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From the Publisher

Why does Canada have such an inflated portion of the global bubble gum market? What is driving modern versions of the old penny candy store? Candymaking in Canada takes the wrapper off Canada’s thriving chocolate and sweets industry. Confectionery is a global business with remarkably regional tastes, and this book offers a first-time glimpse inside it. It’s a nostalgic look at the chocolate phenomenon, the role of seasonal treats, and the importance of packaging. From the sugary highs to the low-fat lows, this is the story behind many of Canada’s favourite brands in a beautifully illustrated volume.

Published: Dundurn on
ISBN: 9781459712690
List price: $9.99
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