Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
The Age of Innocence won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize. The story is set in upper class New York City in the 1870s. The Age of Innocence centers on an upper class couple's impending marriage, and the introduction of a woman plagued by scandal whose presence threatens their happiness. Though the novel questions the assumptions and morals of 1870's New York society, it never devolves into an outright condemnation. In fact, Wharton considered this novel an apology for her earlier, more brutal and critical novel, The House of Mirth.
Published: Start Publishing LLC an imprint of NBN Books on Jun 1, 1920
ISBN: 9781625583055
List price: $1.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Age of Innocence
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

well-written book. newland archer seems set to condition in the path of tradition created by his well-off new york ancestors by marrying, may welland, another descendent of well-off new yorkers. that is until the arrival of her cousin, countess ellen olenska. she rocks newland's world and that of the tight-knit, upper-crust new york society. ellen is off the cuff and unconventional and she draws newland in; his love is not only for her but for that of change and throwing off the shackles that nice, conventional, duty-bound new york has chained him in. may represents all the things of that society and, therefore, doesn't make newland's heart skip a beat but makes him feel he's done what he should and that's what bothers him!wharton draws her characters well (reading the descriptions of old catherine are awesome) and makes you empathize with the deadened spiritual crisis newland fights through in wanting to strike out on his own from the path that's been laid out for him.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this rather desultorily in high school, and didn't think much of it. I still didn't greatly enjoy the bulk of it... I'm just not generally very fond of period pieces about high-society interiors, unless they're of Russian provenance. What did get me this time around is the craft... just how tightly-written it is, and how well-rendered emotions and relationships and the small gestures which serve as their currency are. And the ending was right in a torturous sort of way... not what you're rooting for as the biased reader, but ultimately true to the story and the characters.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Brilliant. Newland Archer, shorter after becoming engaged, falls in love with his betrothed's cousin and realizes his life will be dull and stultifying. An indictment of NY social life in the early 1900's. A brutal examination of marriage.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

well-written book. newland archer seems set to condition in the path of tradition created by his well-off new york ancestors by marrying, may welland, another descendent of well-off new yorkers. that is until the arrival of her cousin, countess ellen olenska. she rocks newland's world and that of the tight-knit, upper-crust new york society. ellen is off the cuff and unconventional and she draws newland in; his love is not only for her but for that of change and throwing off the shackles that nice, conventional, duty-bound new york has chained him in. may represents all the things of that society and, therefore, doesn't make newland's heart skip a beat but makes him feel he's done what he should and that's what bothers him!wharton draws her characters well (reading the descriptions of old catherine are awesome) and makes you empathize with the deadened spiritual crisis newland fights through in wanting to strike out on his own from the path that's been laid out for him.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this rather desultorily in high school, and didn't think much of it. I still didn't greatly enjoy the bulk of it... I'm just not generally very fond of period pieces about high-society interiors, unless they're of Russian provenance. What did get me this time around is the craft... just how tightly-written it is, and how well-rendered emotions and relationships and the small gestures which serve as their currency are. And the ending was right in a torturous sort of way... not what you're rooting for as the biased reader, but ultimately true to the story and the characters.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Brilliant. Newland Archer, shorter after becoming engaged, falls in love with his betrothed's cousin and realizes his life will be dull and stultifying. An indictment of NY social life in the early 1900's. A brutal examination of marriage.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
So stifling, open the windows and let the air in. Claustrophobic and great.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I first read this book in high school then again in college, it remains one of my favorite books. Though the hopeless romantic in me just loathes the ending! I often stop reading just before the final moments so I can envision the ending MY way. LOL Sorry Edith!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Written in the early part of the 20th century, recipient of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, and considered a Classic for a reason. Almost ninety years later, it is still an intriguing look at the smugness of the old order of New York society. Wharton's story of the struggle between personal yearnings and the constraints of propriety combined with her eloquent writing make for an intriguing story of the consequences we pay for our decisions.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd