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Dawn Dais hated running. And it didn't like her much, either. Her fitness routine consisted of avoiding the stairs in her own house, because who really has the energy to climb stairs? It was with this exercise philosophy firmly in place that she set off to complete a marathon.

The Nonrunner's Marathon Guide for Women is a fun training manual for women who don't believe that running is their biological destiny but who dream of crossing the finish line nonetheless. Revised in 2013, it now includes a new chapter on using technology as a training aid.

Dais’s book features a realistic training schedule and is chock-full of how-to's, quizzes, and funny observations, which she felt were lacking in the guides she had consulted. She also integrates entries from her journal, sharing everything would-be marathoners need to know about the gear, the blisters, the early morning workouts, the late-night carb binges, andmost important of allthe amazing rewards.

Anyone can do a marathon. This book just makes the experience a little more bearable and a lot more fun.

Topics: Sports, Exercise, Weight Loss, Goals & Aspirations, Guides, Funny, and Inspirational

Published: Seal Press on Dec 29, 2006
ISBN: 9781580052801
List price: $17.00
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Excellent. I loved the book. Found a lot of information useful. Very funny - author knows how to connect with her intended audience. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Cute and funny, like if the Pioneer Woman took up running or something.
BUT! All of that, and then it turns out she doesn't even RUN the whole way? Not that I think anyone should ever run a marathon, but if that's what your book is about? Hm.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked up The (Non)Runner's Marathon Guide for Women last month after finishing Claire Kowalchik's book about running for women (you can read the review here). I wanted a running book with which I could better relate. I'm a super slow runner and didn't even make it onto any of the charts in Kowalchik's book, which was a little defeating for me. So when I read about Dais' book, which tracks her struggle through training for a marathon, while also giving great tips for people who have never really run before, or haven't run much at least.I loved this book because I related so well with the things Dais talked about. She talked about feeling discouraged because every time she went out for a run she would end up right back where she started. She also describes her first trip to the running store where she learned about the importance of shoe fit, spandex and bodyglide (which I had never heard of until reading this book). She includes some great stretches, as well as a 20-week training schedule for both a marathon and a half marathon. She also leaves space for journaling, and for answering questions she poses, such as "Why are you running this marathon?" and "What was life like before you began training and after"?An example before and after from her book:VitaminsBefore: Do the rainbow of fruit flavors in Skittles count?After: Pills the size of marshmallows washed down with one of my thirty-two gallons of water.For me, the best part of this book were the personal journal entries from when Dais was training for her own marathon. Dais' perspective is so true to how I think most new runners feel that it's hard not to laugh out loud (I couldn't read this book in public because I kept snorting at her writing). Here's a sample:"This weekend my little calendar o' runnin' said that I had to run sixteen miles. Is it me or is this number just getting ridiculous? Sixteen miles. What possible reason could one ever have for running sixteen miles? After about Mile 10, just call a cab and save yourself a lot of effort. Hell, call me. I'll give you a lift. Believe me, it's just not worth it. One fun fact about sixteen miles - that's about how far away hell is. I know you'd think it'd be farther away, at least as far as Fresno. But you'd be wrong. Actually, I think I hit hell around mile 14, so it's an even shorter trip."If you're new to running, or even if you've been running a long time, I highly suggest picking up Dais' book because it'll remind you of what it was like when you started and why you run. It'll also remind you that you're not the only one who suffers for running. If you are training for a marathon though, I suggest picking up some other books as well. Dais' book is great for moral support, but I think there are some others out there that would add a little more technical support, unless of course you have your own personal trainer.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Excellent. I loved the book. Found a lot of information useful. Very funny - author knows how to connect with her intended audience.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Cute and funny, like if the Pioneer Woman took up running or something.
BUT! All of that, and then it turns out she doesn't even RUN the whole way? Not that I think anyone should ever run a marathon, but if that's what your book is about? Hm.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked up The (Non)Runner's Marathon Guide for Women last month after finishing Claire Kowalchik's book about running for women (you can read the review here). I wanted a running book with which I could better relate. I'm a super slow runner and didn't even make it onto any of the charts in Kowalchik's book, which was a little defeating for me. So when I read about Dais' book, which tracks her struggle through training for a marathon, while also giving great tips for people who have never really run before, or haven't run much at least.I loved this book because I related so well with the things Dais talked about. She talked about feeling discouraged because every time she went out for a run she would end up right back where she started. She also describes her first trip to the running store where she learned about the importance of shoe fit, spandex and bodyglide (which I had never heard of until reading this book). She includes some great stretches, as well as a 20-week training schedule for both a marathon and a half marathon. She also leaves space for journaling, and for answering questions she poses, such as "Why are you running this marathon?" and "What was life like before you began training and after"?An example before and after from her book:VitaminsBefore: Do the rainbow of fruit flavors in Skittles count?After: Pills the size of marshmallows washed down with one of my thirty-two gallons of water.For me, the best part of this book were the personal journal entries from when Dais was training for her own marathon. Dais' perspective is so true to how I think most new runners feel that it's hard not to laugh out loud (I couldn't read this book in public because I kept snorting at her writing). Here's a sample:"This weekend my little calendar o' runnin' said that I had to run sixteen miles. Is it me or is this number just getting ridiculous? Sixteen miles. What possible reason could one ever have for running sixteen miles? After about Mile 10, just call a cab and save yourself a lot of effort. Hell, call me. I'll give you a lift. Believe me, it's just not worth it. One fun fact about sixteen miles - that's about how far away hell is. I know you'd think it'd be farther away, at least as far as Fresno. But you'd be wrong. Actually, I think I hit hell around mile 14, so it's an even shorter trip."If you're new to running, or even if you've been running a long time, I highly suggest picking up Dais' book because it'll remind you of what it was like when you started and why you run. It'll also remind you that you're not the only one who suffers for running. If you are training for a marathon though, I suggest picking up some other books as well. Dais' book is great for moral support, but I think there are some others out there that would add a little more technical support, unless of course you have your own personal trainer.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As a lifetime "runner" who really would be classified as a part-time jogger I found this book very motivational. While training for my first marathon I read it over and over. It was inspirational that a non-runner who had some of the same difficulties that I did could complete a marathon. I went on to run 3 marathons. While I probably could have done it without this book, it did help me feel not so alone amongst the wanna-be Kenyans in my running group.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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