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"Every experience God gives us . . . is the perfect preparation for the future only He can see."--Corrie ten Boom

Corrie ten Boom was a Dutch watchmaker who became a heroine of the Resistance, a survivor of Hitler's concentration camps, and one of the most remarkable evangelists of the twentieth century. In World War II she and her family risked their lives to help Jews and underground workers escape from the Nazis, and for their work they were tested in the infamous Nazi death camps. Only Corrie among her family survived to tell the story of how faith ultimately triumphs over evil.

Here is the riveting account of how Corrie and her family were able to save many of God's chosen people. For 35 years millions have seen that there is no pit so deep that God's love is not deeper still. Now The Hiding Place, repackaged for a new generation of readers, continues to declare that God's love will overcome, heal, and restore.

"A groundbreaking book that shines a clear light on one of the darkest moments of history."--Philip Yancey, author, The Jesus I Never Knew

"Ten Boom's classic is even more relevant to the present hour than at the time of its writing. We . . . need to be inspired afresh by the courage manifested by her family."--Jack W. Hayford, president, International Foursquare Church; chancellor, The King's College and Seminary

"The Hiding Place is a classic that begs revisiting. Corrie ten Boom lived the deeper life with God. Her gripping story of love in action will challenge and inspire you!"--Joyce Meyer, best-selling author and Bible teacher

Topics: World War II, The Holocaust, Christianity, Concentration Camps, Nazis, Judaism, In Hiding, Women in History, Inspirational, Heartfelt, Germany, Forgiveness, and Sisters

Published: Baker Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9781441232885
List price: $12.99
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I read this book out loud to my husband and daughter on a road trip. I'd been trying to get my husband to read it for years. I re-read this book every year and have since I was 11. This book is remarkable. Even for people who are not religious. It will change your life and how you see the world. more
beautiful and transparent storymore
A must read for every one and any one who wishes to dive deeper and go all the way with God. Drinking of His love, accepting His forgiveness and coming under a sense of His grace, this was Corrie’s life!more
What makes this particular book different from other (better) stories about the Holocaust is that it's from the perspective of a Christian woman who was interned. While it's extremely important for us not to forget that one group of people was specifically targeted (Jews) it's also important for us to realize that this horrible thing went beyond that. This horrible thing didn't just affect "them"/"those other people" (oh isn't that sad?, what's for dinner?") but it affected the whole world. But non-Jews sometimes need more than an abstract reminder of how the Holocaust affected us all. Perhaps this first person narrative might bring it home.

It's not that well written but it's interesting and informative and I enjoyed it.more
As a fellow believer, I found her account of such love in the midst of such evil to be profoundly moving. I feel that she spared her readers some (but certainly not all!) of the grittier details, but that was OK; I was able to extrapolate, younger readers would be spared some of the horror.more
While I was expecting to be moved by this book, as I have been with every holocaust memoir I've read, I wasn't expecting to be as deeply moved as I was. The faith of the ten Boom family, and the way it informs their decisions to do the right thing, regardless of personal risk, is humbling. This is not to say Ms. ten Boom does not have moments of despair -- how could she not given what happened to her, to her family and to her neighbors and those she helped? It is the moments of despair which allow reader to identify with the her and her sister and father.A remarkable book about the light that remains alight even in the darkest of nights.more
This is the true story of Corrie and her family during WWII. The terrible things that they went through make our troubles seem as nothing. She tells of her faith and trust in God and how it grew to the point of forgiveness and caring and compassion for those who had so mistreated her and so many others. It gave me a real example of the extreme battle of good and evil that we face in this world and how through Christ we are more than conquerors. LKCmore
This is my second favorite of all time. Thank you to my old carpooler, Victoria for sharing! Such an amazing story of survival, grace, mercy, forgiveness, and love. This story will stay with me for life and has changed me in many wonderful ways. I try to always look at the positive side to everything thanks to Ms. ten Boom and her sister. Warning-the first 1/2 of the book can drag a bit, but the second 1/2 flys by and hits you right between the eyes!more
