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Perhaps the inspiration for the show the Amazing Race, Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne is the story of the eccentric Englishman Phileas Fogg and his trusty French valet Passepartout, who, on a bet of 20K pounds, attempt to travel the globe on trains, steamboats and a hot air balloon. Fogg blows most of his fortune in the attempt, but his adventure sets him in England, Paris, the Suez Canal, Egypt, India, Hong Kong, Japan, America, and Ireland.

Every good adventure story needs a villain, thus we have the nosy detective Mr. Fix, who's on their trail, suspecting that Fogg is a bankrobber who's stolen 55K pounds. While in India they pick up the beautiful princess Aouda whom they rescue and take along for the ride. Will Fogg make it back to England in time to win the bet, or will detective Fix catch Fogg as he races around the globe?

Published: Sheba Blake Publishing an imprint of Vearsa Limited on
ISBN: 9781312357051
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A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).more
Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!more
As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.more
I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.more
So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.more
Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
This is a fun book filled with out-dated stereotypes, unlikely luck and a kick-ass ending. It should be required reading for travel students everywhere ;)more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
For my Independent Reading Book Project, I read "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne. The novel is about an English man named Phileas Fogg, his servant, Jean Passepartout, and their journey in hopes of circumnavigating the world in a mere eighty days. His motivation? Winning a bet of twenty-thousand pounds. Well, that and bragging rights. Immediately after the bet was made, Mr. Fogg and Passepartout depart the continent. In this very suspenseful plot line, the travelers jump from steamer to railway, all the while being trailed by a sneaky detective. With several twists and turns woven into the book, you are on edge from cover to cover. Moreover, in the back of your mind you are always thinking: Will they finish the journey in time?I appreciated how geographically educational this book was (although some chapters were a bit ‘school-syllabus’ type). In addition, there was always something arising—never a dull moment in this fast-paced book. Even though the character development was lacking, Verne wrote it in such a way that you felt as if you were tagging alongside the main characters, experiencing the great enterprise with them. Overall, this great read is a classic adventure story that has stood the test of time. If you want to have a laugh while reading a well-written book, "Around the World in Eighty Days" is for you!more
“Around the World in 80 days” by Jules Verne is about the adventures of Mr. Fogg’s and his hired, French, hand Passepartout. After making a bet that he, Mr. Fogg, could make it around the world in 80 days he and Passepartout set out to win. I believe that Jules Verne wrote this book to show how anything is possible and even if something might seem ridiculous at first, things can turn out to be quite an adventure.In the book, Mr. Fogg is often ridiculed and questioned. He still keeps going and ends up saving and meeting Auoda, who he will later marry. Mr. Fogg brings joy because of his easiness and his courage to keep going, even though there were many challenges in his way. With his courage he is able to travel around the world in 80 days and do the unthinkable in that time.Another example would be at this part in the book were Mr. Fogg and Passepartout are charged with thievery. While Passepartout is freaking out, Mr. Fogg stays relax and bails them out. Staying calm and relaxed keeps them on their way and adds a new adventure to their trip. Through this all you’re just hoping that they will keep their heads and keep on their way so that they can arrive on time. The last example would be how at the beginning this bet and trip around the world in 80 days seemed ridiculous but later it brought them this new knowledge of the world and plenty new adventures. On just his belief and faith that they could make it around the world in 80 days made the whole trip possible because it brought fierceness into reaching their goal. In conclusion, this book brings a new idea of sticking to an idea and following it through because in the end you will gain new stories and memories. That is exactly what happens to Mr. Fogg and Passepartout, they stuck to this insane idea and in the end got a garden full of memories.more
In Around the World in 80 Days, Jules Verne's main character, Phileas Fogg, is presented with a challenge. To journey around the world, all in 80 days. Phileas' attitude towards the journey is naive, but his servant, Passepartout, is worrisome about the journey, and the various gains and losses of time on their schedule.The book takes you on a journey, around the world in 80 days, with the characters. I think that this book provides a great reading environment, as well as an overall experience. Many people have had the same as I have, therefore making this book a classic.more
