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First published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is regarded as Jack London's masterpiece. Based on London's experiences as a gold prospector in the Canadian wilderness and his ideas about nature and the struggle for existence, The Call of the Wild is a tale about unbreakable spirit and the fight for survival in the frozen Alaskan Klondike.
Published: Start Publishing LLC an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781625580702
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For some reason, though I had it when I was little, I never read White Fang. I think I was afraid of anthropomorphism. I figured it was going to be kind of cutesy, not really worth my time. Much as I liked Narnia and the like, in fiction based in the real world, I wanted more realism. I obviously never even started reading it. I think the book does a good job of portraying the wolf as a completely different creature from the human -- as well as a human can do without becoming a wolf for a while himself. The slow taming of White Fang seemed more or less realistic to me, and my heart was in my mouth in the last couple of pages. The book does make you care about the characters, particularly White Fang and his final master.

I was especially intrigued by the idea of wolves/dogs seeing humans as their gods. White Fang's view of his gods reminded me of the ancient Greek pantheon -- all those jealous and fighting gods, some more powerful than others...

I'm glad I finally did read this book.more
A terrific dog story, though hard to read at times because of all that Buck endures. I read it in the Library of America edition. Had never read it as a child as far as I recall; I note that some film versions are geared towards children and I can only assume (hope?) they have been bowdlerized; I wouldn't recommend this for children under 10 or 11 no matter their reading level.more
A classic by Jack London, White Fang could be considered the companion to London’s Call of the Wild, except in reserve. Whereas Buck from Call of the Wild finds his wild nature—White Fang finds his human love and is able to integrate into domestic life. White Fang is born in the wild to a wolf father and a half wolf mother. When he is made captive by humans, he is outcast from the other dogs because of his wildness. He learns to fight for his life. Finally, he has an opportunity to experience a new life away from the violence and savagery—but will he learn to embrace it is the question. I loved this book despite the violence and the brutality of the life led by White Fang—and the cruelty of the humans he encounters. A 4 out of 5 stars.more
Synopsis.......The story takes place in the extreme conditions of the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush, where strong sled dogs were in high demand. After Buck, a domesticated dog, is snatched from a pastoral ranch in California, he is sold into a brutal life as a sled dog. The novella details Buck's struggle to adjust and survive the cruel treatment he receives from humans, other dogs, and nature. He eventually sheds the veneer of civilization altogether and instead relies on primordial instincts and the lessons he has learned to become a respected and feared leader in the wild.Published back in 1903 after the author had spent sometime in the aforementioned Yukon.I was looking for something a little bit different and quick to read after getting bogged down by another book which I wasn't enjoying. I had previously heard of this book, hasn't everyone(?) but can't recall reading it ever during my near half-century of years, not even in the dim and distant days of school. Glad I made the effort though.Gripping, exciting, moving.......a testament of an indomitable spirit, bravery, determination, loyalty, fearlessness, and probably another dozen or so admirable attributes. Sad in places, but ultimately an uplifting and rewarding read.I wouldn't put it past me finding more from London in the future.4 from 5Down-loaded free from the internet.more
I enjoyed this story. The writing was clever and well-crafted, the dog's story was interesting, and the themes of the power of instinct and love - in nature and in between a human and an animal - this was all well-done. It was a very different book from what I usually read. The voices and the characters are all male; the story seems to be targeted at young men or boys. It certainly wasn't a favourite. Even so, it is hard to deny that this is a classic, and I am glad I took the time to read it.more