The Hiding Place tells the story of the TenBoom family who were Dutch Christians in Holland during the Second world War and how they committed their lives to protecting God's people- the Jews- from the Nazis. "Me and my family would concider it an honour to die for the Jews" Said Papa TenBoom, and die he would.more
This is the story of Corrie ten Boom, a self-described "spinster" watchmaker who lived with her father and sister and was pushing fifty when she became part of the Dutch Resistance helping to hide Jews from the Nazis. Eventually betrayed, she wound up in a Gestapo prison for a few months, then doing forced labor in the Vught Concentration Camp, which harsh as it was, was paradisaical compared to where she next wound up until released, the notorious Ravensbruck Concentration Camp. This is her first person account, written decades after the fact with the help of John and Elizabeth Sherrill. It got off to what I found a slow start in the first four chapters which tells of the life of her and her family before World War II. I thought it picked up in pace a great deal in the later chapters once it began to tell of her involvement aiding Jews in the Underground, and from that moment I was completely engrossed--and indeed the story, particularly before they were betrayed to the Nazis, sometimes surprised me with its warmth and humor. Her father, for instance, never really understood why all the Resistance people were calling themselves "Smit" and kept asking whether they were related to this or that Smit family he knew.I picked up the book because it was recommended on the Ultimate Reading List in the "Inspirational Non-fiction" section. For "inspirational" read "religious" and almost always "Christian" and I indeed found it in the "Christian Inspiration" section. Some reviews complained about the religiosity, but it really didn't bother me--and I'm an atheist with little patience when I feel I'm being preached at. Perhaps it's just that I took this in stride as part and parcel of Miss Ten Boom. That faith was just as much as the foundation of her thinking and deeds as Hinduism was for Ghandi or Buddhism for the Dalai Llama. There's nothing smug or self-righteous in her tone. Nor did she come across as "goodie two shoes" to me--she sometimes understandably struggled with anger and fear. She's human--although in my book still a hero. I even saw one review that called her a "bigot." That couldn't be further from the truth. The Ten Booms saved many Jews, hiding them in their own home at great risk to themselves, tried to serve them kosher food when they could, celebrated the Sabbath with them and Jewish holidays. I saw no sign of bigotry towards those of other beliefs. Having a strong faith that a person takes seriously in deciding how to act does not make one a bigot. Anyone who mistakes that for bigotry has their own issues with anti-Christian bigotry in my opinion.On the other hand, I do agree with one reviewer that I suspect that her Christian faith did "sugar coat" things more than a little and probably colored her recollection. I don't think Ten Boom ever consciously shaded the truth, but especially given this was recounted almost thirty years later when Ten Boom was in her seventies, I do wonder if time put a gloss on memories such as the vitamin drop "miracle." Anne Frank's account of hiding in an Amsterdam annex from the Nazis came directly from her diaries written very close to events. Viktor E. Frankl's story of his experiences in four Concentration Camps including Auschwitz, Man's Search for Meaning, was written by him in nine days within months of his liberation. Elie Wiesel's story of his time in Auschwitz, Night was written in his twenties within a decade after his experiences there. The Hiding Place doesn't have the freshness and intensity of those accounts. Also, though it tells an extraordinary story, it's not always extraordinarily well-written when I compare it to the other books mentioned above. I read Frankl's account just before this book, and read Wiesel's book for the second time less than two months ago. Those are powerful accounts that deserve the name literature. This doesn't, which is why I haven't rated it nearly as highly as those other two books. But it's still a often gripping, at times moving book.more
Wonderful read! Corrie Ten Boom's story of the Holocaust is simultaneously frightening and somehow uplifting at the same time. Her humble, courageous faith is certainly something to be imitated.more
A truly awe-inspiring story of a Dutch Christian who helped protect Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. This book is especially notable because ten Boom is very rarely the hero in it. Yes, her bravery and compassion shine on nearly every page, but the constant focus on this story is on Christ. In this way, the book sets itself apart from many other like stories, but rather turns us, even in the darkest moments we can imagine, to the love and sovereignty of God, where we can rejoice even for fleas! (Which the characters ultimately have good reason to do!)I would wholeheartedly recommend to all Christians and to all people as a truly worthwhile and inspiring read.more
I was so privileged to meet Corrie ten Boom in person at the Billy Graham Association in Minneapolis during the 70's, and then privileged to work on the film production of the movie. She was an amazing, lovely, Godly woman, and her story will remain timeless.more
