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Start Classics
A stunning work of scholarship, the Norton Critical Edition of The English Bible, King James Version, is the most accessible edition available.
Published: Start Classics an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781627936545
List price: $1.99
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It's really good to read the Holy Bible.I think it's so good on the others.Actually, I already reading it in another app such as YouVersion.Reading it each day, I feel the God's love in this. So I reading it now and feel the God's love, joy, peace and etc.more
I'm not even a believer any more, to be honest. But nevertheless, the Bible contains more great stories, history and wisdom than countless other books. Likewise, it's chockful of quotes we take for granted nowadays, and it's illuminating to see where they actually come from.more
What can you say about one of the most boring books of all time, yet still tops the charts for best-selling fiction. Firstly the writing style is atrocious. It's like twenty guys were only given part of the story and told to make it up and make it all fit. The inconsistencies are everywhere. They really needed a better editor.

And with so many different cooks the styles are everywhere. From dry accountant listing everything person and every thing in exacting detail, to a fantasy nut who introduces magical staffs and mythical beings who communicate through burning botany.

What happened to the plot? For the first section there is this evil overlord controlling every aspect of his minions life. What they can eat, what they can wear, who they must kill and subjugate next. I kept waiting for a big rebellion and maybe a lightsaber battle but they kept praising this guy. Can't they see they are just his puppets? And it goes on and on and on and on and on and... you get the drift. But thankfully it isn't all just lists, and doom and gloom and wait yes it is. There's some comedy pieces like this guy Noah who forgot all the dinosaurs and left them to die instead of taking them on his super arc. Must have been a cold-hearted guy and let them drown like the chick in Titanic did to Leo. So did Noah paint the dinosaurs like one of his "French girls"?

But then in the second half (or sequel I'm not quite sure. Maybe there was some writers strike between them) he just changes and it's as if he isn't even there anymore. Anti-climactic or what. Now his son is here to make the world a better place. I think the writers owe George Lucas some money for stealing his idea. This guy possesses all these superpowers but never comes up with a cool costume or superhero name. He just walks around, talking and occasionally doing little magic tricks. He could have headlined in Vegas! But no, he just tours the Middle East and forgets about the rest of the world. So in retaliation for not doing a gig in the Coliseum the Romans decide he has to die. And, lo and behold, he does! On a massive cross which must have hurt. But wait! He still has a magic trick up his sleeve (or robe or toga or whatever). He was only faking it. They take his "body" and put it in a cave and he does his Houdini trick and poof, he's gone. I'm thinking he was like the invisible man and ran off and married some little Arabian hottie. And story over.

So some minor magical fantasy pieces surrounded by the dullest of historical fantasy. At over 1000 pages, mostly with pretty small print, this tome makes for one hell of a paperweight and not much else. No wonder it's always left behind in hotels because people get 5 pages in and fall asleep. Do yourself a favour and go read some much better written historical fantasy. Or maybe Harry Potter. Hell maybe even Twilight. No scratch that, Twilight is still worse. Just.more
I grew up in a household in which this was the version around, and one of the few books around. So..I've read and reread. I think even if it is not to your religious taste it is an important thing to have read, to have tasted the glories of the psalms and the beauties of so many of the stories, the harshness of others, the bewildering complexity, the inspiration.more
The best prose in the English language; accept no substitute for the King James version (with more than a nod of appreciation to William Tyndale). How people can appreciate English literature without a knowledge of the cadences and phrases of this book I cannot imagine.more
Some lovely passages, but the story doesn't really hold together, and is directly contradicted by itself within the text.

this business of having bibles in the church pews should maybe be re-thought. Because most people sit in the same place every week. And if you're not engrossed in whatever is going on at any given moment, you can read from the bible and not get in trouble, sitting there quietly. So, if you sit in the same place all the time you can steadily work you way straight through, week by week. And if you do that? You won't like it nearly as much as if you just study little bits out of context. Well, your mileage may vary.more
EXTREMELY tedious. Some of the stories are interesting, but for the most part it just drags on and on. I wouldn't recommend it.more
Front to back read with many papers in a class in college: The Bible as Literature, taught by a Mormon who actually managed to keep his faith carefully out of the discussions. Found that despite my lack of religion, a number of portions were well worth reading and quite lyrical.If I never have to read the begats again, however, I'm OK with that.more
I have always been fascinated by the history of the English Bible. I remember being astonished when I first learned that the original 1611 King James Bible had marginal notes referencing variant readings, the literal Greek and Hebrew, and offering alternative renderings. Then came the day I got my hands on a reprint of an original 1611 King James Bible: I devoured my copy and enjoyed every minute I spent looking at it.If you are looking for a good gift for the studious, theology geek in your life (or for any pastor or Bible teacher, for that matter), a new mass-market reprint edition of the 1611 King James Bible from Zondervan is sure to please. This edition, published in honor of the 400th anniversary this year of the King James Version, has a soft feel to its hardcover which mimics both the look and feel of the original leather. This Bible is a more handy size at 8" x 5.4" than the original 12" x 16". It comes with the original typeset - Gothic letters for the main text, and Roman for what modern Bibles have in italics. And all 7,400 plus original marginal notes are also preserved. In addition, this edition includes what some of the other reprints leave out, namely the decorative genealogies and maps that precede the book of Genesis.The big omission of this book, is the Apocrypha. I guess since the volume is already 2.6" thick, they didn't want to make it even more bulky. And most Protestant readers won't miss it. Unfortunately there are some King James Only advocates who seem to be unaware that the original KJV contained the Apocrypha, and if they don't look too closely, this edition may bolster their mistaken assumption.That being said, the original maps, decorations and typeset, and all the strange archaisms -- like "ye" for "the", "f"s for "s"s, and the interchange of "i" and "j" and "u" and "v" -- will absolutely delight the lover of old books. It also illustrates that almost no one today truly uses a 1611 King James Bible.This Bible is inexpensively priced if you can still find it. Walmart was selling this over the summer for around $7.99. You may also be interested in "Visual History of the King James Bible, A: The Dramatic Story of the World's Best-Known Translation" by Donald Brake, if this title has caught your eye.Disclaimer: This book was provided by Zondervan. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.more
I'm an atheist, but I emphatically believe everyone of every kind of belief should read the Bible from cover to cover for three reasons. First, because to not know it means you're handicapped in understanding the world around you. About two billion out of almost seven billion on Earth today are Christians, more than any other faith. Followed by followers of Islam who number one-and-a-half billion--and Judeo-Christian beliefs were a major influence on their founder Muhammad. Muslims consider themselves, Christians and Jews as "People of the Book" with many stories and beliefs in common. Five of the seven continents are by and large Christian and a sixth, Africa, is about half Christian and the other half Muslim. And Asia? Well, given the legacy of imperialism and colonialism, Christianity certainly made its mark on its history. You're also going to be culturally impoverished if you don't read the Bible--the allusions and influences on literature, music, and art are profound.The second reason I think everyone should read it is that parts of it can claim to be among the oldest of surviving human texts, dating to perhaps the second millennium BCE and making those portions almost 4,000 years old. Few works--some Sanskrit, Sumerian and Egyptian works, such as the Pyramid Texts and the Epic of Gilgamesh--can claim to be older. There's something compelling about reading something so close to the very start of civilization. Finally, there is intrinsic worth in many of the works in the Bible. From my secular point of view, of varied value, with each book almost certainly written by very different authors over centuries--and very possibly not by whom the book is ascribed. But yes, parts are beautiful. I especially loved several of the Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes--and my favorites are Ruth and the erotic poem (yes, you read that right) the Song of Songs. If there's the Good, there's also from my perch the Bad and the Ugly. I think what gets to the heart of my problem with the Bible and its believers is the story in Genesis of how God tests Abraham by telling him to sacrifice his son Isaac--and is pleased when he proceeds to do so. As far as I'm concerned, if I was testing someone to be the chosen one, and they actually proceeded to sacrifice a child, I'd say, you most certainly DID NOT PASS THE TEST. The whole idea of obedience to God and "His Word" in the Bible as an ultimate good simply strikes me as repugnant. Furthermore, one of my more unpleasant surprises reading the Bible from cover to cover was the story of Jepthe's daughter in Judges. There a father makes a rash vow to sacrifice the first living thing to greet him when he comes home--who happens to be his young daughter. And this time God does not intervene. I think the story was such a shock to me because it's not a story that is emphasized in our culture. I may be an atheist, but I was raised a Catholic, attended catechism classes, and was required to take mandatory classes on Religion in my Catholic high school and college. I can't ever recall having heard of that story before coming upon it for myself. Leviticus also makes for unsettling reading. There is of course the much discussed passage condemning homosexuals to death. That's not the only Biblical law calling for the death penalty--it also falls on anyone taking the Lord's name in vain, breaking the sabbath, and of course "you shall not suffer a witch to live." About translations. Well, they make a big difference. I chose the Revised King James Version because it's the most widely used and influential among English-speaking Christians. However, seeking out other translations of the various books can really be illuminating. I remember in my high school religion class what we learned about Jesus' aphorism that "it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter heaven." Well, according to our teacher, that's a mistranslation that allowed the church to interpret it as meaning it's hard for a loaded camel to make it through a narrow passage--so you must unload those money bags to the church! But as it turns out, "camel" is just the idiom for "camel hair rope." So the proper aphorism should be "it is easier for a rope to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter Heaven." That's a lot harsher and bleaker--but also a much more elegant image. Finally, you're going to get more out of the Bible if you read through some guides and commentaries first or along with it. I read Asimov's Guide to the Bible--which was very readable and thorough in giving the historical and archeological context, but I'm sure is very dated now.more
It's not the bible if it's not King Jamesmore
Though this is an older copy, containing the family history going back to the 1800s, it still holds up. It is obvious that the previous owner used it well. Old style Bibles have lovely classy character of the old days. This copy has a concordance, and other bible helps such as maps, charts of key events, and a suggested yearly reading schedule. Truly this older copy makes me think about what the times were like during the early 20th century. There is no copywrite page.more
The one and only instruction book to life.more
The language of the King James has never been equalled, IMO. I collect different versions of bibles, and the one I use for study is the New RSV. But I love to read aloud from the King James.more
Of course this is really not a book, but a marvelous and challenging library of very ancient documents written, compiled and edited over many centuries by Jewish prophets, musicians, priests and sages. To regard it as fiction is to ignore the scholarship of many careful and highly accomplished historians, archaeologists, prelates and critics. To view it as complete or inerrant is to ignore its own content and testimony. The Jews have the distinction among all other nations of having (through Mary) brought forth Jesus, the Messiah whom I (among so many other witnesses) know to be the only begotten son of our Father in Heaven. The natural man resists and disbelieves this testimony and is at times only willing to point out the errors and contradictions which seem evident among these texts. And it was inevitable that through so many centuries some omissions and errors as well as uninspired interpolations must have occurred. Nevertheless there is a remarkable overall unity to this great collection which has brought many millions of many nations to worship our Heavenly Father and to testify that through faith in Jesus, repentance, baptism and the reception of the Holy Spirit their hearts have been changed so that they have no more desire to do any wrong but only to love and serve God and man. And at this point these wonderful scriptures become so much more understandable, inviting, motivating and comforting.more
This book is full of things most people don't even know are in the Bible. War, slaughter, slavery, prostitution, etc. Anyhoo, one has too look past these cultural differences, and inconsistencies of the texts due to the various writers experiencing the Word of God in different ways. I give it an A-. I will read it again soon.more
This book is as generally unreadable as most religious texts - lots of boring parts & odd ways of putting things. All the 'begats' seem extraneous to me, but I'm not a scholar. It has its moments & is worthwhile reading since most everyone I know is a Christian. There is a lot of action, sex & adventure, if you can get past the archaic wording. I especially like the Old Testament & reading about David, never cared much for Psalms & never understood Revelations - too much like reading a horoscope. I find the names really confusing. So many folks that seem to swap names around, especially in the New Testament. The overall messages from the Old & New Testaments seem quite at odds to me - completely different writing & the new one isn't nearly as exciting as the old.more
Poor physical condition but was the personal Bible of Mrs. Laura Lola Martin Venable { My Mother's personal Bible }The Bible my mother used to read to me as a child!! Very precious indeed! The King James Version...Red Letter Edition.more
Although newer translations are often more accurate, there is nothing like the language of the King James Version. Beatrix Potter is said to have read it whenever she needed "to chasten her style."more
A priceless, uplifting, testament to God's love for his children.more
To my mother, the KJV was always the best Bible text, for literary rather than scholarly reasons.more
No one should have to be reminded, the map is not the territory.more
translation i grew up with not the best but most beautiful languagemore
The definitive anthology of Ancient Hebrew poetry and literature - my favorites are the bits attributed to David and Luke, but there's a lot of good stuff in here. This is the classic 17th century translation which suffers a bit in clarity and accuracy but has its own poetry to it, and is worth reading just because of its allusive power - when you're reading it and stumble across a phrase you've heard in an X-Files episode or seen on a billboard, it just adds so much to the experience.more
The Holy Bible is a compilation of the texts thought to be most relevant to the Christian faith. Authorities differ regarding the material that should be included, as well as its authorship, provenance, and interpretation. This edition is based on one of the two or three widely-accepted standards, being comprised of 66 documents thought by many to have been composed by authors with unique insight into their faith.Although some of the material suffers from the plodding pace of The Silmarillion's less interesting chapters, the Bible also contains gripping tales of love, hate, lust, heroism, folly, and sacrifice. From the arrogance of King David, to the cowardice of the prophet Jonah, to the erotic longing of the writer of The Songs of Songs, to the zealotry of a martyred carpenter and his followers, the entire gamut of human experience is contained within this single, short volume. Of course, drawing material from dozens of authors writing in several genres over a long span of time does result in inconsistencies. Some critics (e.g. G.K. Chesterton) might claim that this diversity is a strength of the work; still, one can't help wondering whether, for example, the author of Genesis might have benefitted from the guidance of a good editor, given that the book is essentially cobbled together from multiple pre-existing stories. Likewise, the main character--known variously as Jehovah, The Lord, etc.--is portrayed in a variety of inconsistent ways; and it's unclear whether we are to take this as indicative of changes in his personality or changes in the perspective of the books' authors.The "Authorized" or "King James" version is, of course, the classic translation of this text into English. Although much of the language is now archaic and difficult for the modern reader to comprehend at first glance, the sheer poetic force of its best passages have shaped English literature in the centuries since its publication. Even for those who question its relevance, it remains required reading for those who aspire to call themselves "educated".more
Read all 30 reviews

Reviews

It's really good to read the Holy Bible.I think it's so good on the others.Actually, I already reading it in another app such as YouVersion.Reading it each day, I feel the God's love in this. So I reading it now and feel the God's love, joy, peace and etc.more
I'm not even a believer any more, to be honest. But nevertheless, the Bible contains more great stories, history and wisdom than countless other books. Likewise, it's chockful of quotes we take for granted nowadays, and it's illuminating to see where they actually come from.more
What can you say about one of the most boring books of all time, yet still tops the charts for best-selling fiction. Firstly the writing style is atrocious. It's like twenty guys were only given part of the story and told to make it up and make it all fit. The inconsistencies are everywhere. They really needed a better editor.

And with so many different cooks the styles are everywhere. From dry accountant listing everything person and every thing in exacting detail, to a fantasy nut who introduces magical staffs and mythical beings who communicate through burning botany.

What happened to the plot? For the first section there is this evil overlord controlling every aspect of his minions life. What they can eat, what they can wear, who they must kill and subjugate next. I kept waiting for a big rebellion and maybe a lightsaber battle but they kept praising this guy. Can't they see they are just his puppets? And it goes on and on and on and on and on and... you get the drift. But thankfully it isn't all just lists, and doom and gloom and wait yes it is. There's some comedy pieces like this guy Noah who forgot all the dinosaurs and left them to die instead of taking them on his super arc. Must have been a cold-hearted guy and let them drown like the chick in Titanic did to Leo. So did Noah paint the dinosaurs like one of his "French girls"?

But then in the second half (or sequel I'm not quite sure. Maybe there was some writers strike between them) he just changes and it's as if he isn't even there anymore. Anti-climactic or what. Now his son is here to make the world a better place. I think the writers owe George Lucas some money for stealing his idea. This guy possesses all these superpowers but never comes up with a cool costume or superhero name. He just walks around, talking and occasionally doing little magic tricks. He could have headlined in Vegas! But no, he just tours the Middle East and forgets about the rest of the world. So in retaliation for not doing a gig in the Coliseum the Romans decide he has to die. And, lo and behold, he does! On a massive cross which must have hurt. But wait! He still has a magic trick up his sleeve (or robe or toga or whatever). He was only faking it. They take his "body" and put it in a cave and he does his Houdini trick and poof, he's gone. I'm thinking he was like the invisible man and ran off and married some little Arabian hottie. And story over.

So some minor magical fantasy pieces surrounded by the dullest of historical fantasy. At over 1000 pages, mostly with pretty small print, this tome makes for one hell of a paperweight and not much else. No wonder it's always left behind in hotels because people get 5 pages in and fall asleep. Do yourself a favour and go read some much better written historical fantasy. Or maybe Harry Potter. Hell maybe even Twilight. No scratch that, Twilight is still worse. Just.more
I grew up in a household in which this was the version around, and one of the few books around. So..I've read and reread. I think even if it is not to your religious taste it is an important thing to have read, to have tasted the glories of the psalms and the beauties of so many of the stories, the harshness of others, the bewildering complexity, the inspiration.more
The best prose in the English language; accept no substitute for the King James version (with more than a nod of appreciation to William Tyndale). How people can appreciate English literature without a knowledge of the cadences and phrases of this book I cannot imagine.more
Some lovely passages, but the story doesn't really hold together, and is directly contradicted by itself within the text.

this business of having bibles in the church pews should maybe be re-thought. Because most people sit in the same place every week. And if you're not engrossed in whatever is going on at any given moment, you can read from the bible and not get in trouble, sitting there quietly. So, if you sit in the same place all the time you can steadily work you way straight through, week by week. And if you do that? You won't like it nearly as much as if you just study little bits out of context. Well, your mileage may vary.more
EXTREMELY tedious. Some of the stories are interesting, but for the most part it just drags on and on. I wouldn't recommend it.more
Front to back read with many papers in a class in college: The Bible as Literature, taught by a Mormon who actually managed to keep his faith carefully out of the discussions. Found that despite my lack of religion, a number of portions were well worth reading and quite lyrical.If I never have to read the begats again, however, I'm OK with that.more
I have always been fascinated by the history of the English Bible. I remember being astonished when I first learned that the original 1611 King James Bible had marginal notes referencing variant readings, the literal Greek and Hebrew, and offering alternative renderings. Then came the day I got my hands on a reprint of an original 1611 King James Bible: I devoured my copy and enjoyed every minute I spent looking at it.If you are looking for a good gift for the studious, theology geek in your life (or for any pastor or Bible teacher, for that matter), a new mass-market reprint edition of the 1611 King James Bible from Zondervan is sure to please. This edition, published in honor of the 400th anniversary this year of the King James Version, has a soft feel to its hardcover which mimics both the look and feel of the original leather. This Bible is a more handy size at 8" x 5.4" than the original 12" x 16". It comes with the original typeset - Gothic letters for the main text, and Roman for what modern Bibles have in italics. And all 7,400 plus original marginal notes are also preserved. In addition, this edition includes what some of the other reprints leave out, namely the decorative genealogies and maps that precede the book of Genesis.The big omission of this book, is the Apocrypha. I guess since the volume is already 2.6" thick, they didn't want to make it even more bulky. And most Protestant readers won't miss it. Unfortunately there are some King James Only advocates who seem to be unaware that the original KJV contained the Apocrypha, and if they don't look too closely, this edition may bolster their mistaken assumption.That being said, the original maps, decorations and typeset, and all the strange archaisms -- like "ye" for "the", "f"s for "s"s, and the interchange of "i" and "j" and "u" and "v" -- will absolutely delight the lover of old books. It also illustrates that almost no one today truly uses a 1611 King James Bible.This Bible is inexpensively priced if you can still find it. Walmart was selling this over the summer for around $7.99. You may also be interested in "Visual History of the King James Bible, A: The Dramatic Story of the World's Best-Known Translation" by Donald Brake, if this title has caught your eye.Disclaimer: This book was provided by Zondervan. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.more
I'm an atheist, but I emphatically believe everyone of every kind of belief should read the Bible from cover to cover for three reasons. First, because to not know it means you're handicapped in understanding the world around you. About two billion out of almost seven billion on Earth today are Christians, more than any other faith. Followed by followers of Islam who number one-and-a-half billion--and Judeo-Christian beliefs were a major influence on their founder Muhammad. Muslims consider themselves, Christians and Jews as "People of the Book" with many stories and beliefs in common. Five of the seven continents are by and large Christian and a sixth, Africa, is about half Christian and the other half Muslim. And Asia? Well, given the legacy of imperialism and colonialism, Christianity certainly made its mark on its history. You're also going to be culturally impoverished if you don't read the Bible--the allusions and influences on literature, music, and art are profound.The second reason I think everyone should read it is that parts of it can claim to be among the oldest of surviving human texts, dating to perhaps the second millennium BCE and making those portions almost 4,000 years old. Few works--some Sanskrit, Sumerian and Egyptian works, such as the Pyramid Texts and the Epic of Gilgamesh--can claim to be older. There's something compelling about reading something so close to the very start of civilization. Finally, there is intrinsic worth in many of the works in the Bible. From my secular point of view, of varied value, with each book almost certainly written by very different authors over centuries--and very possibly not by whom the book is ascribed. But yes, parts are beautiful. I especially loved several of the Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes--and my favorites are Ruth and the erotic poem (yes, you read that right) the Song of Songs. If there's the Good, there's also from my perch the Bad and the Ugly. I think what gets to the heart of my problem with the Bible and its believers is the story in Genesis of how God tests Abraham by telling him to sacrifice his son Isaac--and is pleased when he proceeds to do so. As far as I'm concerned, if I was testing someone to be the chosen one, and they actually proceeded to sacrifice a child, I'd say, you most certainly DID NOT PASS THE TEST. The whole idea of obedience to God and "His Word" in the Bible as an ultimate good simply strikes me as repugnant. Furthermore, one of my more unpleasant surprises reading the Bible from cover to cover was the story of Jepthe's daughter in Judges. There a father makes a rash vow to sacrifice the first living thing to greet him when he comes home--who happens to be his young daughter. And this time God does not intervene. I think the story was such a shock to me because it's not a story that is emphasized in our culture. I may be an atheist, but I was raised a Catholic, attended catechism classes, and was required to take mandatory classes on Religion in my Catholic high school and college. I can't ever recall having heard of that story before coming upon it for myself. Leviticus also makes for unsettling reading. There is of course the much discussed passage condemning homosexuals to death. That's not the only Biblical law calling for the death penalty--it also falls on anyone taking the Lord's name in vain, breaking the sabbath, and of course "you shall not suffer a witch to live." About translations. Well, they make a big difference. I chose the Revised King James Version because it's the most widely used and influential among English-speaking Christians. However, seeking out other translations of the various books can really be illuminating. I remember in my high school religion class what we learned about Jesus' aphorism that "it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter heaven." Well, according to our teacher, that's a mistranslation that allowed the church to interpret it as meaning it's hard for a loaded camel to make it through a narrow passage--so you must unload those money bags to the church! But as it turns out, "camel" is just the idiom for "camel hair rope." So the proper aphorism should be "it is easier for a rope to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter Heaven." That's a lot harsher and bleaker--but also a much more elegant image. Finally, you're going to get more out of the Bible if you read through some guides and commentaries first or along with it. I read Asimov's Guide to the Bible--which was very readable and thorough in giving the historical and archeological context, but I'm sure is very dated now.more
It's not the bible if it's not King Jamesmore
Though this is an older copy, containing the family history going back to the 1800s, it still holds up. It is obvious that the previous owner used it well. Old style Bibles have lovely classy character of the old days. This copy has a concordance, and other bible helps such as maps, charts of key events, and a suggested yearly reading schedule. Truly this older copy makes me think about what the times were like during the early 20th century. There is no copywrite page.more
The one and only instruction book to life.more
The language of the King James has never been equalled, IMO. I collect different versions of bibles, and the one I use for study is the New RSV. But I love to read aloud from the King James.more
Of course this is really not a book, but a marvelous and challenging library of very ancient documents written, compiled and edited over many centuries by Jewish prophets, musicians, priests and sages. To regard it as fiction is to ignore the scholarship of many careful and highly accomplished historians, archaeologists, prelates and critics. To view it as complete or inerrant is to ignore its own content and testimony. The Jews have the distinction among all other nations of having (through Mary) brought forth Jesus, the Messiah whom I (among so many other witnesses) know to be the only begotten son of our Father in Heaven. The natural man resists and disbelieves this testimony and is at times only willing to point out the errors and contradictions which seem evident among these texts. And it was inevitable that through so many centuries some omissions and errors as well as uninspired interpolations must have occurred. Nevertheless there is a remarkable overall unity to this great collection which has brought many millions of many nations to worship our Heavenly Father and to testify that through faith in Jesus, repentance, baptism and the reception of the Holy Spirit their hearts have been changed so that they have no more desire to do any wrong but only to love and serve God and man. And at this point these wonderful scriptures become so much more understandable, inviting, motivating and comforting.more
This book is full of things most people don't even know are in the Bible. War, slaughter, slavery, prostitution, etc. Anyhoo, one has too look past these cultural differences, and inconsistencies of the texts due to the various writers experiencing the Word of God in different ways. I give it an A-. I will read it again soon.more
This book is as generally unreadable as most religious texts - lots of boring parts & odd ways of putting things. All the 'begats' seem extraneous to me, but I'm not a scholar. It has its moments & is worthwhile reading since most everyone I know is a Christian. There is a lot of action, sex & adventure, if you can get past the archaic wording. I especially like the Old Testament & reading about David, never cared much for Psalms & never understood Revelations - too much like reading a horoscope. I find the names really confusing. So many folks that seem to swap names around, especially in the New Testament. The overall messages from the Old & New Testaments seem quite at odds to me - completely different writing & the new one isn't nearly as exciting as the old.more
Poor physical condition but was the personal Bible of Mrs. Laura Lola Martin Venable { My Mother's personal Bible }The Bible my mother used to read to me as a child!! Very precious indeed! The King James Version...Red Letter Edition.more
Although newer translations are often more accurate, there is nothing like the language of the King James Version. Beatrix Potter is said to have read it whenever she needed "to chasten her style."more
A priceless, uplifting, testament to God's love for his children.more
To my mother, the KJV was always the best Bible text, for literary rather than scholarly reasons.more
No one should have to be reminded, the map is not the territory.more
translation i grew up with not the best but most beautiful languagemore
The definitive anthology of Ancient Hebrew poetry and literature - my favorites are the bits attributed to David and Luke, but there's a lot of good stuff in here. This is the classic 17th century translation which suffers a bit in clarity and accuracy but has its own poetry to it, and is worth reading just because of its allusive power - when you're reading it and stumble across a phrase you've heard in an X-Files episode or seen on a billboard, it just adds so much to the experience.more
The Holy Bible is a compilation of the texts thought to be most relevant to the Christian faith. Authorities differ regarding the material that should be included, as well as its authorship, provenance, and interpretation. This edition is based on one of the two or three widely-accepted standards, being comprised of 66 documents thought by many to have been composed by authors with unique insight into their faith.Although some of the material suffers from the plodding pace of The Silmarillion's less interesting chapters, the Bible also contains gripping tales of love, hate, lust, heroism, folly, and sacrifice. From the arrogance of King David, to the cowardice of the prophet Jonah, to the erotic longing of the writer of The Songs of Songs, to the zealotry of a martyred carpenter and his followers, the entire gamut of human experience is contained within this single, short volume. Of course, drawing material from dozens of authors writing in several genres over a long span of time does result in inconsistencies. Some critics (e.g. G.K. Chesterton) might claim that this diversity is a strength of the work; still, one can't help wondering whether, for example, the author of Genesis might have benefitted from the guidance of a good editor, given that the book is essentially cobbled together from multiple pre-existing stories. Likewise, the main character--known variously as Jehovah, The Lord, etc.--is portrayed in a variety of inconsistent ways; and it's unclear whether we are to take this as indicative of changes in his personality or changes in the perspective of the books' authors.The "Authorized" or "King James" version is, of course, the classic translation of this text into English. Although much of the language is now archaic and difficult for the modern reader to comprehend at first glance, the sheer poetic force of its best passages have shaped English literature in the centuries since its publication. Even for those who question its relevance, it remains required reading for those who aspire to call themselves "educated".more
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