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From the Publisher

In Notes on My Books (1920), Joseph Conrad recounts his experiences with the writing process. He recounts in detail his intentions and aspirations for each of his major works.
Published: Start Classics an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781633550896
List price: $1.99
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