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Sally never would have guessed a fortune could prove such a disadvantage, until she had one.... this explains why she agrees to back a show written by her fiancé Gerald and staged by her brother, Fillmore. It seems like a good idea at the time ... but when Ginger Kemp, a rather hopeless, charming young man offers not-very-glad tidings about Gerald, the Wodehouse fun really starts. Sally soon finds that life in New York has becoming altogether too thorny, and a trip to England can only make the whole state of affairs worse.
Published: Start Publishing LLC an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781627930185
List price: $1.99
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Sally is delightful; I love her madly and, while I knew it would all turn out right in the end, it was a fun trip to get there. Wodehouse still a complete wizard with words.more
Disclaimer: As a huge Wodehouse fan, everything starts at four stars and goes up or down from there.Characteristic of early Wodehouse, "The Adventures of Sally" is a little more serious, and a little less repetitive, than his later works. It's also a little less fun. However, you can definitely see the seeds of his later, more famous characters, and I enjoyed reading it immensely.more
The Adventures of Sally, first published in serial form in 1921, is a rather unusual Wodehouse story. The author's irrepressible comic wit peeps through occasionally, but the novel takes a much more serious tone than the usual lighthearted farce that is Wodehouse's signature. I didn't know what to make of it at first, having been accustomed to a steady diet of Jeeves and Blandings, but I found that a more plot-driven Wodehouse isn't a bad storyteller at all.Sally Nicholas, who has been scraping a living for several years as a professional ballroom dancer, has just come into her inheritance. The future looks rosy—she can quit her job, she's going to tour Europe, and she's engaged to Gerald, an up-and-coming playwright (though the engagement is secret because his plays haven't yet caught on). Her only worry is her brother, Fillmore, whose crazy schemes for hitting it big in business usually go badly... until he invests in Gerald's latest play and it becomes wildly popular. But Sally's comfortable world is turned on its head when her friend Ginger Kemp brings her bad news. Suddenly Sally must decide what to do with the rest of her life—a life nothing like what she had dreamt of. The characters, though fitting into somewhat stereotypical roles, play their parts well and even with depth. Bruce Carmyle is brilliantly named and I can see him so clearly in my mind. Sally is sympathetically drawn and suffers serious loss and depression quite unlike Wodehouse's more generally known heroines. Ginger is one of those characters you start off feeling patronizing about and end up cheering madly on. Wodehouse also makes some keen observations about what people will sacrifice for their careers; rather chilling. And Uncle Donald, though a bit player, smacks of the comical relatives that will later populate Wodehouse's literary worlds. It was interesting to see a different side of Wodehouse—or perhaps a less-developed Wodehouse who hadn't yet found his footing as a master of comedy. It makes perfect sense that he would be able to write characters who go through devastating betrayals and touch the reader with sympathy rather than amusement. This insight is probably why Wodehouse can soar to such hilarious heights in his better-known works; it's grounded in a real knowledge of human emotion. I wouldn't exactly call this a serious novel—there's too much fun in it—but it's certainly the closest I've seen Wodehouse come to somber. And that's not a bad thing at all, once you know what to expect.more
This book is actually not as sweet as most Wodehouse stories. The mean people are meaner, more selfish and self-centered, rigid. Still, not surprisingly, all works out in the end and even the mean people are happy. The answer to what the Sally's true love should do with his life was a surprise to me; although it is suggested at the very beginning of the book.And there is a wonderfully brief description of a man, who I presume is the exact opposite of Mr. Wodehouse: "He was the sort of man who always has a pencil, and the backs of old envelopes never enter into his life." [p 60]more
As always, Wodehouse charms and entertains. His plots are fun, and his language is exquisite. Douglas Adams said Wodehouse was the greatest comedic writer in English, and I agree. Punch said criticizing Wodehouse was like taking a spade to a soufflé. Just enjoy the soufflé.more
Another Wodehouse classic, which this time sees the unfortunate Sally gaining and losing both a fortune and several suitors before finding domestic bliss in an unexpected quarter. Add in the difficulties of explaining the duties of a scrum-half to a bewildered American and keeping several large dogs - not to mention several Broadway actresses - under control, and copious quantities of Wodehouse wit and style, and you have the makings of a wonderful story.more
