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CANCIÓN DE HIELO Y FUEGO V

Después de una colosal batalla, el futuro de los Siete Reinos pende de un hilo, acuciado por nuevas amenazas que emergen de todos los rincones y en todas direcciones. En el este, Daenerys Targaryen, el último eslabón de la Casa Targaryen, gobierna con sus tres dragones como la reina de una ciudad construida sobre polvo y muerte. Pero Daenerys tiene miles de enemigos, y muchos se han propuesto dar con ella. A medida que ellos la buscan, un joven emprende su propio camino hacia la reina, con un objetivo diametralmente distinto…

Tyrion Lannister también se dirige hacia Daenerys mientras escapa de Poniente, donde le han puesto precio a su cabeza. Sus nuevos aliados en esta huida, no obstante, no son los malhechores que aparentan ser, y entre ellos se encuentra aquel que podría impedir que Daenerys se haga del control de Poniente para siempre.
  
Mientras tanto, al norte se halla el colosal Muro de Hielo. Allí, Jon Nieve enfrentará el más grande de los retos: sus más acérrimos enemigos no sólo forman parte de la guardia que dirige, sino que se extienden más allá de la tenebrosa tierra de las criaturas de hielo.

De todos los rincones, enconados conflictos cobran nuevos bríos, traiciones íntimas se perpetran y un gran elenco de proscritos y sacerdotes, soldados y criaturas camaleónicas, nobles y esclavos, enfrentarán obstáculos en apariencia insuperables. Algunos fracasarán, otros crecerán en la fuerza de la oscuridad. Pero en tiempos de agitación in crescendo, los hilos del destino y la política arrastrarán a los personajes y al lector, inevitablemente, a la más espectacular de las danzas.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on Jun 25, 2014
ISBN: 9781101873571
List price: $9.99
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Good one. More action, less wandering around.read more
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Still loving the serie. I was happy to discover new personnage, even if it made me miss sometimes the one we grew accustomed to. Again, twists and turns through all the book. Will now have to wait patiently for the following book...read more
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The final??? book in the series? I hope not. There's still more to learn about all the character and I love this world.read more
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I don't even know what to say. Damn. Just... damn. Fine work.read more
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I was utterly distraught to realise that this was not the final book in the series. I have read books one to five over the last 6 months and really wanted to finish the series. Now I'll have to wait for the remaining two books to be written. Sigh.read more
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The long awaited sequel in the "Song of Ice and Fire" series from George RR Martin did not disappoint. All of my favorite characters were back, and their adventures continued. Although I thought that Arya was given short shrift, I liked the continuation of Danny's story, as well as Jon's. The ending was a shocker, but it leaves me hanging, and wanting more. Overall, it was a great book, and I would suggest it to anyone who has read the other Ice and Fire books.read more
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Noooo. I tried to savor it and make it last as long as I could. I'm finished now and am sad because I must wait until book 6, The Winds of Winter. Dragons lived up to my expectations and then some.read more
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I read this book on my Kindle app. This long-awaited fifth entry in the Fire and Ice series had its ups and downs. Separating this book from Feast for Crows by character rather than chronology made for some dull early chapters. When he passes the point where the last book finishes, the story definitely picks up. By the end, you can see where some of the plot lines may be coming together and a resolution may be in sight. While I feel this book is more uneven than the first three books in the series, it is still outstanding fantasy. Very violent and explicit; recommended for adults.read more
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AMAZING. Of course. And all it's managed to do is make me jones for the next TWO. Hurry up, George!read more
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To sum it up. I liked this one, but didn't love it like the other books. Mostly because the story doesn't seem to evolve to a climax anytime soon (I mean within 2 books). Also I lost the tension that even the main characters could die as easily as all the other characters.It's starting to get more of the same. Plot over plot in plot through plot etc. Main characters everywhere. It's starting to look like a sitcom with less humor.And also.[spoiler alert] The characters that get killed lately, don't have the guts to stay dead. And I don't mean starting to zombie or walking with a tremendous gash in your neck. I enjoyed it immensely that Bran and Rickon weren't killed after all. George looked like he was slashing everyone I started to know. But since book 4, the number of miraculously being alive has steadily grown: Brienne resurrected, Tyrion, Theon and there was even a short mention that maybe even the hound is alive. And I'm probably forgetting someone. Oh yeah. The sister of Theon, Asha. Also not dead afterall. So, I'm not really confinced Jon is dead either. Of course I like John to live, but I also liked this book because the main characters could really die. I would really love to get a bit of that harsness and unpredictability of the earlier books back. Talking of unpredictability. At some moment in the book, Jaime starts thinking about Brienne, And look who shows up? Brienne. [end spoiler allert]Another problem is. I'm really wondering where this is heading. There's a lot happening, but we're not really going forward. Although I love the series, I would really like it to be done with it before I'm dead myself. If I'm lucky I've still got 50 years left, but at this rate, even that might be not enough.read more
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After the relatively disappointing Book 4, Book 5 was really enjoyable. Everyone's favorite characters are back and the storytelling is as fine as ever. I really got my hopes up during the middle of the book, but should have remembered that there are two books left. Martin certainly leaves us twisting in the wind.read more
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As always George R.R.Martin leaves us with so many lose ends and wanting for more.I enjoyed Book 5, although at times it was quite the task to keep up with the amount of characters.This book, in my opinion, did not keep pace with Book 4.( That was a quick read for me).Awaiting Book 6, hopefully we will have a shorter wait than 5 years!!!Mother of Dragons, help!!!read more