I first read this book when I was a young teenager. I remember crying then. I didn’t cry this time round but the actions in this book did strike a chord with me. I really do detest cruelty to animals; the cruelty in this book is paramount.White Fang is a product of his past. He has been taught to hate. He has been taught to survive at any measure. He is vicious. He is a killer! Yet he’s these things because he has to be. His other choice is to be the weak link and die.It’s a powerful story. Well told. No holding back; aimed straight for the jugular. The biggest lesson learned by reading White Fang is that you can beat an animal (and I believe this relates to people too) into doing what you want but loving them produces a much better (long-lasting) result. A beaten animal will do as you want, but will rip your throat out if given the opportunity. A loved animal will be faithful, loyal and forever.There’s little more to be said about this book except that it’s worth reading. I highly recommend it.more
The Call of the Wild by Jack London is a book I have long wanted to read, somehow missing this classic as a younger reader. Now that I have read it, I am glad that this was missed in my younger days as I don’t know if I would have been able to handle the animal cruelty that plays such a large part of this story. Maybe we were tougher years ago as many of the great animal classic stories like this one, Black Beauty and Beautiful Joe have many scenes that today would not be accepted in a children’s story.The story of Buck, being snatched from his easy life in California and being taken to work in the gold fields, shows him to be a special dog, dominant and intelligent, and, after finding out how cruel man can be, he learns to read both people and the situations that arise in his life. The story follows Buck as he is passed through various owners, some cruel, some indifferent and one that Buck learns to love. All the while, deep inside Buck comes a call, a desire to run free in the wilderness.At my much advanced age, I can now appreciate Jack London’s writing, especially when describing the Alaskan wilderness. The story is fast paced with excellent action sequences and overall I would class this a great read, if, and it’s a big if, you can face the brutality of what Buck goes through. The themes of like natured beasts calling out to each other, and the luring back to the primordial life that exists deep in memory are a little dated but overall this is a compelling read. London uses language like a poet, simple, at times savage but always rich in imagery.more
A romantic view of Alaska and the dogs that helped the early explorers and gold seekers open up the land to new settlers.more
The story is written from the perspective of Buck, the dog. He is large, he is faithful and pragmatic, and he is kidnapped by a worker on the ranch he lives on, and sold to a trader who sends him north to run with a team dragging sleds. Poor Buck is mistreated, and faces a hard run. It is not just humans who are cruel to him, other dogs resent his size and presence, and battles for position as alpha male take place. The dog team are run to the ground, and Bucks saving grace is his size, strength and stamina. He is passed to and from inept and cruel owners until he finally meets an owner he can trust and bond with.It's a nice, if somewhat violent, story. Nothing too deep, but a read that carries you along.more
Both of these tales (White Fang & Call of the Wild), one of a civilized dog who embraces the wild after he is stolen and one of a wild dog tamed by the love of a man...are both masterpieces that embrace the animal and flawed humanity in man and the the beasts that show us so and brave so much. Both are raw, emotional tales told in sparse, beautiful language that gnaw at you long after you put them down. First read at age 12, and enjoyed again as much at 41.more
This is one of those books that I might have read before and forgotten about it. This was a pretty good book, I think my favorite part was that I picked up a new vocabulary word because the author over used it... "virility."more
Book ReviewBy: Evan MercadoThis is a classic story about survival (in my eyes). This starts off interesting with a pack of 6 wolfs, and ends up with, well, you have to read the book for that :). It ends up in a good home after attacking it's owner's family. No one knows for sure, but the other wolfs might still be alive. Only 1 dies that I know of) the rest (except for 1 who goes solo) and they travel in a pack of 4. That until they came across this tribe of Indians (I called them Indians because in the book they were called Indians, if that offends anyone).Thats when one wolf turns on the rest of it’s pack, and leaves. It found a home, owner , until a Dog Musher wants this dog. But the owner (Scott) keeps the dog and moves to Sierra Vista, with his family.more
