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Tale of two separated lovers, Charlie and Elizabeth. The pair, driven apart by a beastly clause of a will that grants Charles a massive inheritance if he finds gainful employment for six months, keep each other up to date in a series of letters. Charlie finds work in a house for wayward girls. Not to be outdone, Elizabeth replies back with her stories of a visiting the harem of a local pasha.

Published: Olympia Press on Apr 22, 1983
ISBN: 9781626571181
List price: $2.99
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This book, originally published by Charles Carrington in 1905, is ostensibly by Jean de Villiot, who was probably Hugues Rebell. According to Richard Manton, in the Grove edition of 1983, it is essentially a continuation of 'The Amorous Memoirs of Capt. De Vane', in which a number of low-class girls of callipygous shape are subjected to vigorous chastisement with canes and birches, as a supplement to debaucheries of an (at least partly) consensual nature. We are re-introduced to Lesley Cox, Noreen, Maggie and Miss Jolly, amongst others; characters who seem to have been popular figures in Edwardian erotica. Two lovers, Charlie and Lizzie, are separated and must continue their liaison in the form of letters, Charlie's concerning his duties in a strict academy for young ladies, and Lizzie's reporting on her experiences in an Arabian harem. Both situations provide ample opportunities for erotic stimulus. This book is a classic of Edwardian erotic literature.read more
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This book, originally published by Charles Carrington in 1905, is ostensibly by Jean de Villiot, who was probably Hugues Rebell. According to Richard Manton, in the Grove edition of 1983, it is essentially a continuation of 'The Amorous Memoirs of Capt. De Vane', in which a number of low-class girls of callipygous shape are subjected to vigorous chastisement with canes and birches, as a supplement to debaucheries of an (at least partly) consensual nature. We are re-introduced to Lesley Cox, Noreen, Maggie and Miss Jolly, amongst others; characters who seem to have been popular figures in Edwardian erotica. Two lovers, Charlie and Lizzie, are separated and must continue their liaison in the form of letters, Charlie's concerning his duties in a strict academy for young ladies, and Lizzie's reporting on her experiences in an Arabian harem. Both situations provide ample opportunities for erotic stimulus. This book is a classic of Edwardian erotic literature.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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