recommended as uplifting, which it was, despite being about the horrors of concentration camps.more
Amazing story of compassion, courage, and faith. Chronicles the story of the Ten Boom family in Haarlem, Netherlands, and their fearless and tireless work with the underground operation to provide safe haven for peoples considered unworthy of life by Nazi Germany. Even as their entire family is taken to prisons and concentration camps, where some of them perished, their faith and determination to do the right thing never wavered.more
I thought this was a wonderful book. I haven't read a book about the Holocaust in awhile and it's amazing to see it from the perspective of a Christian, since most I've read are by or about the Jewish victims who survived it.more
thanks to Fowles referencing this in his sermon, I had to reread this classic tale of a time in our history that should never be forgotten.The ending is in my top ten best book endings of all time.more
"The Hiding Place" by Corrie Ten Boom has to be one of the most moving, faith strengthening, profound books I have ever read!!! Corrie and the Ten Boom family decide to take a stand and hide and help their Jewish friends and neighbors in Nazi occupied Holland. The Ten Boom's build a hiding place within their home and assist in helping hundreds of others in finding safe shelter from the Nazi's, all the while putting them in constant peril. The true story that ensues describes horrors beyond belief. Even when faced with extreme adversity, the Ten Boom's push on insisting on relying upon their incredible faith in their savior, Jesus Christ. The Ten Boom's lived a life of faith that we all wish we had the guts to live! This book was incredible and life changing! Christian or not, this is a book that teaches us beyond just our faith that whatever we face, we must love one another regardless of the person or situation you are faced with, including the people who in the Ten Boom's case, where actually persecuting them!more
This is one of those wonderful biographies that you can fall in love with. It was my first real introduction to the horrors of the Holocaust, and the first time I read it, I turned around and read several more times. I was so in awe of the family, the story, the horrors they experienced and everything about it. It's definitely a moving story. Since I first read it over twenty years ago, I have returned every couple years to re-read it. My original copy became so worn, I had to buy another. The Hiding Place is basically divided into two sections--family history and resistance work with a subsection in concentration camps. The family history is incredibly charming. I feel like I know the characters! Each one stands out with his or her own unique personality. You can't help but love them. They are well described and developed as well as admirable. The family home is a quirky character in itself, which is important to their later work.The second half of the book is not so light and cheerful, but it is still inspiring and it is an important story to tell. This family put their own lives in danger to do the right thing--something that is all too rare in society. They shared everything they owned, and lost most of it, but I believe they gained from their experiences with the Jews they harbored.When their resistance work lands them in a concentration camp, Betsy and Corrie's story turns to a story of faith. Although terrible things happen to them, there are also many little miracles that seem much stronger than just coincidence. I am not an incredibly religious person, but the amazing bravery and faith of the ten Boom family awes me every time I read this book. It will always be one of my favorites.more
This is a profound book, and one that will not leave you unmoved. I even wrote a poem about it before I finished reading it:Victory Songby Melissa M.May 16, 2010Golden glimpses of the sun,Bits of clouds between the bars.Coughing blood, matted hair,Questions, memories, leaving scars.Making friends with tiny ants,Spilling crumbs to bring them out.Crossing days off on the wall,Wondering what this is all about.Planned by God, even this?Yes, and rejoicing still,Corrie ten Boom lying there,Knowing that this is God's will.Father died--no, was releasedTo Canaan's fairer land above.Jews in hiding did escape,This the outcome of God's love.Will we sing in trials now,Fight the sin and lonely days?Will we bravely others reach,And remember God's holy ways?Lord, we ask for strength and grace,Love for others true and strong,Love for You above all else,And to sing Your victory song!more
Oh, how powerful is grace, even in the darkest of times.more
This book lists Corrie Ten Boom as its author, but was published in 1971 and tells of Corrie's life before 1940 and then of the years she helped the Resistance in the Netherlands, till Aug 14, 1943, when she was arrested and spent time in prison and concentration camps till Jan 1, 1945. She was helped by the strong faith of her sister and herself, and thie book was published by a religious publsher in Grand Rapids, MIch. It has a lot of good pages, and I found it good reading, including the account of the years before the war.more
