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Urban Detective: Cha Cha's Rising is the story of Morgan Styles, a detective with the brains and the will to make a positive change in his city. Styles is caught between his growing loyalty to the family of the victim in his current case and his desire for justice. All hell breaks lose when a villain from the past resurfaces as the focus of his investigation.
Published: Xlibris on Jun 23, 2014
ISBN: 9781499008753
List price: $3.99
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This is not the sort of pornographic screed that so many imagine it to be, though I had not expected it to be from having read other works of a similar reputation and finding them to have an altogether different purpose than titillation. Lawrence's goal here is to sound the battle cry of the body against the cold machinery of industry and privileged intellectualism. He makes this evident multiple times in both narration and dialogue. He eventually makes this Connie's cause celebre, but it is not always believable given her upper crust naivete, which moves in and out of her personality like the flicker of a faulty candle. That is to say nothing about Mellors' apparent indifference to Connie throughout much of the work. Despite some thin characterization, Lawrence crafts a lyrical and readable prose and paints a celebration of the body and its passions. All the while, the reality of an increasingly soulless and mechanized world lurks in the background as a phantasmal antagonist.read more
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Wow...D.H. Lawrence's descriptive talent is alive in this novel. The sexual content, that was so controversial shortly after it's publication, is woven within the story with good taste and is, by no means, smutty or offensive. Like John Travolta said in "Phenomenon"...it is a guide to a woman's heart and emotions.read more
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I can see why this was so controversial in the past, but the language and images are definitely mild by today's standards. A lyrical story of sexual awakening. I would recommend reading this back-to-back with [Their Eyes Were Watching God] by [[Zora Neale Hurston]], another excellent story of sexual awakening.read more
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Reviews

This is not the sort of pornographic screed that so many imagine it to be, though I had not expected it to be from having read other works of a similar reputation and finding them to have an altogether different purpose than titillation. Lawrence's goal here is to sound the battle cry of the body against the cold machinery of industry and privileged intellectualism. He makes this evident multiple times in both narration and dialogue. He eventually makes this Connie's cause celebre, but it is not always believable given her upper crust naivete, which moves in and out of her personality like the flicker of a faulty candle. That is to say nothing about Mellors' apparent indifference to Connie throughout much of the work. Despite some thin characterization, Lawrence crafts a lyrical and readable prose and paints a celebration of the body and its passions. All the while, the reality of an increasingly soulless and mechanized world lurks in the background as a phantasmal antagonist.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow...D.H. Lawrence's descriptive talent is alive in this novel. The sexual content, that was so controversial shortly after it's publication, is woven within the story with good taste and is, by no means, smutty or offensive. Like John Travolta said in "Phenomenon"...it is a guide to a woman's heart and emotions.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I can see why this was so controversial in the past, but the language and images are definitely mild by today's standards. A lyrical story of sexual awakening. I would recommend reading this back-to-back with [Their Eyes Were Watching God] by [[Zora Neale Hurston]], another excellent story of sexual awakening.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The least execrable of Lawrence's work but still the most easily parodied. At least it's short, which is more than one can say for 'The Rainbow'.
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D.H on love is something else. Emotional realism and sex!
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I found this an interesting piece of social history, more than anything else: the conditions of the miners of the East Midlands and their uneasy relationship with the owners of the mines as the countryside got increasingly taken over by industry. It really was a time when the landed gentry were losing their grip over the government of the country; a time of great social and economic change.The book is famous for being the subject of a trial relating to obscenity in 1960 and I was actually expecting it to be more explicit than it is, as a consequence of that. It uses explicit words, to be sure, but not in a particularly titillating way. The focus is on the complexity of the Chatterly's relationship, Connie's confused feelings for Mellors and Mellors' own uncertainty about his place in the world. The style is very literary and as I read, I imagined the reactions of lots of disappointed people who would have bought the book on the strength of the trial and would probably been rather disappointed in its contents.I found the discussions of Clifford and his male friends rather tedious, in the first half of the book, but enjoyed the second half more. Lawrence did a good job of portraying the depth of the various relationships. I did rather wonder about Mellors' relationship with his daughter: he seemed to move on with little thought of her. But I don't think Lawrence had children of his own, so perhaps this wasn't a big deal for him.Mellors' despair over the miners' striving after cash touched a chord with me. My favourite quotations was: "If you could only tell them that living and spending isn't the same thing! But it's no good. If only they were educated to live instead of earn and spend, they could manage very happily...".
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