I only checked it out because of the name. I tend to avoid self-help books of any kind for the most part, especially diet books, but the name just made me laugh. After flipping through a few chapters and noticing the book is focused primarily on the health benefits of veganism and eating organic, I found myself very interested in the book as that is my lifestyle.The book is a quick read and it's written in a sarcastic manner that just had me laughing out loud quite a bit. However, the book was a bit more biased than I would have liked. Freedman and Barnounin are supporters of PETA, an organization that, despite my stance on animal rights, I really dislike. They quote PETA a lot so maybe I'm biased in that respect. They also play on the emotional aspects of slaughterhouses and factory farms. Yes, they're horrible. I won't argue that. But that's not what the title of the book led me to believe I'd be reading about.After reading several chapters on the crimes committed against animals, Freedman and Barnounin then went on a rant about the government and how they're lying about everything we're eating. I don't understand how they could even know this since they have no way of actually monitering what the government does or does not do and then comparing it to what they're telling us. I'm sure there are companies who are less than honest, but there's no way for an average person to get proof of that (is there?) and the blatant accusations made me a little uncomfortable.So in short, the book is one giant rant against the government and one giant promo towards animal rights. There are a few interesting facts in the book but I would only recommend reading this if you're really interested in animal rights and support PETA (and remember, this is coming from a vegan).more
This book would be a lot better if it wasn't doing such things as using PETA for a citation in its research. I'm all about eating vegan, but this book adds such a negative vibe to something that people should want to do on their own, for their own health and/or conscience, that I wouldn't recommend it to people simply based on its lack of sensitivity to the reality of what it is like to exist in the world of highly processed, highly marketed chemical-laced food. I'd say that this book is more of a catalyst for one to become an orthorexic or lead to some other disordered eating/thinking problem than it will lead people on the path to eating and living well.more
Afraid of dirty words? Don't read this book. On the fence? Tread carefully. Laugh in the face of crudeness? Go for it!I was cringing at the excessive use of icky words and nasty imagery (I have to admit, sometimes I was laughing in spite of myself). But I was also inspired. Sometimes you just need a little tough love in your self-help reading.This one goes a bit far with the whole gross-you-out tactic of persuasion for vegetarianism/veganism. It was quite heavy on the emotion and, "seriously, you eat meat?? How nasty can you be?!" vibe but still worth the read.I'm actually on a no-meat jag at the moment (began before I even read this book) and it really solidified that decision for me. I wouldn't count myself a full-on vegetarian, I'm still partial to cheese and occasional ice cream.Due to this book...drum roll please...I've given up coffee as my morning vice. Why? Read it, you'll find out.more
This funny, irreverent book takes us to task for our dietary sins. Even if you know all the rules you will learn a thing or two here- and they even throw in a few F bombs to get your attention!The Skinny Bitch way of eating is like a vegan version of Atkins, if you can imagine that. Good news is: it will work. Bad news: there really isn't enough information in here to make it happen if you don't know alot already. If you want to give it a try, flip through this version in the bookstore. If you are still interested, then buy Skinny Bitch in the Kitch. Recipes always help.more
This book takes an awful lot of common sense and presents it in a very entertaining manner. I have been eating this way for years now. For some reason our modern day world has lost sight of the fact that real food, grown from the ground is the healthiest. Hopefully people can read this and take a different look at the way they eat. And for people who choose to eat meat, they will hopefully now choose more carefully and avoid the high volume, factory farmed types.more
I picked this book for a friend, and read through it while I was waiting to see her. It is, in a word, terrible.First off, it is vegan propaganda in the guise of a self help book. If you are vegan or plan on becoming vegan and want a book about it, there are much better books out there that don't hide their true intentions.The bigger problem with this book is that the authors had no business writing it in the first place. Neither of them is qualified to give nutritional advice, and much of their advice is flat out wrong. One of the authors is a former modeling agent; the other is a former model with a degree in nutrition from an unaccredited correspondence school.If you want a poorly researched treatise on the benefits of becoming vegan written by foul mouthed models, then buy this book. If you want a book that offers more than insults and a fad diet, keep looking.more
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