Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Expecting to treat some mildly ill children from the streets of Bolivia on a quick “service trip,” an idealistic young medical student gets more than he bargained for when he takes a year off from Harvard Medical School to work at an orphanage in La Paz. As he comes to know the children, and sees how they live, Chi Huang is drawn deeper and deeper into their complex and desperate lives. The doctor soon realizes that to truly help these children, he will have to follow the example of Jesus: live among them, love them in spite of their brokenness, and cling to his faith in God's goodness, even when it appears it is nowhere to be found. A true story that will inspire and challenge readers to greater faith and action. The book includes a Foreword by Harvard professor and world-renowned expert on the moral and spiritual development of children, Dr. Robert Coles.
Published: Tyndale House Publishers on
ISBN: 9781414329659
List price: $14.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for When Invisible Children Sing
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Chi Cheng Huang certainly knows how to write. When he describes the street children he tried to help in Bolivia, it feels like you're right there alongside him. The problems the street kids are facing are uncomfortably similar to the problems American foster children have. Dr. Huang wanted to save everyone he met and he learned, time and time again, that it doesn't work like that. But you can save a few people, one at a time.Other points of interest: He does describe his childhood and his sister's death and how it affected him, and this adds to the narrative and doesn't distract the reader from the main story. Also, Dr. Huang is a very religious Christian, but he doesn't spend too much time on that either. And the book was written in part to raise funds for his non-profit to help Bolivian street children, but I didn't even find out about that until the very end.In all, WIN.more

Reviews

Chi Cheng Huang certainly knows how to write. When he describes the street children he tried to help in Bolivia, it feels like you're right there alongside him. The problems the street kids are facing are uncomfortably similar to the problems American foster children have. Dr. Huang wanted to save everyone he met and he learned, time and time again, that it doesn't work like that. But you can save a few people, one at a time.Other points of interest: He does describe his childhood and his sister's death and how it affected him, and this adds to the narrative and doesn't distract the reader from the main story. Also, Dr. Huang is a very religious Christian, but he doesn't spend too much time on that either. And the book was written in part to raise funds for his non-profit to help Bolivian street children, but I didn't even find out about that until the very end.In all, WIN.more
scribd