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From the Publisher

The Bohemian Girl
'A Death in the Desert'
The Enchanted Bluff
Eric Hermannson's Soul
Flavia and her Artists
The Garden Lodge
The Marriage of Phaedra
On the Divide
Paul's Case
The Sculptor's Funeral
A Wagner Matinee
Published: Start Classics an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781609773366
List price: $1.99
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