This is one of the most inspiring books that I have ever read. I love Corrie's and Betsie's view of the world, and their undending courage in Christ. I love how they see the blessings in the midst of trials, and are willing to share the gospel with others - no matter the cost.more
Corrie ten Boom and her family operated an underground movement in Holland during World War II, providing safe passage to Jews during the German occupation. Corrie's father owned a watch repair business; Corrie and her older sister Betsie remained unmarried and assisted their father in the shop. They were well-known for their kindness and hospitality, so it was natural for neighbors to turn to them for help. As they developed connections with others involved in the movement, their operation increased in scope and required both more sophisticated methods and more caution. A secret room was built in the house to hide the occupants in case of a raid. A buzzer system was installed to alert occupants to a raid or other emergency, and drills were held to ensure people could hide without leaving evidence. Signals were arranged to communicate when it was safe to enter the house. The ten Boom family performed an important ministry during the war, but eventually the authorities became aware of their work and the family was arrested and taken to a political prisoner camp. Corrie and Betsie ten Boom spent nearly a year in a series of prison camps, under appalling conditions. Their deep Christian faith was key to survival. After the war, Corrie set up rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands, lectured about her experience, and taught others based on the Christian Gospels and themes of forgiveness. Corrie ten Boom's faith and ability to forgive are an inspiration; it takes an extraordinary person to survive such a harrowing experience and be able to forgive your persecutors.The Hiding Place was an interesting memoir from a dark time in the history of humankind.more
I'm really glad my book club picked this one to read, because otherwise I probably would never have read something shelved in the Christian Inspiration section. Unlike some of the other books I've read in that genre, this one actually was inspiring. I didn't feel like I was being preached at or pressured to think or act a certain way. The story Corrie ten Boom tells about her captivity during World War II was truly moving and well-told.more
Reading this book, I had to ask myself, what is it that makes some people so much stronger than others? And I think that love is the answer. I just finished reading Man's Search for Meaning, and taken with that one, I found myself so impressed by the strength and faith of these people. I was just so inspired.I love to read Corrie Ten Boom. She makes me feel like I can do more, I can be better. Another thing I noticed about this book and about Viktor Frankl's is that neither one of them spent much time feeling sorry for themselves. They just went on with what had to be done.And even after Corrie returned home, having lost her sister and her father, she went ahead with her life, serving others who had lost just as much as she had, but still needed help.I could go on more about this book, but I'm not sure how to put into words what I felt. I know that I did feel that I can handle my challenges. She inspired me to become better myself.more
This book surprised me. I knew it was a great story--the tale of a Dutch woman whose family hid Jewish refugees in the early days of the Second World War, until they were caught and sent first to prison and later to a concentration camp. I had read the book years ago. What surprised me, when I picked the book off from my shelf to read for my daughter's schooling, was just how pleasant it was to read. The Sherrills and Ms. ten Boom have done a great job of presenting the sights and sounds, the people and events that makes up The Hiding Place. It's a suspenseful tale under-girded by a strong sense of faith and compassion.--J.more
Read all 48 reviews

Reviews

I read this book out loud to my husband and daughter on a road trip. I'd been trying to get my husband to read it for years. I re-read this book every year and have since I was 11. This book is remarkable. Even for people who are not religious. It will change your life and how you see the world. more
beautiful and transparent storymore
A must read for every one and any one who wishes to dive deeper and go all the way with God. Drinking of His love, accepting His forgiveness and coming under a sense of His grace, this was Corrie’s life!more
What makes this particular book different from other (better) stories about the Holocaust is that it's from the perspective of a Christian woman who was interned. While it's extremely important for us not to forget that one group of people was specifically targeted (Jews) it's also important for us to realize that this horrible thing went beyond that. This horrible thing didn't just affect "them"/"those other people" (oh isn't that sad?, what's for dinner?") but it affected the whole world. But non-Jews sometimes need more than an abstract reminder of how the Holocaust affected us all. Perhaps this first person narrative might bring it home.

It's not that well written but it's interesting and informative and I enjoyed it.more
As a fellow believer, I found her account of such love in the midst of such evil to be profoundly moving. I feel that she spared her readers some (but certainly not all!) of the grittier details, but that was OK; I was able to extrapolate, younger readers would be spared some of the horror.more
While I was expecting to be moved by this book, as I have been with every holocaust memoir I've read, I wasn't expecting to be as deeply moved as I was. The faith of the ten Boom family, and the way it informs their decisions to do the right thing, regardless of personal risk, is humbling. This is not to say Ms. ten Boom does not have moments of despair -- how could she not given what happened to her, to her family and to her neighbors and those she helped? It is the moments of despair which allow reader to identify with the her and her sister and father.A remarkable book about the light that remains alight even in the darkest of nights.more
This is the true story of Corrie and her family during WWII. The terrible things that they went through make our troubles seem as nothing. She tells of her faith and trust in God and how it grew to the point of forgiveness and caring and compassion for those who had so mistreated her and so many others. It gave me a real example of the extreme battle of good and evil that we face in this world and how through Christ we are more than conquerors. LKCmore
This is my second favorite of all time. Thank you to my old carpooler, Victoria for sharing! Such an amazing story of survival, grace, mercy, forgiveness, and love. This story will stay with me for life and has changed me in many wonderful ways. I try to always look at the positive side to everything thanks to Ms. ten Boom and her sister. Warning-the first 1/2 of the book can drag a bit, but the second 1/2 flys by and hits you right between the eyes!more
The Hiding Place tells the story of the TenBoom family who were Dutch Christians in Holland during the Second world War and how they committed their lives to protecting God's people- the Jews- from the Nazis. "Me and my family would concider it an honour to die for the Jews" Said Papa TenBoom, and die he would.more
This is the story of Corrie ten Boom, a self-described "spinster" watchmaker who lived with her father and sister and was pushing fifty when she became part of the Dutch Resistance helping to hide Jews from the Nazis. Eventually betrayed, she wound up in a Gestapo prison for a few months, then doing forced labor in the Vught Concentration Camp, which harsh as it was, was paradisaical compared to where she next wound up until released, the notorious Ravensbruck Concentration Camp. This is her first person account, written decades after the fact with the help of John and Elizabeth Sherrill. It got off to what I found a slow start in the first four chapters which tells of the life of her and her family before World War II. I thought it picked up in pace a great deal in the later chapters once it began to tell of her involvement aiding Jews in the Underground, and from that moment I was completely engrossed--and indeed the story, particularly before they were betrayed to the Nazis, sometimes surprised me with its warmth and humor. Her father, for instance, never really understood why all the Resistance people were calling themselves "Smit" and kept asking whether they were related to this or that Smit family he knew.I picked up the book because it was recommended on the Ultimate Reading List in the "Inspirational Non-fiction" section. For "inspirational" read "religious" and almost always "Christian" and I indeed found it in the "Christian Inspiration" section. Some reviews complained about the religiosity, but it really didn't bother me--and I'm an atheist with little patience when I feel I'm being preached at. Perhaps it's just that I took this in stride as part and parcel of Miss Ten Boom. That faith was just as much as the foundation of her thinking and deeds as Hinduism was for Ghandi or Buddhism for the Dalai Llama. There's nothing smug or self-righteous in her tone. Nor did she come across as "goodie two shoes" to me--she sometimes understandably struggled with anger and fear. She's human--although in my book still a hero. I even saw one review that called her a "bigot." That couldn't be further from the truth. The Ten Booms saved many Jews, hiding them in their own home at great risk to themselves, tried to serve them kosher food when they could, celebrated the Sabbath with them and Jewish holidays. I saw no sign of bigotry towards those of other beliefs. Having a strong faith that a person takes seriously in deciding how to act does not make one a bigot. Anyone who mistakes that for bigotry has their own issues with anti-Christian bigotry in my opinion.On the other hand, I do agree with one reviewer that I suspect that her Christian faith did "sugar coat" things more than a little and probably colored her recollection. I don't think Ten Boom ever consciously shaded the truth, but especially given this was recounted almost thirty years later when Ten Boom was in her seventies, I do wonder if time put a gloss on memories such as the vitamin drop "miracle." Anne Frank's account of hiding in an Amsterdam annex from the Nazis came directly from her diaries written very close to events. Viktor E. Frankl's story of his experiences in four Concentration Camps including Auschwitz, Man's Search for Meaning, was written by him in nine days within months of his liberation. Elie Wiesel's story of his time in Auschwitz, Night was written in his twenties within a decade after his experiences there. The Hiding Place doesn't have the freshness and intensity of those accounts. Also, though it tells an extraordinary story, it's not always extraordinarily well-written when I compare it to the other books mentioned above. I read Frankl's account just before this book, and read Wiesel's book for the second time less than two months ago. Those are powerful accounts that deserve the name literature. This doesn't, which is why I haven't rated it nearly as highly as those other two books. But it's still a often gripping, at times moving book.more