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Just as good as his other previous books in this series. The way he kills off main characters I am wondering if there will be anyone left when he finally ends the story :) Hopefully we won't have to wait too long for the next installment. I just hate it when a year or more passes before they release the next book and you have just about forgotten what was going on in the last book!read more
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We've been waiting six long years for the next verse of A Song of Ice and Fire. Was it worth it? Well, fans of the series will undoubtedly gobble it up (most already have). In the previous book, A Feast for Crows, Martin decided to split character lines between two books. Therefore, A Dance with Dragons is meant to exist in parallel with the 4th book, not in sequence with it. This might work better for those reading the series straight through; but for those of us who waited six years, it seemed rather disjointed. For starters, I often had to brush aside the cobwebs of my long-term memory to recall events alluded to that were running in concert with the events in this book; or plot lines left hanging from the third book. As such, I think I enjoyed it a little less than I might have otherwise. I also suspect some day, someone will re-integrate the story lines. By then, the stress of a 2000-page book will be mitigated by the common usage of digital media. If Martin takes another 6 years to produce the next book, that could be a even dozen since last hearing from the Feast of Crows crew (granted, that might be too soon to hear again from the likes of Sansa Stark).On to the story. The primary story lines follow Jon Snow, Cersei Lannister, Daenerys Targaryean, Theon Greyjoy, Tyrion Lannister, and Arya Stark. Many secondary characters share the spotlight, and there is a fair measure of new blood as well. The two most significant events occurring at this time are Stannis Baratheon's attempt to consolidate power in the north, and Daenerys attempt to consolidate her power through marriage to a terrorist leader. There is some foreshadowing of future events with the humiliation of Cercei, and the invasion in the south of a pro-Targaryan force with a surprise figure. Dany's dragons have grown and become a danger to society, adding to her difficulty in reaching peace accords with various warlords who simply want them (and possibly her) dead. There is also the now-traditional culling of the dramatis personae -- although I won't mention here who or how. It might have been necessary to reign in some of the far-flung story lines to a more manageable set for the next book. If you've never read the A Song of Ice and Fire series, now is as good a time as any to get started. Read the books, then watch the excellent HBO TV series. On its own merit, A Dance with Dragons falls short of perfection. It advances the story lines of half the story, and there are few conclusions. What is written is very good...but the frustration of another possibly-long wait is palpable. It took longer for me to get through the nearly 1000 pages of this book than it did any of the others; and I'm sure the long separation had much to do with it.read more
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While I will continue to read the Song of Ice and Fire, I do feel that the editing process could have reduced the size of the book. The detail that Martin goes into bogs the book down and while you can see he is setting things up like a good chess player I would like not feel that the story flowed better.read more
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At first I thought this book was going to be cliff-hanger after cliff-hanger, with no story progression. I was wrong. The story moves wonderfully and sets things up so well for the next book. I really enjoyed it from beginning to end. If you are a fan of the series this book will not disappoint.read more
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I've been reading George RR Martin's series, A Song of Ice and Fire, since the first book came out in the late '90's and have been hooked ever since I read the first page. I've read and re-read lots of times, although my favorite was the week my husband and I spent in Jamaica reading the series together. It made for an awesome holiday - just us, the beach, our books, and the folks that brought us fruit and drinks. Heaven.Martin is telling an epic saga and telling it in ways that defy expectations about what fantasy is and what can happen in it. Most people think of fantasy as all elves and dwarves and princesses and dragons - very high fantasy, very predictable (almost like a Hollywood musical) full of fights and the hero or heroine getting what they want at the end. Also lots of magic.Martin is doing something very different here. This is not high fantasy (although there are dragons) or medieval historical fiction, but its own thing. The books are not based as much in magic as they are in human interaction of all kinds - conversations, sword fights, plotting and scheming, and trying to survive within the range of choices that are available to them. In some ways these books remind me a lot of Dune (the first one - there never ever should have been sequels). There is complex world building, dynamic and complex characters, and politics - lots and lots of politics.Martin is concerned with and doing many things within this series. He's been called brutal, and I suppose he is, but the brutality is never gratuitous and is always in service of the story. Magic, when it appears at all, is connected with religion. Martin plays with the relationship between religion and magic and his magic is always terrifying because it doesn't happen very often and is usually blood magic.Martin's writing is very descriptive and detailed - he writes armor better than any writer I've ever read. His intertwined stories are complex. Even his secondary characters are imagined down to their past lives. There are no black and white absolutes - everything is shades of gray and the most honorable man can be an enormous fool and horrible ruler just as a dishonorable one can be a great ruler. The one difficulty in reading Martin is the length of time between books - and it is lengthy. I've been inside these books so much that in the time between books I miss the characters as if they were faraway family - this also makes the reunion bright.A Dance with Dragons is the fifth in the series. It is massive - many pages, lots of fine print - and at times I wished for a Nook or a Kindle because lugging it around was such a workout. It was also extremely enjoyable and worth the additional exercise.A Dance with Dragons is parallel in time to the actions in A Feast of Crows. Where A Feast of Crows is mostly dealing with what some consider unnecessary secondary characters (I think it's fabulous because I like to know about everybody), Dragons is all about the primary characters. What's happening, why is it happening, and where is everyone going to end up? In Martin's writing where characters end up can be almost anywhere or anything you can imagine. I loved reconnecting with favorite characters, Tyrion, Jon Snow, Daenerys, even Cersei. I enjoyed the new plot threads and characters introduced and it was a fine read. If I say much more I'm going to fill this review with spoilers and I don't want to do that.If you haven't read this series, you're missing out. An epic story told like no other it will capture your imagination, steal away time, and make you think, think, think.P.S. The TV series, A Game of Thrones, is excellent - true to the book and spot-on casting.read more
