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Son of Hamas is now available in softcover with an all-new chapter about events since the book’s release such as the revelation of Mosab’s Israeli intelligence handler’s true identity, and Homeland Security’s effort to deport the author.
Since he was a small boy, Mosab Hassan Yousef has had an inside view of the deadly terrorist group Hamas. The oldest son of Sheikh Hassan Yousef, a founding member of Hamas and its most popular leader, young Mosab assisted his father for years in his political activities while being groomed to assume his legacy, politics, status . . . and power. But everything changed when Mosab turned away from terror and violence, and embraced instead the teachings of another famous Middle East leader. In Son of Hamas, Mosab reveals new information about the world’s most dangerous terrorist organization and unveils the truth about his own role, his agonizing separation from family and homeland, the dangerous decision to make his newfound faith public, and his belief that the Christian mandate to “love your enemies” is the only way to peace in the Middle East.
Published: Tyndale House Publishers on Feb 24, 2011
ISBN: 9781414364018
List price: $15.99
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the book was very informativeread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I haven't read much so far, and I am duly and genuinely shocked, just as I am supposed to be, about the terrible things the Israelis did on a daily basis to the occupants of the Gaza strip. I am not terribly impressed with the glossing-over of the 'guaranteed-non-violent, peaceful, moderate' stance of Hamas during this time. When I read, continually and in detail, that the Israelis often shot innocent Palestinians for just being Palestinians but that a Palestinian just went and shot a couple of Israelis and took their guns and then that became a way for them to get arms all in one sentence I begin to suspect that this book, by a Christian convert, is more the wolf wearing the Lamb of Peace's clothing.

A sentence like, "Then Israel decided to secretly deport 415 leaders...". It wasn't very secret then, was it? And, following on from this, "The men were driven to a snow-covered no-man's-land in Southern Lebanon. Although we were in the middle of a bitter winter, they were dumped there with no shelter or provisions. Neither Israel nor Lebanon would allow relief agencies to deliver food or medicine. Beirut refused to transport the sick and injured to its hospitals."

Then, in the next paragraph, "A couple of weeks later, we finally saw him [his father:] on television for the first time since his deportation. Apparently Hamas members had named him secretary-general of the camp, second only to..." Eventually the father gets a cell phone and communications are normalised.

Doesn't sound a bit like they were dumped in the middle of nowhere without food or shelter.

I hope the book improves, its naively written by the obvious ghost writer and it seems to be all about total emotional manipulation of the all-too-willing to believe the author's intended, pro-Palestinian audience. I want the facts not this soft, biased pap.

There is more to the war between the Palestinians, the Arabs and Israel than meets the eye but its never discussed. Israel is the West's secure base in the Middle East, it is democracy's secure base. It is a total sore for the Arabs who do not practice any kind of democracy, kings, dictators, and the military rule their countries. They do not want women walking the streets in tiny shorts and halter tops and having relationships of their own choosing. They do not even allow women to be educated and live a self-determined life. They do not allow unmarried women to get contraception and screw whomsoever they please after a hot night at the club. They don't have those sort of clubs for local women either.

How many Arab countries do you hear of where a woman (or a man) has risen from a poor background to a high position? It happens in our societies all the time. Everything about Israel, which is a country very similar to the US, the UK, France etc, threatens the Arabs. It doesn't stop me supporting the idea of a Palestinian State, in fact I want one even more because of it. But they see Israel ass the hole of the Western decadence we call freedom in the doughnut of Arab and Muslim repression and any kind of land exchange isn't going to make the slightest difference to their collective enmity to that.

I had hoped this book would present a true picture of Hamas from the inside and see that they are just sweet, people trying to live in moderate Islamic way who are terribly persecuted and whom we should all support. Yeah well, I got suckered into paying for this piece of crap but I'm not wasting my time reading any more of it. Deep shite for the PC-people to sigh and tut-tut over, more grist for the anti-Israelis/Zionists/Jews, another biased BBC documentary, and still... still no representation for the Palestinians who would like peace, would be happy to see their daughters educated and for all of them to live in the 21st century.