Review of Around the World in Eighty DaysThe book, Around the World in Eighty Days, by Jules Verne is a book about a man named Phileas Fogg who claims that it is possible to travel around the world in eighty days. He then gets challenged to do this himself. This book gets more exciting and dramatic every time you turn the page.One of the main reasons this book keeps you on the edge of your seat is that you don't know if Phileas will be able to make the deadline and win the bet of traveling around the world in eighty days. Also, throughout the course of the book Phileas turns from a cold calculative man, to a more outgoing energetic man. “I say, you do have a heart!' “Sometimes,” he replied, 'When I have the time.” This quote shows that the character is still his old self partly, but he has also transformed into a warmer person. Like many adventures, money is something that drives this story, “A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager.” That wager is something that enhances the story and makes it more exciting.Jules Verne has produced a number of adventure novels, but none quite like this one. This book shows just how mad adventure can be. If you love adventure novels, you should definitely check this book out. Jules Verne makes adventure come to life in Around the World in Eighty Days.more
Substance: A travelogue and catalogue of "modern" transportation inventions, yet the story is engaging as well, despite its absurd contrivances. Verne has a droll humour.Note: The annotations are occasionally helpful, but so is a good dictionary. For some reason, many very obvious archaisms and forgotten "current news items" are not explained.more
I'm not sure which translation I read (it was the free English one on the Gutenberg Project) but I wasn't really engaged by this. I didn't like the characters, save for Passepartout, and the trip didn't have the suspense or creativity I've come to expect from Verne.more
A version of Around the World in 80 Days done as a French language textbook reader with English introduction and notes. Useful for someone like me who loves the story and has only moderate skill in Frenchmore
A classic, with good reason. There was a certain amount of 'Deus ex machina', but it didn't detract from the enjoyment of the book. I found it interesting how Verne subtly brought up Phileas Fogg's despondency, at the end - it was a while before I clued in as to what Fogg was actually planning to do.While the story was delightful, I have a couple of quibbles with this particular edition:1. It doesn't say who the translator was; and2. I found at least 3 typos in the book. Proofreading!I chose this edition because it had interesting cover art and wasn't full of "book club" questions and endless commentary like most of the others - but the typos were disappointing, and omission of the translator's name baffling to say the least. Those things aside, the story was thoroughly enjoyable, and before I'd finished I was already wanting to read it again. Highly recommended - but try a different edition.more
Fantastic, so much fun. Can't believe it took this long for me to read this!more
 What a delightful book. It bears the tone of an unflappable gentleman of the world, and the travel tour across the globe, particularly Asia, is highly memorable. There is time enough to do good deeds as well, as when a young woman is rescued from the fate of suttee in India.more
This is the ultimate travel tale. It's full of adventure and suspense spiced with humor and romance. It's lighthearted fun, yet it touches on social issues of its era such as the status and treatment of women in India and opium use in China.It's interesting that, while there are lots of characters in the book, there is only one female. Her character is less developed than the male characters, and she has a mostly passive role in the action. I don't read many adventure novels, and I haven't read any of Verne's other books, so perhaps this is typical of the genre.This story lends itself well to reading aloud or listening to on audio. I listened to an audio version on a road trip and it made the time pass quickly.more
if i had read the original french, it probably would have been assigned five stars. Scholastic edition didn't even mention the translator! So the defects I have noticed may have come through the translation; i.e., there are no "wharves" in Sacromento, a land-based city in the midst of luxorious farms, and there are no "hurricanes" in December in the north Atlantic. The latter could be possible, but highly improbable. I wonder if Monsieur Verne wrote Passpoureau to be so idiotically French, always thinking and always screwing up with good intentions, and for Phileas Fogg toi be so rock-hard, without-an-emotion-in-his-life certain of everything. And the woman! Give me a break! For being a citizen of the state of love (France), Jules does a piss-pour job of convincing us that Fogg can love anything. It's a classic, this book. It's a mover, this book. But for that proverbial desert island, give me the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs anytime. He may not be "classic," but he is fun.more
