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From the Publisher

Mercedes sells sexual favours to a married ex-lover while Yasuko’s husband eats more than just pasta at the dinner table. Devra recalls the moment she first realized she was a lesbian while Sterling helps Michelle overcome her fear of shower sex. An artist’s wife gives a first-time model the tongue-lashing of a lifetime, and Gina teaches her man that a quiet evening at home is far more fun than a drinking binge with the boys.

6 great stories for the price of none!

Published: eXcessica Publishing on
ISBN: 9781609826406
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for 6 Erotic Shorts
Available for free

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