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(NOTE: This will be a spoiler-free review.)So, I have reached the end of the latest installment in A Song of Ice and Fire.A Dance With Dragons is monstrous. Simply monstrous. I read the ebook version (guess it goes to show you that if you really want to read a book, you’ll still pay the “hardcover” early release price no matter what your principles are… ahem) which weighed in at a whopping four bloody megabytes. That’s 4000KB. If you’ve never looked closely, most ebooks weigh in at less than 1/8 of that.I’m not ashamed to say that I am a fan of Mr. Martin’s work. I discovered them only after the 4th book was published, when I literally picked up the first one in my local Barnes & Noble, straight off the shelf, and thought “huh… this looks long. Maybe it will keep me entertained for a while.”In case you missed the previous mention, I read fast. Like, really fast. Like, so fast that I polished off this 4000KB ebook in a matter of 2 1/2 days, and that wasn’t even reading non-stop.Suffice to say that once I picked up A Game of Thrones and read it through, I was pretty well hooked.As for Dance, despite the long lag time between it and its predecessor, Crows, it feels as though no time at all has elapsed. Martin’s prose is identical to his other works; highly polished at most points, with the occasional highlight of awkwardness and as close to zero romance (in all senses of the word) as possible. Most of the awkwardness comes at times when the reader is meant to feel awkward, so it works, just as it always has. It feels as though Crows and Dance could have been written simultaneously – which, of course, they partially were.We at last get to see the points of view from the characters we missed in Crows: Jon Snow at the Wall, Daenerys in the east and Tyrion, most precisely. Each of them has several revelations throughout Dance, and important ones at that. However, for the vast length of the book, it doesn’t really feel like we’ve advanced all that much farther in the story by the end. I think these books are so long in part because they seem to move at the pace of life itself – glacially. I think there’s a fair amount of ground covered in this narrative that didn’t need to be, personally. It does all tie together fairly well toward the end, but during the middle at times it felt as if certain characters were being led around simply to give them more words in their chapters rather than for a driving plot purpose. It does not drag as much as Crows did at times, mostly because the POV characters are more interesting than the ones in the previous installment, but it does have times where it drags.Despite this minor flaw, however – if you’ve liked Martin’s previous works, this one will not disappoint. If you didn’t like his earlier stuff, you won’t like this one either. This book is not going to cause anyone to change sides. For me, it did not take me out of my firm position in Martin’s camp, and ready to patiently wait for Book 6 of the series to arrive in the same solid, readable, and brilliantly casted and developed fantasy world that I’ve come to think may be simply the best example of world-building since Tolkien. He’s just that good, folks.A Dance With Dragons is not perfect (I don’t think any work at this length could be perfect!), but it’s damn, damn good. 4 1/2 stars out of 5.read more
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Not as good as the previous ones, but still entertainingread more
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This is book 5 of A Song of Ice and Fire series. They have all been good. Lots of well developed characters that are both heros or villians and very human.read more
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(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.)As regular readers know, it's been a year and a half now since I got seduced into reading what many now refer to as the "Game of Thrones novels" because of the popular TV series, more formally known as "A Song of Ice and Fire" or simply the Westeros novels; it was only for the first in the series that I did a big extended write-up, which I encourage you to check out for the details of how I feel about the entire story overall, with each subsequent novel getting just a small check-in from me here. And in fact, with the finishing of volume 5, A Dance with Dragons, I'm now officially caught up with all the writing that currently exists (a sixth and seventh volume are still expected in the future); but alas, after four thousand pages so far that had kept me surprisingly engaged, given that I'm not a usual fan of fantasy novels, the veneer is finally starting to wear off here around page five thousand. And I suppose the main reason for this is because of a strange decision Martin made for this and the previous volume; that after simultaneously juggling a dozen different major storylines set all around that fictional world in the first three books, for volumes 4 and 5 he decided to split these storylines into two groups and deal with only one in each book, and unfortunately a lot of the stuff I care about the least all ended up here in the second half together. See, the reason that so many usual non-fans of this genre have been getting sucked into this series is because Martin not only keeps the supernatural elements down to a bare minimum, but in fact all of the usual tropes about fantasy that drive us non-fans crazy (the endless weirdo made-up names, the endless faux-Medieval dialogue), delivering instead a fascinatingly complex and realistic look at what the Middle Ages in Western Europe were actually like; so the times when he does most lapse into cartoonishly complicated regal wars and Elfquest-like character names, for example like in all the scenes set with Daenerys Targaryen over in the mysterious eastern continent of their world, my eyes tend to glaze over for good, especially when combined with the fact that nothing has actually happened with Daenerys for the last thousand pages than endless fretting over her newly formed and shakily held kingdom. It still has its charms, and for sure I'll be reading the last volumes as well when they eventually come out; but A Dance with Dragons was the first moment this series started reminding me of its length, and demonstrating why five thousand pages is an awfully long distance to follow a single massive story.Out of 10: 8.0read more