The Call of the WildYamamoto, MitsuAR Quiz # 30529 EN FICTIONIL: MG - BL: 5.5 AR Points 2.0AR Quiz Types RP, VPThoroughly enjoyed this retelling of the classic Jack London novel about Buck, part St. Bernard, part wolf and part super hero. I give it 4 stars and would recommend this book to all students and adults alike.I thought the graphics on each page were well done and helped readers visualize the rugged and difficult life Buck is thrown into without warning. He is abducted from a world of comfort on Judge Miller's farm, to a world where his survival depends on his instincts, guile and ability to adapt quickly to his changing circumstances.Fascinating that Mr. London could have written this novel in the early 1900's and the novel remains so timeless. I would hope that students today can still relate to such a beloved dog and the people and animals he meets along his journey to finding his true nature. It was fun to reread this inspirational story once again.I love the way good and evil are portrayed through both men and animals. I particularly liked watching Buck overcome these evils through both patience and his persistence until ultimately becoming a leader among the sled dogs.When Buck is befriended by John Thornton, we get lulled into a false sense of security thinking Buck will now be forever protected by this great man. But the greatest test of Buck's life is yet to come, and in the final climactic chapters, Bucks true superhero nature comes out as he defends his companion to the end.more
Though I responded with boyish enthusiasm to 'The Call of the Wild' many years ago and it re-echoes in memory, I had not read 'White Fang' or any of London's other books until now. I don't think 'White Fang' quite compares with its companion novel stylistically - the later chapters in particular are too obviously allegorical and predictable - but it is equally rugged, energetic and thrilling. London excels at seeing the world through the dog wolf's eyes, and he also manages the difficult and necessary task of shifting the narrative viewpoint occasionally to move the story along at critical points. He is least successful with his human portrayals, especially the dialogue which reads as if it has been written on cardboard with too thick a pen, but he is entirely at home in the Yukon where it stands on the cusp between traditional existence and 'civilisation' in the trail of the gold rush. His evocation of the animal and human struggles in these harsh surroundings - with very survival constantly under threat - is supremely vivid and vital, inked as it were in blood.more
White Fang is a very good book which I recommend to 4th grade and higher readers. I think anybody would love to read this action-packed book!!!!!!!!more
As London might have put it, a rattling good yarn, and an extraordinarily interesting study of canine character. Buck, the pet dog of a wealthy family in central California, is kidnapped, sold, and transported to the Yukon to be used as a sled dog. He suffers at the hands of men and the paws (and teeth) of other dogs, but eventually emerges as a supreme sled dog. Then, he is saved from near death by a man he comes to love as his master, and lives and works with his master and his master's partners, who mine gold in the Canadian wilderness. More and more, however, he is drawn by "the call of the wild", the lure of a truly wild life as lived by wolves. Eventually, after his master is killed in an Indian attack, he follows the call.The book was written in 1903, and the style and context show it (interesting to remember that a big chunk of North America was a trackless waste that recently). As a dog story, however, it is remarkably up to date, focussing on the dog's inheritance from its wolf ancestors. That's just now being confirmed by genetic analysis, as is the fact that some dogs (like huskies) are genetically much closer to wolves than some other breeds. A great read for dog and adventure loving kids, but also a great read for this almost-70 New Yorker.more
I never got around to reading Jack London when I was younger, apparently missing out, as I have recently learned that most American high schoolers have London shoved down their throats at least once if not a half dozen times. I'm a bit glad I was spared the exercise because I don't think I would have appreciated it as much as I do now. I am sure one can say that about most books one reads in their younger years. The story of Buck is short but still very good. I wonder if there is an earlier book of seriousness and renown that was written from the view point of dog. The story is a bit odd for Jack London given his political views. Buck is a "king" and a protagonist. David Vann does a decent job illustrating this point in his introduction of the Folio Society edition. He also points out Buck's "Grendel" qualities near the end, which has the book ending on a bit of sad mystery, instead of a more upbeat "everyone lived happily ever after" conclusion. A few fine paragraphs stood out like this one:"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." These ruminations on the truth of nature confirmed for me that the 6 months Jack London spent traipsing around Alaska were not in vain.more
This novel is one of my favorite pieces of American literature. Set in the rugged and bitterly cold Yukon, London weaves a tale of adventure through the eyes of Buck, a St. Bernard/Retriever mix, as he is abducted from a relative dog life of luxury and made a beast of burden on a sled team during the Alaskan gold rush. As the book follows the owners in Buck's life, one sees how the environment of the Yukon makes survival of the fittest a physical as well as mentally challenging game. This is a great read for dog lovers, and adventurers young and old---a time worn classic.more
I read this with my husband. I dont like the racial undertones in Jack london's work. That aside, i wasnt all bad. My husband liked it. Of course he likes anything natureishmore
My father gave this book to me as "one every man should read". I have to agree. There is something about the primal nature of this story, which follows the journey of a dog,that made me want to travel and become one with the earth. Although I enjoyed reading this novel, I would have liked to know more about the human characters rather than the dogs. Indeed the writing from the dog's perspective is great, but I usually find it easier to relate to humans.more
I think the author really expressed the virtue of loyalty in his book. Buck never left Thorton, and even after he died returned there every year. Another theme is survival of the fittest. The author creates many tests for Buck's strength and perseverance. Buck passed all these and the author made it clear. I would recommend this book to anyone.more
My third book by the author, and a possible reread (I remember some parts but not sure if I ever finished it).Basically the tale tells the life of Buck ( a Saint Bernard-Scotch shepherd dog) and the life he leads. At times harrowing, we follow Buck as he is stolen from a comfortable life and sold as a sledge dog. He rediscovers the primordial instinct for survival and endures all hardships put upon him. This includes being beaten by humans, driven to near death on the sledge and still having to fight for mastery over his fellows canines.Not exactly a light-hearted read with death on nearly every page, but an excellent representation of the attitudes of the early 20th century and the will to survive.Would I recommend it? Everytime.Would I reread it? One day.Am I glad I read it? Definitelymore
Having only a cursory knowledge of London's work, I decided to choose White Fang first when considering which public domain works to record as audio books. I've only "read" it once, but have listened to it probably a half-dozen more times in the editing process. It's very well written, accessible, and very involved. At no time did I feel as if London was writing without a clear purpose and passion. Excellent read and rather timeless. As a side note, there are some very decent young adult versions with illustrations and even one with a sidebar defining more complex words. Very useful for young readers.more
Jack London imports Social Darwinist credo, used more clumsily and less divertingly by authors such as Frank Norris, into letters with fervor, conviction, and skill. We encounter White Fang, a part domestic dog and mostly wolf dog that lives with a pack in the wilderness and whose mother had once been domesticated by the Native Americans. As in the case of its companion volume, "Call of the Wild," (where the dog Buck moves from domesticity to the wild, as opposed to vice versa), White Fang has abusive owners who want White Fang to fight for money, but White Fang is rescued by a man who is called, under the regime of London's casually assumed racism, one of the "white human gods." A great tale, and a book that serves as an excellent introduction to literature for young adolescents, bit can be relished at all ages.more
Read all 108 reviews

Reviews

For some reason, though I had it when I was little, I never read White Fang. I think I was afraid of anthropomorphism. I figured it was going to be kind of cutesy, not really worth my time. Much as I liked Narnia and the like, in fiction based in the real world, I wanted more realism. I obviously never even started reading it. I think the book does a good job of portraying the wolf as a completely different creature from the human -- as well as a human can do without becoming a wolf for a while himself. The slow taming of White Fang seemed more or less realistic to me, and my heart was in my mouth in the last couple of pages. The book does make you care about the characters, particularly White Fang and his final master.

I was especially intrigued by the idea of wolves/dogs seeing humans as their gods. White Fang's view of his gods reminded me of the ancient Greek pantheon -- all those jealous and fighting gods, some more powerful than others...

I'm glad I finally did read this book.more
A terrific dog story, though hard to read at times because of all that Buck endures. I read it in the Library of America edition. Had never read it as a child as far as I recall; I note that some film versions are geared towards children and I can only assume (hope?) they have been bowdlerized; I wouldn't recommend this for children under 10 or 11 no matter their reading level.more
A classic by Jack London, White Fang could be considered the companion to London’s Call of the Wild, except in reserve. Whereas Buck from Call of the Wild finds his wild nature—White Fang finds his human love and is able to integrate into domestic life. White Fang is born in the wild to a wolf father and a half wolf mother. When he is made captive by humans, he is outcast from the other dogs because of his wildness. He learns to fight for his life. Finally, he has an opportunity to experience a new life away from the violence and savagery—but will he learn to embrace it is the question. I loved this book despite the violence and the brutality of the life led by White Fang—and the cruelty of the humans he encounters. A 4 out of 5 stars.more
Synopsis.......The story takes place in the extreme conditions of the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush, where strong sled dogs were in high demand. After Buck, a domesticated dog, is snatched from a pastoral ranch in California, he is sold into a brutal life as a sled dog. The novella details Buck's struggle to adjust and survive the cruel treatment he receives from humans, other dogs, and nature. He eventually sheds the veneer of civilization altogether and instead relies on primordial instincts and the lessons he has learned to become a respected and feared leader in the wild.Published back in 1903 after the author had spent sometime in the aforementioned Yukon.I was looking for something a little bit different and quick to read after getting bogged down by another book which I wasn't enjoying. I had previously heard of this book, hasn't everyone(?) but can't recall reading it ever during my near half-century of years, not even in the dim and distant days of school. Glad I made the effort though.Gripping, exciting, moving.......a testament of an indomitable spirit, bravery, determination, loyalty, fearlessness, and probably another dozen or so admirable attributes. Sad in places, but ultimately an uplifting and rewarding read.I wouldn't put it past me finding more from London in the future.4 from 5Down-loaded free from the internet.more
I enjoyed this story. The writing was clever and well-crafted, the dog's story was interesting, and the themes of the power of instinct and love - in nature and in between a human and an animal - this was all well-done. It was a very different book from what I usually read. The voices and the characters are all male; the story seems to be targeted at young men or boys. It certainly wasn't a favourite. Even so, it is hard to deny that this is a classic, and I am glad I took the time to read it.more
I first read this book when I was a young teenager. I remember crying then. I didn’t cry this time round but the actions in this book did strike a chord with me. I really do detest cruelty to animals; the cruelty in this book is paramount.White Fang is a product of his past. He has been taught to hate. He has been taught to survive at any measure. He is vicious. He is a killer! Yet he’s these things because he has to be. His other choice is to be the weak link and die.It’s a powerful story. Well told. No holding back; aimed straight for the jugular. The biggest lesson learned by reading White Fang is that you can beat an animal (and I believe this relates to people too) into doing what you want but loving them produces a much better (long-lasting) result. A beaten animal will do as you want, but will rip your throat out if given the opportunity. A loved animal will be faithful, loyal and forever.There’s little more to be said about this book except that it’s worth reading. I highly recommend it.more
The Call of the Wild by Jack London is a book I have long wanted to read, somehow missing this classic as a younger reader. Now that I have read it, I am glad that this was missed in my younger days as I don’t know if I would have been able to handle the animal cruelty that plays such a large part of this story. Maybe we were tougher years ago as many of the great animal classic stories like this one, Black Beauty and Beautiful Joe have many scenes that today would not be accepted in a children’s story.The story of Buck, being snatched from his easy life in California and being taken to work in the gold fields, shows him to be a special dog, dominant and intelligent, and, after finding out how cruel man can be, he learns to read both people and the situations that arise in his life. The story follows Buck as he is passed through various owners, some cruel, some indifferent and one that Buck learns to love. All the while, deep inside Buck comes a call, a desire to run free in the wilderness.At my much advanced age, I can now appreciate Jack London’s writing, especially when describing the Alaskan wilderness. The story is fast paced with excellent action sequences and overall I would class this a great read, if, and it’s a big if, you can face the brutality of what Buck goes through. The themes of like natured beasts calling out to each other, and the luring back to the primordial life that exists deep in memory are a little dated but overall this is a compelling read. London uses language like a poet, simple, at times savage but always rich in imagery.more
A romantic view of Alaska and the dogs that helped the early explorers and gold seekers open up the land to new settlers.more
The story is written from the perspective of Buck, the dog. He is large, he is faithful and pragmatic, and he is kidnapped by a worker on the ranch he lives on, and sold to a trader who sends him north to run with a team dragging sleds. Poor Buck is mistreated, and faces a hard run. It is not just humans who are cruel to him, other dogs resent his size and presence, and battles for position as alpha male take place. The dog team are run to the ground, and Bucks saving grace is his size, strength and stamina. He is passed to and from inept and cruel owners until he finally meets an owner he can trust and bond with.It's a nice, if somewhat violent, story. Nothing too deep, but a read that carries you along.more
Both of these tales (White Fang & Call of the Wild), one of a civilized dog who embraces the wild after he is stolen and one of a wild dog tamed by the love of a man...are both masterpieces that embrace the animal and flawed humanity in man and the the beasts that show us so and brave so much. Both are raw, emotional tales told in sparse, beautiful language that gnaw at you long after you put them down. First read at age 12, and enjoyed again as much at 41.more
This is one of those books that I might have read before and forgotten about it. This was a pretty good book, I think my favorite part was that I picked up a new vocabulary word because the author over used it... "virility."more
Book ReviewBy: Evan MercadoThis is a classic story about survival (in my eyes). This starts off interesting with a pack of 6 wolfs, and ends up with, well, you have to read the book for that :). It ends up in a good home after attacking it's owner's family. No one knows for sure, but the other wolfs might still be alive. Only 1 dies that I know of) the rest (except for 1 who goes solo) and they travel in a pack of 4. That until they came across this tribe of Indians (I called them Indians because in the book they were called Indians, if that offends anyone).Thats when one wolf turns on the rest of it’s pack, and leaves. It found a home, owner , until a Dog Musher wants this dog. But the owner (Scott) keeps the dog and moves to Sierra Vista, with his family.more
The Call of the WildYamamoto, MitsuAR Quiz # 30529 EN FICTIONIL: MG - BL: 5.5 AR Points 2.0AR Quiz Types RP, VPThoroughly enjoyed this retelling of the classic Jack London novel about Buck, part St. Bernard, part wolf and part super hero. I give it 4 stars and would recommend this book to all students and adults alike.I thought the graphics on each page were well done and helped readers visualize the rugged and difficult life Buck is thrown into without warning. He is abducted from a world of comfort on Judge Miller's farm, to a world where his survival depends on his instincts, guile and ability to adapt quickly to his changing circumstances.Fascinating that Mr. London could have written this novel in the early 1900's and the novel remains so timeless. I would hope that students today can still relate to such a beloved dog and the people and animals he meets along his journey to finding his true nature. It was fun to reread this inspirational story once again.I love the way good and evil are portrayed through both men and animals. I particularly liked watching Buck overcome these evils through both patience and his persistence until ultimately becoming a leader among the sled dogs.When Buck is befriended by John Thornton, we get lulled into a false sense of security thinking Buck will now be forever protected by this great man. But the greatest test of Buck's life is yet to come, and in the final climactic chapters, Bucks true superhero nature comes out as he defends his companion to the end.more
Though I responded with boyish enthusiasm to 'The Call of the Wild' many years ago and it re-echoes in memory, I had not read 'White Fang' or any of London's other books until now. I don't think 'White Fang' quite compares with its companion novel stylistically - the later chapters in particular are too obviously allegorical and predictable - but it is equally rugged, energetic and thrilling. London excels at seeing the world through the dog wolf's eyes, and he also manages the difficult and necessary task of shifting the narrative viewpoint occasionally to move the story along at critical points. He is least successful with his human portrayals, especially the dialogue which reads as if it has been written on cardboard with too thick a pen, but he is entirely at home in the Yukon where it stands on the cusp between traditional existence and 'civilisation' in the trail of the gold rush. His evocation of the animal and human struggles in these harsh surroundings - with very survival constantly under threat - is supremely vivid and vital, inked as it were in blood.more
White Fang is a very good book which I recommend to 4th grade and higher readers. I think anybody would love to read this action-packed book!!!!!!!!more
As London might have put it, a rattling good yarn, and an extraordinarily interesting study of canine character. Buck, the pet dog of a wealthy family in central California, is kidnapped, sold, and transported to the Yukon to be used as a sled dog. He suffers at the hands of men and the paws (and teeth) of other dogs, but eventually emerges as a supreme sled dog. Then, he is saved from near death by a man he comes to love as his master, and lives and works with his master and his master's partners, who mine gold in the Canadian wilderness. More and more, however, he is drawn by "the call of the wild", the lure of a truly wild life as lived by wolves. Eventually, after his master is killed in an Indian attack, he follows the call.The book was written in 1903, and the style and context show it (interesting to remember that a big chunk of North America was a trackless waste that recently). As a dog story, however, it is remarkably up to date, focussing on the dog's inheritance from its wolf ancestors. That's just now being confirmed by genetic analysis, as is the fact that some dogs (like huskies) are genetically much closer to wolves than some other breeds. A great read for dog and adventure loving kids, but also a great read for this almost-70 New Yorker.more
I never got around to reading Jack London when I was younger, apparently missing out, as I have recently learned that most American high schoolers have London shoved down their throats at least once if not a half dozen times. I'm a bit glad I was spared the exercise because I don't think I would have appreciated it as much as I do now. I am sure one can say that about most books one reads in their younger years. The story of Buck is short but still very good. I wonder if there is an earlier book of seriousness and renown that was written from the view point of dog. The story is a bit odd for Jack London given his political views. Buck is a "king" and a protagonist. David Vann does a decent job illustrating this point in his introduction of the Folio Society edition. He also points out Buck's "Grendel" qualities near the end, which has the book ending on a bit of sad mystery, instead of a more upbeat "everyone lived happily ever after" conclusion. A few fine paragraphs stood out like this one:"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." These ruminations on the truth of nature confirmed for me that the 6 months Jack London spent traipsing around Alaska were not in vain.more
This novel is one of my favorite pieces of American literature. Set in the rugged and bitterly cold Yukon, London weaves a tale of adventure through the eyes of Buck, a St. Bernard/Retriever mix, as he is abducted from a relative dog life of luxury and made a beast of burden on a sled team during the Alaskan gold rush. As the book follows the owners in Buck's life, one sees how the environment of the Yukon makes survival of the fittest a physical as well as mentally challenging game. This is a great read for dog lovers, and adventurers young and old---a time worn classic.more
I read this with my husband. I dont like the racial undertones in Jack london's work. That aside, i wasnt all bad. My husband liked it. Of course he likes anything natureishmore
My father gave this book to me as "one every man should read". I have to agree. There is something about the primal nature of this story, which follows the journey of a dog,that made me want to travel and become one with the earth. Although I enjoyed reading this novel, I would have liked to know more about the human characters rather than the dogs. Indeed the writing from the dog's perspective is great, but I usually find it easier to relate to humans.more
I think the author really expressed the virtue of loyalty in his book. Buck never left Thorton, and even after he died returned there every year. Another theme is survival of the fittest. The author creates many tests for Buck's strength and perseverance. Buck passed all these and the author made it clear. I would recommend this book to anyone.more
My third book by the author, and a possible reread (I remember some parts but not sure if I ever finished it).Basically the tale tells the life of Buck ( a Saint Bernard-Scotch shepherd dog) and the life he leads. At times harrowing, we follow Buck as he is stolen from a comfortable life and sold as a sledge dog. He rediscovers the primordial instinct for survival and endures all hardships put upon him. This includes being beaten by humans, driven to near death on the sledge and still having to fight for mastery over his fellows canines.Not exactly a light-hearted read with death on nearly every page, but an excellent representation of the attitudes of the early 20th century and the will to survive.Would I recommend it? Everytime.Would I reread it? One day.Am I glad I read it? Definitelymore
Having only a cursory knowledge of London's work, I decided to choose White Fang first when considering which public domain works to record as audio books. I've only "read" it once, but have listened to it probably a half-dozen more times in the editing process. It's very well written, accessible, and very involved. At no time did I feel as if London was writing without a clear purpose and passion. Excellent read and rather timeless. As a side note, there are some very decent young adult versions with illustrations and even one with a sidebar defining more complex words. Very useful for young readers.more
Jack London imports Social Darwinist credo, used more clumsily and less divertingly by authors such as Frank Norris, into letters with fervor, conviction, and skill. We encounter White Fang, a part domestic dog and mostly wolf dog that lives with a pack in the wilderness and whose mother had once been domesticated by the Native Americans. As in the case of its companion volume, "Call of the Wild," (where the dog Buck moves from domesticity to the wild, as opposed to vice versa), White Fang has abusive owners who want White Fang to fight for money, but White Fang is rescued by a man who is called, under the regime of London's casually assumed racism, one of the "white human gods." A great tale, and a book that serves as an excellent introduction to literature for young adolescents, bit can be relished at all ages.more
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