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From the Publisher

This extensive and long overdue work of reference covers all of the bird species, more than 400 of which have been recorded in the province of Ontario. Birds of Ontario contains an identification and description of all species, with 344 outstanding colour plates. Anyone with even a casual interest in birds will find the colour plates and informative text of considerable interest. This volume contains a list of all the birds identified in Ontario up to the end of 1983, with the common and scientific names given by the American Ornithologists’ Union 1983 Check-list as arranged in that work.

Published: Dundurn on
ISBN: 9781459718418
List price: $11.99
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