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great book. can't wait for the next................read more
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The story continues, george rr martin maintains his high standards and complex storyline. The characters are developed with even greater depth. Leaves you desperate to read the next book immediately. So come on George let us have it!read more
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Love love LOVE this series, and I've never really read fantasy before (except Tolkien as a kid). Sad to have this book end. Hanging for the next book!!!! Still think Book 3 of the series was the best.read more
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An excellent addition to the series. At last we finally get a glimpse of what's going to happen in the rest of the series as armies and players begin to converge on Westeros, or at least make plans to do so. Like the previous books, characters we've come to know well die in this book, or do they? There is at least one that while said to be dead, since we haven't seen the body, its quite likely is not dead yet. This is still vast in scope and meticulous in detail, and new parts of the world are introduced. The ending is a bit of a cliffhanger though. This book is more crude than the previous books, in my opinion. He has apparently embraced the idea that his books are different because his characters are more physical, and gone even farther than before. This is unfortunate, as it isn't necessary. This is still a well written, engaging and fascinating fantasy epic.read more
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Get an editor. I think you could cut out 3/4 of the stuff across the narrow sea, at least. Too many Reeza al Ratzos and Raaza mo Reezos; too many Golden Brothers and Endless Companies; too much pointless traveling; too many rapes. Don't get me started on all the talking. Just cut it out.

On the plus side, you had some of the best writing and character work of the series with the Jon Snow chapters. Some of the Bolton stuff was truly disturbing (in a good, Stephen King kind of way), and even the Ironborn bits were somewhat compelling.

But as the end lamely gassed to a halt, I'd wished there was a little more momentum to keep me fired up through the long wait for the next book.read more
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I gave 5 stars mainly because I'm in love with the series...but this book was a bit of a disappointment. I wasn't as thrilled as when I read the first few pages of A Game of Thrones. But I admit, George RR Martin knows how to make the readers think twice. My conclusions were entirely way off, but that's a good thing. And I hate George for killing a lot of wonderful characters, but I also love him for keeping it real. This is not a fairytale people, not all good people will see the morrow and that's the reality of life. He's right, who wants to read a book where you already know who's going to die and who's going to live? That's boring and too predictable. Oh well, Tyrion and Jon Snow kept me going...I don't know about all the other characters though. A lot of them keep showing up and all I want to read about are the Starks. Oh well, just hoping the Starks will have a happy reunion soon...Can't wait for the next book to come out.read more
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Finally returned to the Song of Ice and Fire after a brief hiatus. The momentum of series escalates with 'A Dance with Dragons' and some important dangling character threads are picked up. Not all of these are resolved and there is a significant cliffhanger moment at the end of the book, but the overall complexity of the world remains the same. I particularly liked the sustained Tyrion-as-slave thread and the occasional mention of the Iron Bank...because someone has to be funding the troops of Westeros. Now that I am caught up with the series, the waiting game commences.read more
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After reading Martin's "A Feast for Crows," I wrote to a friend who also was reading the "Song of Ice and Fire" series, and suggested I might not read the next volume. I told her that when I started the series, I wondered where Martin was going. After "Crows" I wondered, "Is he going anywhere"? But, having invested a lot of time in the first four books, i decided to give "A Dance With Dragons" a try. I'm glad I did. I still don't know where Martin is going, but the journey's become more interesting.I started reading the series while HBO was advertising in advance of "A Game of Thrones." The more I read of Martin, the more I'm convinced HBO was the only choice to produce these books, with violence and sex galore. Most specifically, like HBO's "The Sopranos" and "Boardwalk Empire," Martin has no compunction about killing off major characters early and often. When I began "A Game of Thrones," I thought the story was about Ned Stark. I was wrong. Robb Stark? Wrong again. The two bastards, Jon Stark and Tyrion Lannister? Doesn't look like it. Maybe it's Anya and Bran's story. Or Daenerys. Who knows.Sometimes I think Martin's paid by the word. Not because his stories are so long, but because of the many diversions he takes - to different cities , introducing new characters, some who advance the plot, and many who don't. We get a full look at the cultures of these cities - religions, customs, dress, hairstyles, coins, favorite foods. All interesting enough, but sometimes I mentally scream, "Get on with it"!But Martin does write stirring set pieces, such as the procession of the northmen through the Wall; the release of the dragons; and Cersei's repentance. It's these large-scale scenes - and the fates of the remaining major characters - that keep me going. Who is the story about? I hope we'll eventually find out.read more
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Wow. What an immense story and it still isn't finished. I nearly cried when I realised that books 6 and 7 are at least 3 years away from publishing. But then I realised that was my chance to re-read books 1 to 5 !A Song of Ice and Fire is incredibly complex, at times frustrating when trying to recall characters from book to book but wonderful. The characters are engaging, interesting, awful and cruel and the vivid descriptions of landscapes, battles and cities are incredible. I often struggle to visualise places when reading but George R.R. Martin's books I "saw" everything.The books are written in short chapters, moving from character to character quickly. Many times I thought "I wonder what's happened to ... there hasn't been a chapter about him/her in ages". Strong characters like Tyrion Lannister, Bran Stark, Jon Snow, Brianne of Tarth and Arya Stark had me laughing and crying and completely invested in their journeys.I loved these books. All of them. I don't say that very often :)read more
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Good one. More action, less wandering around.
