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From the Publisher

This volume is a miscellany of writings that Jung published after the Collected Works had been planned, minor and fugitive works that he wished to assign to a special volume, and early writings that came to light in the course of research.

Published: Princeton University Press on
ISBN: 9781400851010
List price: $157.50
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