I read this in Jr. High School and fell in love with Verne's novels. In 1872 Phileas Fogg wagers that he can circle the earth in eighty days; and traveling by steamer, railway, carriage, sledge, and elephant he wins his bet in seventy-nine days, twenty-three hours, and fifty-seven minutes. Verne builds the suspense and populates the book with strange places and characters that makes it difficult to put down. I would recommend this to dreamers and readers of all ages.more
This book was a tricky one to get my hands on. It was hiding in a box in my basement. Now its up in my room comfortably now that its been read. its was the story of an inventor from Britain, who teamed up with his faithful servant to circumnavigate the globe.I thought it was a great story line. Lots of change happens to the characters throughout the journey. THE BOOK IS MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH BETTER THAN THE MOVIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!more
(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.)A couple of years ago, when I did a write-up of Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea for the "CCLaP 100" essay series, I heard from a number of his fans that part of the reason I found it rather lackluster was because of the free but ancient translation I had read, and that Verne is one of those cases where it really pays to seek out and even purchase the most recent translations that you can find. And that's because it's only been in literally the last 20 or 30 years, since genre work has really started gaining academic respect, that we've even wanted to go back and explore the beginnings of things like science-fiction or crime novels, and to apply a scholarly eye to such original material; but for a century before that, the dozens of fantastical titles put out by someone like Verne were considered by most to be the literary version of throwaway kiddie shows, pumped out quickly and cheaply to soon part an adolescent from his allowance money at the corner drugstore on a Saturday afternoon, and usually translated on the fly by overworked copyeditors who could care less if they were successfully capturing the subtleties of the original text.So I was glad to recently come across Amazing Journeys: Five Visionary Classics by Jules Verne, a new collection of some of his most famous novels, edited and translated by the quite obvious slavish fan and full-time scholar Frederick Paul Walter, put out in a plain but professional oversized edition and containing all the books' original illustrations. And indeed, as I learned while reading through these 'Anglicized' new translations (i.e. they feature standard measurements and Fahrenheit temperatures), Verne's work at its best contained a kind of dry humor and political awareness that we in the English-speaking world rarely equate with the French speculative pioneer, with dialogue that's not nearly as histrionic as we've come to think of it in books like these, which to be fair really were pumped out originally on a fairly quick basis mostly for the amusement of children and the working class, a series of 54 novels known as the "Extraordinary Voyages" that publisher Jules Hetzel built an entire little commercial empire around, and just like today with most of the duo's revenue coming not from the books themselves but rather the lucrative traveling stage adaptations that were often made of them. And in fact, a full reading of Verne's entire oeuvre remains a personal challenge that I will only tackle much later in life if at all, so I decided not to read even the full five tales collected here, and especially like I said since I had already read 20,000 Leagues and didn't relish the thought of slogging through the entire thing again.So instead I read just two of the titles in this collection, starting with 1864's Journey to the Center of the Earth, one of Verne's first speculative tales after first being an opera librettist for years, while lying to his father the whole time and claiming that he was establishing a fine career in Paris as a young urban lawyer. And indeed, this early thriller shows off what I consider one of the modern main weaknesses of Verne's work, no matter how good the translation; that many of the fanciful scientific theories he proposed in his books have turned out over the decades to be just flat-out wrong, which means that we no longer have the ability to enjoy his work in the same way his contemporary audience did. (Don't forget, readers in the 1800s thought of Verne not so much as a sci-fi author but more like Michael Crichton, a brilliant futurist writing day-after-tomorrow tales about what life would really be like for their children.) Essentially the tale of an eccentric German professor, his nephew assistant and their silent Icelandic guide, as they literally climb down a volcano and discover a vast continent-sized system of caves below the Earth's surface, complete with their own bodies of water and rainclouds, it's hard not to roll one's eyes when watching our heroes stumble across forgotten dinosaurs and house-sized mushrooms, or ride a lava eruption back out to the surface at the end as if they were Victorian surfers; although the story definitely has its charms as well, especially when thinking of it now as pure fairytale fantasy, and with there being lots to enjoy in the cartoonish stereotypes that come with each of our various characters.Ah, but then after that, I