Fun story about Sally Nicholas who became an heiress, and then had to sope with her brother and the defection of her fiance, and two possible suitors. Set in France, England and America this is Wodehouse in gently funny mode. Good stuff, as ever!more
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Reviews

Sally is delightful; I love her madly and, while I knew it would all turn out right in the end, it was a fun trip to get there. Wodehouse still a complete wizard with words.more
Disclaimer: As a huge Wodehouse fan, everything starts at four stars and goes up or down from there.Characteristic of early Wodehouse, "The Adventures of Sally" is a little more serious, and a little less repetitive, than his later works. It's also a little less fun. However, you can definitely see the seeds of his later, more famous characters, and I enjoyed reading it immensely.more
The Adventures of Sally, first published in serial form in 1921, is a rather unusual Wodehouse story. The author's irrepressible comic wit peeps through occasionally, but the novel takes a much more serious tone than the usual lighthearted farce that is Wodehouse's signature. I didn't know what to make of it at first, having been accustomed to a steady diet of Jeeves and Blandings, but I found that a more plot-driven Wodehouse isn't a bad storyteller at all.Sally Nicholas, who has been scraping a living for several years as a professional ballroom dancer, has just come into her inheritance. The future looks rosy—she can quit her job, she's going to tour Europe, and she's engaged to Gerald, an up-and-coming playwright (though the engagement is secret because his plays haven't yet caught on). Her only worry is her brother, Fillmore, whose crazy schemes for hitting it big in business usually go badly... until he invests in Gerald's latest play and it becomes wildly popular. But Sally's comfortable world is turned on its head when her friend Ginger Kemp brings her bad news. Suddenly Sally must decide what to do with the rest of her life—a life nothing like what she had dreamt of. The characters, though fitting into somewhat stereotypical roles, play their parts well and even with depth. Bruce Carmyle is brilliantly named and I can see him so clearly in my mind. Sally is sympathetically drawn and suffers serious loss and depression quite unlike Wodehouse's more generally known heroines. Ginger is one of those characters you start off feeling patronizing about and end up cheering madly on. Wodehouse also makes some keen observations about what people will sacrifice for their careers; rather chilling. And Uncle Donald, though a bit player, smacks of the comical relatives that will later populate Wodehouse's literary worlds. It was interesting to see a different side of Wodehouse—or perhaps a less-developed Wodehouse who hadn't yet found his footing as a master of comedy. It makes perfect sense that he would be able to write characters who go through devastating betrayals and touch the reader with sympathy rather than amusement. This insight is probably why Wodehouse can soar to such hilarious heights in his better-known works; it's grounded in a real knowledge of human emotion. I wouldn't exactly call this a serious novel—there's too much fun in it—but it's certainly the closest I've seen Wodehouse come to somber. And that's not a bad thing at all, once you know what to expect.more
This book is actually not as sweet as most Wodehouse stories. The mean people are meaner, more selfish and self-centered, rigid. Still, not surprisingly, all works out in the end and even the mean people are happy. The answer to what the Sally's true love should do with his life was a surprise to me; although it is suggested at the very beginning of the book.And there is a wonderfully brief description of a man, who I presume is the exact opposite of Mr. Wodehouse: "He was the sort of man who always has a pencil, and the backs of old envelopes never enter into his life." [p 60]more
As always, Wodehouse charms and entertains. His plots are fun, and his language is exquisite. Douglas Adams said Wodehouse was the greatest comedic writer in English, and I agree. Punch said criticizing Wodehouse was like taking a spade to a soufflé. Just enjoy the soufflé.more
Another Wodehouse classic, which this time sees the unfortunate Sally gaining and losing both a fortune and several suitors before finding domestic bliss in an unexpected quarter. Add in the difficulties of explaining the duties of a scrum-half to a bewildered American and keeping several large dogs - not to mention several Broadway actresses - under control, and copious quantities of Wodehouse wit and style, and you have the makings of a wonderful story.more
Fun story about Sally Nicholas who became an heiress, and then had to sope with her brother and the defection of her fiance, and two possible suitors. Set in France, England and America this is Wodehouse in gently funny mode. Good stuff, as ever!more
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