Wonderful read! Corrie Ten Boom's story of the Holocaust is simultaneously frightening and somehow uplifting at the same time. Her humble, courageous faith is certainly something to be imitated.more
A truly awe-inspiring story of a Dutch Christian who helped protect Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. This book is especially notable because ten Boom is very rarely the hero in it. Yes, her bravery and compassion shine on nearly every page, but the constant focus on this story is on Christ. In this way, the book sets itself apart from many other like stories, but rather turns us, even in the darkest moments we can imagine, to the love and sovereignty of God, where we can rejoice even for fleas! (Which the characters ultimately have good reason to do!)I would wholeheartedly recommend to all Christians and to all people as a truly worthwhile and inspiring read.more
I was so privileged to meet Corrie ten Boom in person at the Billy Graham Association in Minneapolis during the 70's, and then privileged to work on the film production of the movie. She was an amazing, lovely, Godly woman, and her story will remain timeless.more
recommended as uplifting, which it was, despite being about the horrors of concentration camps.more
Amazing story of compassion, courage, and faith. Chronicles the story of the Ten Boom family in Haarlem, Netherlands, and their fearless and tireless work with the underground operation to provide safe haven for peoples considered unworthy of life by Nazi Germany. Even as their entire family is taken to prisons and concentration camps, where some of them perished, their faith and determination to do the right thing never wavered.more
I thought this was a wonderful book. I haven't read a book about the Holocaust in awhile and it's amazing to see it from the perspective of a Christian, since most I've read are by or about the Jewish victims who survived it.more
thanks to Fowles referencing this in his sermon, I had to reread this classic tale of a time in our history that should never be forgotten.The ending is in my top ten best book endings of all time.more
"The Hiding Place" by Corrie Ten Boom has to be one of the most moving, faith strengthening, profound books I have ever read!!! Corrie and the Ten Boom family decide to take a stand and hide and help their Jewish friends and neighbors in Nazi occupied Holland. The Ten Boom's build a hiding place within their home and assist in helping hundreds of others in finding safe shelter from the Nazi's, all the while putting them in constant peril. The true story that ensues describes horrors beyond belief. Even when faced with extreme adversity, the Ten Boom's push on insisting on relying upon their incredible faith in their savior, Jesus Christ. The Ten Boom's lived a life of faith that we all wish we had the guts to live! This book was incredible and life changing! Christian or not, this is a book that teaches us beyond just our faith that whatever we face, we must love one another regardless of the person or situation you are faced with, including the people who in the Ten Boom's case, where actually persecuting them!more
This is one of those wonderful biographies that you can fall in love with. It was my first real introduction to the horrors of the Holocaust, and the first time I read it, I turned around and read several more times. I was so in awe of the family, the story, the horrors they experienced and everything about it. It's definitely a moving story. Since I first read it over twenty years ago, I have returned every couple years to re-read it. My original copy became so worn, I had to buy another. The Hiding Place is basically divided into two sections--family history and resistance work with a subsection in concentration camps. The family history is incredibly charming. I feel like I know the characters! Each one stands out with his or her own unique personality. You can't help but love them. They are well described and developed as well as admirable. The family home is a quirky character in itself, which is important to their later work.The second half of the book is not so light and cheerful, but it is still inspiring and it is an important story to tell. This family put their own lives in danger to do the right thing--something that is all too rare in society. They shared everything they owned, and lost most of it, but I believe they gained from their experiences with the Jews they harbored.When their resistance work lands them in a concentration camp, Betsy and Corrie's story turns to a story of faith. Although terrible things happen to them, there are also many little miracles that seem much stronger than just coincidence. I am not an incredibly religious person, but the amazing bravery and faith of the ten Boom family awes me every time I read this book. It will always be one of my favorites.more