(Do such people exist? Yes, I used to share an apartment in London with some, I worked for a couple in Jerusalem, there are a few on the island, but no one hears their voices and they aren't loud people by nature, and neither would I be if I were them).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A bit too much Christian propagandaread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I thought that this book would be better than it actually was. The narrative just didn't flow well (probably because the author's native language isn't English), so it felt like I was slogging through the chapters instead of actually enjoying the book. The author did have some interesting insights into the Palestine-Israel conflict, especially considering that he is the son of one of Hamas' founders.I really became disinterested in the tale when the author converted to Christianity, however. It's all fine and good that he did, but he doesn't seem to have much knowledge about his new faith. He keeps telling the readers how bloody and angry Allah is, but if he's read the bible in its entirety, surely he'd realize that the Christian god is very similar. And when he talked about how some Christian tore apart the Qu'ran by exposing how it contradicted itself and science, I had to laugh. The bible doesn't fare any better to such scrutiny.I was hoping that, as an atheist, I'd still be able to get something from this book instead of being preached to, but in the end, I really didn't.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Fascinating account of the history leading up to the recent developments in the middle east (Israel and Palestinian conflict). Book on CD version was excellent.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was one of the best biographies I have read in a long time. First, it helped me understand the massive complexities in the Middle East. Understanding the history and motivations of groups like Hamas, the PLO, and the PA make the news more understandable, and reveal a very gray situation with good and bad on both sides of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.But the book is about more than politics. It is also about a boy who becomes a man, caught up in events bigger than himself, all the while unsure of his conflicted feelings about his father, Hamas, and the people he is supposed to hate. All of this is compounded by his exposure to the teaching of Jesus which also begin to transform his thinking and character, while he is simultaneously serving as a leader to his people and a spy to Israel Shin Bet, trying to save lives on both sides. Overall, a gripping tale that is more interesting than most works of fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Amazing story of the son of one of the founders of Hamas coming to faith in Jesus. Stunning.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I do not know how to rate this book. The story is gripping and the author paints what I suspect is a true picture of the complex ties between different factions among the Israelis and the Palestinians, as well as their supporters in Arab nations and in the U.S. The violence and waste of humanity is clearly set out. The IDF does one thing, the Shin Bet another. The CIA does one thing, the PLO does another, Hamas does another. Such a waste of money, effort and humanity. Yousef's story of working for Shin Bet is so amazing that it is difficult to believe, but I know of no evidence to discredit it. His conversion to Christianity is not well-described, but appears to be genuine. Alas, I fear cloaking oneself in another religion will not help. His perspective on Islam seems to be similar to that of Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Being Jewish, I know very little about Islam, but I know many muslims would disagree with his perspective, which is entirely the Hamas perspective. I have always felt that every religion has been used as a weapon at one time or another. The level of damage is simply proportional to the amount of power that religion happens to have at that time. But back to the subject: I really, really enjoyed reading this book. Yes, the historical details may not be quite accurate, as some have pointed out, but other details about current events in the occupied territories are better explained. Overall, I guess I hope this book is true and that the author finds peace in his life. As for the Israelis and Palestinians, peace must come someday, but no one can predict when that will happen.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If I think I have mixed feelings about the book, I should not forget the obviously mixed feelings that the author has about the life that he found himself born into. It's worth a read because it presents a perspective about the Middle East that we never hear. And yes, there is controversy surrounding this author.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a true and remarkable story about one the author being born into the Islamic Hamas Palestinian group and following his Father through its highest ranks. However, he soon becomes an Israeli informant when he can no longer justify and sit by and watch the cruelty and death caused by Hamas, all in the conflicted (and often misinterpreted) name of Islam. Yousef is unbelievably brave to have taken the chances he did but in doing so, he saved countless lives. He also lead a very, very lonely life to do so. This is by no means a well written memoir, it suffers there, but the story is very well worth reading. This is the first source ever that actually made me understand, at its core, what the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is about and why efforts at peace continue to fail. I learned a LOT. This is a quick read that often feels like fiction due to how remarkable the author's life was. My only other complaint is that it is kind of a "Bible thumper" regarding the authors conversion to Christianity and that got a bit tiresome. While it may have been the author's salvation, it seems patently unrealistic that it will be the solution to the problems in the Middle East (what he seems to suggest). But he lost his family and everything he knew to stand for peace and loving people not like ourselves (not a spoiler, he leads in with that); and that is just amazing. He is a quiet hero in a big, ongoing war/conflict.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

ngjga.m.
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Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

the book was very informative
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I haven't read much so far, and I am duly and genuinely shocked, just as I am supposed to be, about the terrible things the Israelis did on a daily basis to the occupants of the Gaza strip. I am not terribly impressed with the glossing-over of the 'guaranteed-non-violent, peaceful, moderate' stance of Hamas during this time. When I read, continually and in detail, that the Israelis often shot innocent Palestinians for just being Palestinians but that a Palestinian just went and shot a couple of Israelis and took their guns and then that became a way for them to get arms all in one sentence I begin to suspect that this book, by a Christian convert, is more the wolf wearing the Lamb of Peace's clothing.

A sentence like, "Then Israel decided to secretly deport 415 leaders...". It wasn't very secret then, was it? And, following on from this, "The men were driven to a snow-covered no-man's-land in Southern Lebanon. Although we were in the middle of a bitter winter, they were dumped there with no shelter or provisions. Neither Israel nor Lebanon would allow relief agencies to deliver food or medicine. Beirut refused to transport the sick and injured to its hospitals."

Then, in the next paragraph, "A couple of weeks later, we finally saw him [his father:] on television for the first time since his deportation. Apparently Hamas members had named him secretary-general of the camp, second only to..." Eventually the father gets a cell phone and communications are normalised.

Doesn't sound a bit like they were dumped in the middle of nowhere without food or shelter.

I hope the book improves, its naively written by the obvious ghost writer and it seems to be all about total emotional manipulation of the all-too-willing to believe the author's intended, pro-Palestinian audience. I want the facts not this soft, biased pap.

There is more to the war between the Palestinians, the Arabs and Israel than meets the eye but its never discussed. Israel is the West's secure base in the Middle East, it is democracy's secure base. It is a total sore for the Arabs who do not practice any kind of democracy, kings, dictators, and the military rule their countries. They do not want women walking the streets in tiny shorts and halter tops and having relationships of their own choosing. They do not even allow women to be educated and live a self-determined life. They do not allow unmarried women to get contraception and screw whomsoever they please after a hot night at the club. They don't have those sort of clubs for local women either.

How many Arab countries do you hear of where a woman (or a man) has risen from a poor background to a high position? It happens in our societies all the time. Everything about Israel, which is a country very similar to the US, the UK, France etc, threatens the Arabs. It doesn't stop me supporting the idea of a Palestinian State, in fact I want one even more because of it. But they see Israel ass the hole of the Western decadence we call freedom in the doughnut of Arab and Muslim repression and any kind of land exchange isn't going to make the slightest difference to their collective enmity to that.

I had hoped this book would present a true picture of Hamas from the inside and see that they are just sweet, people trying to live in moderate Islamic way who are terribly persecuted and whom we should all support. Yeah well, I got suckered into paying for this piece of crap but I'm not wasting my time reading any more of it. Deep shite for the PC-people to sigh and tut-tut over, more grist for the anti-Israelis/Zionists/Jews, another biased BBC documentary, and still... still no representation for the Palestinians who would like peace, would be happy to see their daughters educated and for all of them to live in the 21st century.

(Do such people exist? Yes, I used to share an apartment in London with some, I worked for a couple in Jerusalem, there are a few on the island, but no one hears their voices and they aren't loud people by nature, and neither would I be if I were them).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A bit too much Christian propaganda
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I thought that this book would be better than it actually was. The narrative just didn't flow well (probably because the author's native language isn't English), so it felt like I was slogging through the chapters instead of actually enjoying the book. The author did have some interesting insights into the Palestine-Israel conflict, especially considering that he is the son of one of Hamas' founders.I really became disinterested in the tale when the author converted to Christianity, however. It's all fine and good that he did, but he doesn't seem to have much knowledge about his new faith. He keeps telling the readers how bloody and angry Allah is, but if he's read the bible in its entirety, surely he'd realize that the Christian god is very similar. And when he talked about how some Christian tore apart the Qu'ran by exposing how it contradicted itself and science, I had to laugh. The bible doesn't fare any better to such scrutiny.I was hoping that, as an atheist, I'd still be able to get something from this book instead of being preached to, but in the end, I really didn't.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Fascinating account of the history leading up to the recent developments in the middle east (Israel and Palestinian conflict). Book on CD version was excellent.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was one of the best biographies I have read in a long time. First, it helped me understand the massive complexities in the Middle East. Understanding the history and motivations of groups like Hamas, the PLO, and the PA make the news more understandable, and reveal a very gray situation with good and bad on both sides of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.But the book is about more than politics. It is also about a boy who becomes a man, caught up in events bigger than himself, all the while unsure of his conflicted feelings about his father, Hamas, and the people he is supposed to hate. All of this is compounded by his exposure to the teaching of Jesus which also begin to transform his thinking and character, while he is simultaneously serving as a leader to his people and a spy to Israel Shin Bet, trying to save lives on both sides. Overall, a gripping tale that is more interesting than most works of fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Amazing story of the son of one of the founders of Hamas coming to faith in Jesus. Stunning.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I do not know how to rate this book. The story is gripping and the author paints what I suspect is a true picture of the complex ties between different factions among the Israelis and the Palestinians, as well as their supporters in Arab nations and in the U.S. The violence and waste of humanity is clearly set out. The IDF does one thing, the Shin Bet another. The CIA does one thing, the PLO does another, Hamas does another. Such a waste of money, effort and humanity. Yousef's story of working for Shin Bet is so amazing that it is difficult to believe, but I know of no evidence to discredit it. His conversion to Christianity is not well-described, but appears to be genuine. Alas, I fear cloaking oneself in another religion will not help. His perspective on Islam seems to be similar to that of Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Being Jewish, I know very little about Islam, but I know many muslims would disagree with his perspective, which is entirely the Hamas perspective. I have always felt that every religion has been used as a weapon at one time or another. The level of damage is simply proportional to the amount of power that religion happens to have at that time. But back to the subject: I really, really enjoyed reading this book. Yes, the historical details may not be quite accurate, as some have pointed out, but other details about current events in the occupied territories are better explained. Overall, I guess I hope this book is true and that the author finds peace in his life. As for the Israelis and Palestinians, peace must come someday, but no one can predict when that will happen.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If I think I have mixed feelings about the book, I should not forget the obviously mixed feelings that the author has about the life that he found himself born into. It's worth a read because it presents a perspective about the Middle East that we never hear. And yes, there is controversy surrounding this author.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a true and remarkable story about one the author being born into the Islamic Hamas Palestinian group and following his Father through its highest ranks. However, he soon becomes an Israeli informant when he can no longer justify and sit by and watch the cruelty and death caused by Hamas, all in the conflicted (and often misinterpreted) name of Islam. Yousef is unbelievably brave to have taken the chances he did but in doing so, he saved countless lives. He also lead a very, very lonely life to do so. This is by no means a well written memoir, it suffers there, but the story is very well worth reading. This is the first source ever that actually made me understand, at its core, what the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is about and why efforts at peace continue to fail. I learned a LOT. This is a quick read that often feels like fiction due to how remarkable the author's life was. My only other complaint is that it is kind of a "Bible thumper" regarding the authors conversion to Christianity and that got a bit tiresome. While it may have been the author's salvation, it seems patently unrealistic that it will be the solution to the problems in the Middle East (what he seems to suggest). But he lost his family and everything he knew to stand for peace and loving people not like ourselves (not a spoiler, he leads in with that); and that is just amazing. He is a quiet hero in a big, ongoing war/conflict.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

ngjga.m.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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