Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Consider Facebook—it’s human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them.

In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It’s a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for—and sacrificing—in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today’s self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

Topics: Social Media, The Internet, Media Studies, Communication, Anthropology, Philosophical, and Contemplative

Published: Basic Books on
ISBN: 9780465022342
List price: $17.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Alone Together by Sherry Turkle
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
This book sometimes gave me the chills, not because of some scary future it portrays but because Turkle poses, and attempts to answer, some of the deepest imaginable questions about human relationships and the impact of information technology and what another favorite auther, Nicco Mele (okay, he is my son), calls "radical connectivity" on our lives. By the way, Turkle is not out to scare us, but some of the encounters and interviews she relates are creepy enough to be discomforting.more
I found this book fascinating and also quite disturbing. Turkle, a clinical psychologist and MIT professor, discusses her observations and research on the impact digital immersion has had upon human relationships. What I found particularly interesting and troubling are the observations Turkle makes from the hundreds of interviews she has had with children and teens. There is much cause for concern in how digital immersion negatively affects the emotional, psychological, and social development of young people.more
Ok, but not quite what I expected. More academic than practical, but still good info. Reinforces the fact that multitasking makes us do many things poorly, and that we do lose something when we only connect through our devices.more
If you ever have had doubts about the effect technology is having on personal relationships, this book makes for a compelling read. At times scary, sometimes almost heart-breaking, it looks at the ways that people are turning to virtual relationships whether on-line or with robots as an easier alternative to dealing face-to-face with many aspects of life. Based on the author's extensive research, but written in a reader-friendly manner, this book is a non-fiction page-turner.more
Read all 15 reviews

Reviews

This book sometimes gave me the chills, not because of some scary future it portrays but because Turkle poses, and attempts to answer, some of the deepest imaginable questions about human relationships and the impact of information technology and what another favorite auther, Nicco Mele (okay, he is my son), calls "radical connectivity" on our lives. By the way, Turkle is not out to scare us, but some of the encounters and interviews she relates are creepy enough to be discomforting.more
I found this book fascinating and also quite disturbing. Turkle, a clinical psychologist and MIT professor, discusses her observations and research on the impact digital immersion has had upon human relationships. What I found particularly interesting and troubling are the observations Turkle makes from the hundreds of interviews she has had with children and teens. There is much cause for concern in how digital immersion negatively affects the emotional, psychological, and social development of young people.more
Ok, but not quite what I expected. More academic than practical, but still good info. Reinforces the fact that multitasking makes us do many things poorly, and that we do lose something when we only connect through our devices.more
If you ever have had doubts about the effect technology is having on personal relationships, this book makes for a compelling read. At times scary, sometimes almost heart-breaking, it looks at the ways that people are turning to virtual relationships whether on-line or with robots as an easier alternative to dealing face-to-face with many aspects of life. Based on the author's extensive research, but written in a reader-friendly manner, this book is a non-fiction page-turner.more
Not really an enjoyable in the usual sense that a book can be enjoyable... while I agree with most of her stances here, the book is overall extremely critical and part one especially almost cynically so. All in all, this book will be good for those who are not critical of technology and the roads its taking our ultramodern society. I actually did order her two other related books (this is the third in a trilogy)...more
Load more
scribd