This is a profound book, and one that will not leave you unmoved. I even wrote a poem about it before I finished reading it:Victory Songby Melissa M.May 16, 2010Golden glimpses of the sun,Bits of clouds between the bars.Coughing blood, matted hair,Questions, memories, leaving scars.Making friends with tiny ants,Spilling crumbs to bring them out.Crossing days off on the wall,Wondering what this is all about.Planned by God, even this?Yes, and rejoicing still,Corrie ten Boom lying there,Knowing that this is God's will.Father died--no, was releasedTo Canaan's fairer land above.Jews in hiding did escape,This the outcome of God's love.Will we sing in trials now,Fight the sin and lonely days?Will we bravely others reach,And remember God's holy ways?Lord, we ask for strength and grace,Love for others true and strong,Love for You above all else,And to sing Your victory song!more
Oh, how powerful is grace, even in the darkest of times.more
This book lists Corrie Ten Boom as its author, but was published in 1971 and tells of Corrie's life before 1940 and then of the years she helped the Resistance in the Netherlands, till Aug 14, 1943, when she was arrested and spent time in prison and concentration camps till Jan 1, 1945. She was helped by the strong faith of her sister and herself, and thie book was published by a religious publsher in Grand Rapids, MIch. It has a lot of good pages, and I found it good reading, including the account of the years before the war.more
This is one of the most inspiring books that I have ever read. I love Corrie's and Betsie's view of the world, and their undending courage in Christ. I love how they see the blessings in the midst of trials, and are willing to share the gospel with others - no matter the cost.more
Corrie ten Boom and her family operated an underground movement in Holland during World War II, providing safe passage to Jews during the German occupation. Corrie's father owned a watch repair business; Corrie and her older sister Betsie remained unmarried and assisted their father in the shop. They were well-known for their kindness and hospitality, so it was natural for neighbors to turn to them for help. As they developed connections with others involved in the movement, their operation increased in scope and required both more sophisticated methods and more caution. A secret room was built in the house to hide the occupants in case of a raid. A buzzer system was installed to alert occupants to a raid or other emergency, and drills were held to ensure people could hide without leaving evidence. Signals were arranged to communicate when it was safe to enter the house. The ten Boom family performed an important ministry during the war, but eventually the authorities became aware of their work and the family was arrested and taken to a political prisoner camp. Corrie and Betsie ten Boom spent nearly a year in a series of prison camps, under appalling conditions. Their deep Christian faith was key to survival. After the war, Corrie set up rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands, lectured about her experience, and taught others based on the Christian Gospels and themes of forgiveness. Corrie ten Boom's faith and ability to forgive are an inspiration; it takes an extraordinary person to survive such a harrowing experience and be able to forgive your persecutors.The Hiding Place was an interesting memoir from a dark time in the history of humankind.more
I'm really glad my book club picked this one to read, because otherwise I probably would never have read something shelved in the Christian Inspiration section. Unlike some of the other books I've read in that genre, this one actually was inspiring. I didn't feel like I was being preached at or pressured to think or act a certain way. The story Corrie ten Boom tells about her captivity during World War II was truly moving and well-told.more
Reading this book, I had to ask myself, what is it that makes some people so much stronger than others? And I think that love is the answer. I just finished reading Man's Search for Meaning, and taken with that one, I found myself so impressed by the strength and faith of these people. I was just so inspired.I love to read Corrie Ten Boom. She makes me feel like I can do more, I can be better. Another thing I noticed about this book and about Viktor Frankl's is that neither one of them spent much time feeling sorry for themselves. They just went on with what had to be done.And even after Corrie returned home, having lost her sister and her father, she went ahead with her life, serving others who had lost just as much as she had, but still needed help.I could go on more about this book, but I'm not sure how to put into words what I felt. I know that I did feel that I can handle my challenges. She inspired me to become better myself.more
This book surprised me. I knew it was a great story--the tale of a Dutch woman whose family hid Jewish refugees in the early days of the Second World War, until they were caught and sent first to prison and later to a concentration camp. I had read the book years ago. What surprised me, when I picked the book off from my shelf to read for my daughter's schooling, was just how pleasant it was to read. The Sherrills and Ms. ten Boom have done a great job of presenting the sights and sounds, the people and events that makes up The Hiding Place. It's a suspenseful tale under-girded by a strong sense of faith and compassion.--J.more
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