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Still loving the serie. I was happy to discover new personnage, even if it made me miss sometimes the one we grew accustomed to. Again, twists and turns through all the book. Will now have to wait patiently for the following book...
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The final??? book in the series? I hope not. There's still more to learn about all the character and I love this world.
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I don't even know what to say. Damn. Just... damn. Fine work.
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I was utterly distraught to realise that this was not the final book in the series. I have read books one to five over the last 6 months and really wanted to finish the series. Now I'll have to wait for the remaining two books to be written. Sigh.
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The long awaited sequel in the "Song of Ice and Fire" series from George RR Martin did not disappoint. All of my favorite characters were back, and their adventures continued. Although I thought that Arya was given short shrift, I liked the continuation of Danny's story, as well as Jon's. The ending was a shocker, but it leaves me hanging, and wanting more. Overall, it was a great book, and I would suggest it to anyone who has read the other Ice and Fire books.
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Noooo. I tried to savor it and make it last as long as I could. I'm finished now and am sad because I must wait until book 6, The Winds of Winter. Dragons lived up to my expectations and then some.
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I read this book on my Kindle app. This long-awaited fifth entry in the Fire and Ice series had its ups and downs. Separating this book from Feast for Crows by character rather than chronology made for some dull early chapters. When he passes the point where the last book finishes, the story definitely picks up. By the end, you can see where some of the plot lines may be coming together and a resolution may be in sight. While I feel this book is more uneven than the first three books in the series, it is still outstanding fantasy. Very violent and explicit; recommended for adults.
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AMAZING. Of course. And all it's managed to do is make me jones for the next TWO. Hurry up, George!
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To sum it up. I liked this one, but didn't love it like the other books. Mostly because the story doesn't seem to evolve to a climax anytime soon (I mean within 2 books). Also I lost the tension that even the main characters could die as easily as all the other characters.It's starting to get more of the same. Plot over plot in plot through plot etc. Main characters everywhere. It's starting to look like a sitcom with less humor.And also.[spoiler alert] The characters that get killed lately, don't have the guts to stay dead. And I don't mean starting to zombie or walking with a tremendous gash in your neck. I enjoyed it immensely that Bran and Rickon weren't killed after all. George looked like he was slashing everyone I started to know. But since book 4, the number of miraculously being alive has steadily grown: Brienne resurrected, Tyrion, Theon and there was even a short mention that maybe even the hound is alive. And I'm probably forgetting someone. Oh yeah. The sister of Theon, Asha. Also not dead afterall. So, I'm not really confinced Jon is dead either. Of course I like John to live, but I also liked this book because the main characters could really die. I would really love to get a bit of that harsness and unpredictability of the earlier books back. Talking of unpredictability. At some moment in the book, Jaime starts thinking about Brienne, And look who shows up? Brienne. [end spoiler allert]Another problem is. I'm really wondering where this is heading. There's a lot happening, but we're not really going forward. Although I love the series, I would really like it to be done with it before I'm dead myself. If I'm lucky I've still got 50 years left, but at this rate, even that might be not enough.
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After the relatively disappointing Book 4, Book 5 was really enjoyable. Everyone's favorite characters are back and the storytelling is as fine as ever. I really got my hopes up during the middle of the book, but should have remembered that there are two books left. Martin certainly leaves us twisting in the wind.
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As always George R.R.Martin leaves us with so many lose ends and wanting for more.I enjoyed Book 5, although at times it was quite the task to keep up with the amount of characters.This book, in my opinion, did not keep pace with Book 4.( That was a quick read for me).Awaiting Book 6, hopefully we will have a shorter wait than 5 years!!!Mother of Dragons, help!!!
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Just as good as his other previous books in this series. The way he kills off main characters I am wondering if there will be anyone left when he finally ends the story :) Hopefully we won't have to wait too long for the next installment. I just hate it when a year or more passes before they release the next book and you have just about forgotten what was going on in the last book!
