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From the Publisher

'Get the cameras rolling - Indiana Jones meets Alien. What a combination of mystery, suspense, and unspeakable horror. I loved it!' R.L. Stine
Some monsters only exist in nightmares - others exist for real...

While hunting in the Nez Pearce National Forest, Idaho, two men are just about to take a prize-winning shot when their prey unexpectedly bolts. From the forest behind them lunges a huge, horrific creature that crushes one man and tears after the other in a loping mass of rage.

Just as he has embarked on a search to find his missing fiancée, Ethan Warner and his partner, Nicola Lopez, are summoned to a meeting with Doug Jarvis of the Defence Intelligence Agency at a research laboratory outside the city. There, they learn that they are being sent north to interview Jesse MacCarthy, a man accused of a double homicide.

But all is not as it seems. Jesse swears blind that the other men were killed by a monster. But as Warner and Lopez dig deeper, they uncover a military secret that has been kept under wraps for generations, an experiment that went terribly wrong, and danger lurking in the highest echelons of the US government.

'Earth-shattering intrigue, hyperdrive action and a desperate race to save humanity, cranked up to the max with scarily realistic science and apocalyptic religion thrown in for good measure . . . a major new talent has hit the mystery thriller scene' Scott Mariani, bestselling author of The Lost Relic

'The fossilised remains of a 7,000-year-old creature dug from the sands of the Negev Desert in Israel become the bones of contention in Dean Crawford's fast-paced debut thriller... The book neatly threads together a wild variety of plotlines' Wall Street Journal

`Partly mythical read, part thriller this pacy tale is a page turner guaranteed to keep you up late' Sun
Published: Simon & Schuster UK on
ISBN: 9781471102561
List price: $9.99
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