From the Publisher

The Lost World is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic tale of fantasy. Two scientists, a big game hunter and a journalist set off to the wilds of South America and the Amazon in search of prehistoric beasts. There, high atop an Amazonian plateau they find an amazing land of strange and dangerous ancient creatures. The Lost World is a classic tale of science-fiction adventure that has inspired many successive works and is considered by many fans of the genre as one of the greatest sciencefiction stories ever written.
Published: Chicago Review Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9780897338592
List price: $12.99
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