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We've been waiting six long years for the next verse of A Song of Ice and Fire. Was it worth it? Well, fans of the series will undoubtedly gobble it up (most already have). In the previous book, A Feast for Crows, Martin decided to split character lines between two books. Therefore, A Dance with Dragons is meant to exist in parallel with the 4th book, not in sequence with it. This might work better for those reading the series straight through; but for those of us who waited six years, it seemed rather disjointed. For starters, I often had to brush aside the cobwebs of my long-term memory to recall events alluded to that were running in concert with the events in this book; or plot lines left hanging from the third book. As such, I think I enjoyed it a little less than I might have otherwise. I also suspect some day, someone will re-integrate the story lines. By then, the stress of a 2000-page book will be mitigated by the common usage of digital media. If Martin takes another 6 years to produce the next book, that could be a even dozen since last hearing from the Feast of Crows crew (granted, that might be too soon to hear again from the likes of Sansa Stark).On to the story. The primary story lines follow Jon Snow, Cersei Lannister, Daenerys Targaryean, Theon Greyjoy, Tyrion Lannister, and Arya Stark. Many secondary characters share the spotlight, and there is a fair measure of new blood as well. The two most significant events occurring at this time are Stannis Baratheon's attempt to consolidate power in the north, and Daenerys attempt to consolidate her power through marriage to a terrorist leader. There is some foreshadowing of future events with the humiliation of Cercei, and the invasion in the south of a pro-Targaryan force with a surprise figure. Dany's dragons have grown and become a danger to society, adding to her difficulty in reaching peace accords with various warlords who simply want them (and possibly her) dead. There is also the now-traditional culling of the dramatis personae -- although I won't mention here who or how. It might have been necessary to reign in some of the far-flung story lines to a more manageable set for the next book. If you've never read the A Song of Ice and Fire series, now is as good a time as any to get started. Read the books, then watch the excellent HBO TV series. On its own merit, A Dance with Dragons falls short of perfection. It advances the story lines of half the story, and there are few conclusions. What is written is very good...but the frustration of another possibly-long wait is palpable. It took longer for me to get through the nearly 1000 pages of this book than it did any of the others; and I'm sure the long separation had much to do with it.
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While I will continue to read the Song of Ice and Fire, I do feel that the editing process could have reduced the size of the book. The detail that Martin goes into bogs the book down and while you can see he is setting things up like a good chess player I would like not feel that the story flowed better.
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At first I thought this book was going to be cliff-hanger after cliff-hanger, with no story progression. I was wrong. The story moves wonderfully and sets things up so well for the next book. I really enjoyed it from beginning to end. If you are a fan of the series this book will not disappoint.
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I've been reading George RR Martin's series, A Song of Ice and Fire, since the first book came out in the late '90's and have been hooked ever since I read the first page. I've read and re-read lots of times, although my favorite was the week my husband and I spent in Jamaica reading the series together. It made for an awesome holiday - just us, the beach, our books, and the folks that brought us fruit and drinks. Heaven.Martin is telling an epic saga and telling it in ways that defy expectations about what fantasy is and what can happen in it. Most people think of fantasy as all elves and dwarves and princesses and dragons - very high fantasy, very predictable (almost like a Hollywood musical) full of fights and the hero or heroine getting what they want at the end. Also lots of magic.Martin is doing something very different here. This is not high fantasy (although there are dragons) or medieval historical fiction, but its own thing. The books are not based as much in magic as they are in human interaction of all kinds - conversations, sword fights, plotting and scheming, and trying to survive within the range of choices that are available to them. In some ways these books remind me a lot of Dune (the first one - there never ever should have been sequels). There is complex world building, dynamic and complex characters, and politics - lots and lots of politics.Martin is concerned with and doing many things within this series. He's been called brutal, and I suppose he is, but the brutality is never gratuitous and is always in service of the story. Magic, when it appears at all, is connected with religion. Martin plays with the relationship between religion and magic and his magic is always terrifying because it doesn't happen very often and is usually blood magic.Martin's writing is very descriptive and detailed - he writes armor better than any writer I've ever read. His intertwined stories are complex. Even his secondary characters are imagined down to their past lives. There are no black and white absolutes - everything is shades of gray and the most honorable man can be an enormous fool and horrible ruler just as a dishonorable one can be a great ruler. The one difficulty in reading Martin is the length of time between books - and it is lengthy. I've been inside these books so much that in the time between books I miss the characters as if they were faraway family - this also makes the reunion bright.A Dance with Dragons is the fifth in the series. It is massive - many pages, lots of fine print - and at times I wished for a Nook or a Kindle because lugging it around was such a workout. It was also extremely enjoyable and worth the additional exercise.A Dance with Dragons is parallel in time to the actions in A Feast of Crows. Where A Feast of Crows is mostly dealing with what some consider unnecessary secondary characters (I think it's fabulous because I like to know about everybody), Dragons is all about the primary characters. What's happening, why is it happening, and where is everyone going to end up? In Martin's writing where characters end up can be almost anywhere or anything you can imagine. I loved reconnecting with favorite characters, Tyrion, Jon Snow, Daenerys, even Cersei. I enjoyed the new plot threads and characters introduced and it was a fine read. If I say much more I'm going to fill this review with spoilers and I don't want to do that.If you haven't read this series, you're missing out. An epic story told like no other it will capture your imagination, steal away time, and make you think, think, think.P.S. The TV series, A Game of Thrones, is excellent - true to the book and spot-on casting.
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(NOTE: This will be a spoiler-free review.)So, I have reached the end of the latest installment in A Song of Ice and Fire.A Dance With Dragons is monstrous. Simply monstrous. I read the ebook version (guess it goes to show you that if you really want to read a book, you’ll still pay the “hardcover” early release price no matter what your principles are… ahem) which weighed in at a whopping four bloody megabytes. That’s 4000KB. If you’ve never looked closely, most ebooks weigh in at less than 1/8 of that.I’m not ashamed to say that I am a fan of Mr. Martin’s work. I discovered them only after the 4th book was published, when I literally picked up the first one in my local Barnes & Noble, straight off the shelf, and thought “huh… this looks long. Maybe it will keep me entertained for a while.”In case you missed the previous mention, I read fast. Like, really fast. Like, so fast that I polished off this 4000KB ebook in a matter of 2 1/2 days, and that wasn’t even reading non-stop.Suffice to say that once I picked up A Game of Thrones and read it through, I was pretty well hooked.As for Dance, despite the long lag time between it and its predecessor, Crows, it feels as though no time at all has elapsed. Martin’s prose is identical to his other works; highly polished at most points, with the occasional highlight of awkwardness and as close to zero romance (in all senses of the word) as possible. Most of the awkwardness comes at times when the reader is meant to feel awkward, so it works, just as it always has. It feels as though Crows and Dance could have been written simultaneously – which, of course, they partially were.We at last get to see the points of view from the characters we missed in Crows: Jon Snow at the Wall, Daenerys in the east and Tyrion, most precisely. Each of them has several revelations throughout Dance, and important ones at that. However, for the vast length of the book, it doesn’t really feel like we’ve advanced all that much farther in the story by the end. I think these books are so long in part because they seem to move at the pace of life itself – glacially. I think there’s a fair amount of ground covered in this narrative that didn’t need to be, personally. It does all tie together fairly well toward the end, but during the middle at times it felt as if certain characters were being led around simply to give them more words in their chapters rather than for a driving plot purpose. It does not drag as much as Crows did at times, mostly because the POV characters are more interesting than the ones in the previous installment, but it does have times where it drags.Despite this minor flaw, however – if you’ve liked Martin’s previous works, this one will not disappoint. If you didn’t like his earlier stuff, you won’t like this one either. This book is not going to cause anyone to change sides. For me, it did not take me out of my firm position in Martin’s camp, and ready to patiently wait for Book 6 of the series to arrive in the same solid, readable, and brilliantly casted and developed fantasy world that I’ve come to think may be simply the best example of world-building since Tolkien. He’s just that good, folks.A Dance With Dragons is not perfect (I don’t think any work at this length could be perfect!), but it’s damn, damn good. 4 1/2 stars out of 5.
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Not as good as the previous ones, but still entertaining
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This is book 5 of A Song of Ice and Fire series. They have all been good. Lots of well developed characters that are both heros or villians and very human.
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(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.)As regular readers know, it's been a year and a half now since I got seduced into reading what many now refer to as the "Game of Thrones novels" because of the popular TV series, more formally known as "A Song of Ice and Fire" or simply the Westeros novels; it was only for the first in the series that I did a big extended write-up, which I encourage you to check out for the details of how I feel about the entire story overall, with each subsequent novel getting just a small check-in from me here. And in fact, with the finishing of volume 5, A Dance with Dragons, I'm now officially caught up with all the writing that currently exists (a sixth and seventh volume are still expected in the future); but alas, after four thousand pages so far that had kept me surprisingly engaged, given that I'm not a usual fan of fantasy novels, the veneer is finally starting to wear off here around page five thousand. And I suppose the main reason for this is because of a strange decision Martin made for this and the previous volume; that after simultaneously juggling a dozen different major storylines set all around that fictional world in the first three books, for volumes 4 and 5 he decided to split these storylines into two groups and deal with only one in each book, and unfortunately a lot of the stuff I care about the least all ended up here in the second half together. See, the reason that so many usual non-fans of this genre have been getting sucked into this series is because Martin not only keeps the supernatural elements down to a bare minimum, but in fact all of the usual tropes about fantasy that drive us non-fans crazy (the endless weirdo made-up names, the endless faux-Medieval dialogue), delivering instead a fascinatingly complex and realistic look at what the Middle Ages in Western Europe were actually like; so the times when he does most lapse into cartoonishly complicated regal wars and Elfquest-like character names, for example like in all the scenes set with Daenerys Targaryen over in the mysterious eastern continent of their world, my eyes tend to glaze over for good, especially when combined with the fact that nothing has actually happened with Daenerys for the last thousand pages than endless fretting over her newly formed and shakily held kingdom. It still has its charms, and for sure I'll be reading the last volumes as well when they eventually come out; but A Dance with Dragons was the first moment this series started reminding me of its length, and demonstrating why five thousand pages is an awfully long distance to follow a single massive story.Out of 10: 8.0
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great book. can't wait for the next................
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The story continues, george rr martin maintains his high standards and complex storyline. The characters are developed with even greater depth. Leaves you desperate to read the next book immediately. So come on George let us have it!
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Love love LOVE this series, and I've never really read fantasy before (except Tolkien as a kid). Sad to have this book end. Hanging for the next book!!!! Still think Book 3 of the series was the best.
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An excellent addition to the series. At last we finally get a glimpse of what's going to happen in the rest of the series as armies and players begin to converge on Westeros, or at least make plans to do so. Like the previous books, characters we've come to know well die in this book, or do they? There is at least one that while said to be dead, since we haven't seen the body, its quite likely is not dead yet. This is still vast in scope and meticulous in detail, and new parts of the world are introduced. The ending is a bit of a cliffhanger though. This book is more crude than the previous books, in my opinion. He has apparently embraced the idea that his books are different because his characters are more physical, and gone even farther than before. This is unfortunate, as it isn't necessary. This is still a well written, engaging and fascinating fantasy epic.
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Get an editor. I think you could cut out 3/4 of the stuff across the narrow sea, at least. Too many Reeza al Ratzos and Raaza mo Reezos; too many Golden Brothers and Endless Companies; too much pointless traveling; too many rapes. Don't get me started on all the talking. Just cut it out.

On the plus side, you had some of the best writing and character work of the series with the Jon Snow chapters. Some of the Bolton stuff was truly disturbing (in a good, Stephen King kind of way), and even the Ironborn bits were somewhat compelling.

But as the end lamely gassed to a halt, I'd wished there was a little more momentum to keep me fired up through the long wait for the next book.
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I gave 5 stars mainly because I'm in love with the series...but this book was a bit of a disappointment. I wasn't as thrilled as when I read the first few pages of A Game of Thrones. But I admit, George RR Martin knows how to make the readers think twice. My conclusions were entirely way off, but that's a good thing. And I hate George for killing a lot of wonderful characters, but I also love him for keeping it real. This is not a fairytale people, not all good people will see the morrow and that's the reality of life. He's right, who wants to read a book where you already know who's going to die and who's going to live? That's boring and too predictable. Oh well, Tyrion and Jon Snow kept me going...I don't know about all the other characters though. A lot of them keep showing up and all I want to read about are the Starks. Oh well, just hoping the Starks will have a happy reunion soon...Can't wait for the next book to come out.
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Finally returned to the Song of Ice and Fire after a brief hiatus. The momentum of series escalates with 'A Dance with Dragons' and some important dangling character threads are picked up. Not all of these are resolved and there is a significant cliffhanger moment at the end of the book, but the overall complexity of the world remains the same. I particularly liked the sustained Tyrion-as-slave thread and the occasional mention of the Iron Bank...because someone has to be funding the troops of Westeros. Now that I am caught up with the series, the waiting game commences.
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After reading Martin's "A Feast for Crows," I wrote to a friend who also was reading the "Song of Ice and Fire" series, and suggested I might not read the next volume. I told her that when I started the series, I wondered where Martin was going. After "Crows" I wondered, "Is he going anywhere"? But, having invested a lot of time in the first four books, i decided to give "A Dance With Dragons" a try. I'm glad I did. I still don't know where Martin is going, but the journey's become more interesting.I started reading the series while HBO was advertising in advance of "A Game of Thrones." The more I read of Martin, the more I'm convinced HBO was the only choice to produce these books, with violence and sex galore. Most specifically, like HBO's "The Sopranos" and "Boardwalk Empire," Martin has no compunction about killing off major characters early and often. When I began "A Game of Thrones," I thought the story was about Ned Stark. I was wrong. Robb Stark? Wrong again. The two bastards, Jon Stark and Tyrion Lannister? Doesn't look like it. Maybe it's Anya and Bran's story. Or Daenerys. Who knows.Sometimes I think Martin's paid by the word. Not because his stories are so long, but because of the many diversions he takes - to different cities , introducing new characters, some who advance the plot, and many who don't. We get a full look at the cultures of these cities - religions, customs, dress, hairstyles, coins, favorite foods. All interesting enough, but sometimes I mentally scream, "Get on with it"!But Martin does write stirring set pieces, such as the procession of the northmen through the Wall; the release of the dragons; and Cersei's repentance. It's these large-scale scenes - and the fates of the remaining major characters - that keep me going. Who is the story about? I hope we'll eventually find out.
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Wow. What an immense story and it still isn't finished. I nearly cried when I realised that books 6 and 7 are at least 3 years away from publishing. But then I realised that was my chance to re-read books 1 to 5 !A Song of Ice and Fire is incredibly complex, at times frustrating when trying to recall characters from book to book but wonderful. The characters are engaging, interesting, awful and cruel and the vivid descriptions of landscapes, battles and cities are incredible. I often struggle to visualise places when reading but George R.R. Martin's books I "saw" everything.The books are written in short chapters, moving from character to character quickly. Many times I thought "I wonder what's happened to ... there hasn't been a chapter about him/her in ages". Strong characters like Tyrion Lannister, Bran Stark, Jon Snow, Brianne of Tarth and Arya Stark had me laughing and crying and completely invested in their journeys.I loved these books. All of them. I don't say that very often :)
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