skipped straight to the last story in this collection, and undoubtedly the most famous of Verne's career as well, 1873's Around the World in Eighty Days, which has been made into high-profile films several times now over the years, and which turned out to be a much better reading experience. Basically a gentle satire of British stiff-upper-lip determinism in the height of their Empire years, it starts with a group of upper-class gentlemen at a private London club discussing the latest innovations in world travel, with the reclusive and unflappable Phileas Fogg quietly insisting to his peers that a globe-spanning trip could now be realistically accomplished in a flat 80 days, even wagering what today would be two million dollars on the deal and agreeing to leave on such a journey that very night, armed with nothing but an overnight bag and his loyal French butler. And thus starts a rollicking adventure that indeed takes us around the world, spiced up by a British P.I. in Raj India who mistakes Fogg for a fugitive bank robber and tries to trip up his plans the whole rest of the way, and with the incredible journey involving such details as an elephant ride across central Asia, a sudden alliance with Chinese acrobats, a deliberately planned mutiny on a British sea vessel, a shootout with Native Americans on a train ride across the American Midwest, and a whole lot more. (Although let it be noted that the original book features no hot-air balloons, an invention of Hollywood that has become a famous trope of its own by now.)And in fact, I'm sure that a big reason why this succeeds so much more than Journey to the Center of the Earth is that, unlike the outdated speculative nature of the former, Eighty Days is a faithful and now historical look at just what it was like to really pull off world travel in the late 1800s, the first time in history it became commercially viable for anyone besides pirates and explorers to even do so. (And indeed, just a year before Verne wrote his novel, Thomas Cook led history's very first trip around the world designed specifically for tourists, only in their case taking seven months to complete instead of Verne's three.) And that makes the book charming and fascinating instead of eye-rolling, and especially when adding Verne's astutely funny comments regarding imperial aspirations, and of the self-satisfyingly civilized way the British liked to think of themselves during the height of the Victorian Age. (Unlike his reputation in later movies, much of the humor in the original book comes from the conservative, adventure-hating Fogg maintaining such complete composure in the face of such globetrotting chaos, spending the majority of his 80-day trip not enjoying the scenery but playing an endless series of card games with his fellow steamship and railroad passengers.) And that's a delight to read about even today, no matter how dated the actual mechanics of the story itself. (And in fact, gonzo journalists have been recreating the trip in a period-faithful way almost since the publication of the book itself, from an 1889 newspaper reporter to most recently comedian Michael Palin, just a few years ago for a BBC television mini-series.)So it was nice, I admit, to see what all these Verne fans were talking about, as far as the surprising loveliness of his original texts, that for so long have been hidden from us English speakers by shoddy translations; but also like I said, I'm not sure just how much of a general interest I have in Verne even with the new translations, making a sampler like this nearly perfect for the casual fan. It comes highly recommended, but be prepared for it to be one of those volumes you read in little doses here and there for years to come.Out of 10: 9.1more
One of the few Jules Verne novels I had never read until this week. The pace is the best part. Thrill/Spy novelists should read this several times to get an idea how one should pace a great action novel.more
I was frankly amazed at how good this book was. I expected a slow reading, dated adventure; I found a great page turning, well-crafted novel. I won't disclose any of the plot line; Suffice it to say that I was surprised by the twists and depth of the story and you should be too!more
I must admit that my motivation to read this book came from the book and TV series by Michael Palin (who attempted to go around the world in eighty days strangely enough in the 1980s). Palin’s journey was inspired by this classic.As you can probably guess, this book deals with Phileas Fogg’s attempt to go around the world in eighty days in the 1800s. Accompanied by his new but trusty servant, Passepartout, he leaves the Reform Club, London promising to return back in exactly eighty days. Armed with a book of timetables of ships and trains (as well as good luck), they begin their journey. However, Detective Fix is on Fogg’s trail, suspecting him of stealing from the Bank of England. Add to this a ride on an elephant, rescue of a young widow, a meeting with the Sioux and a circus troupe (not at the same time) and like Fogg, this book never stops. One thing you will learn is longitude and latitude in an important but fun way!I found this book fast paced and interesting. It read like a modern book to me, I had no problems with language or dreary bits. Fogg’s trip was interesting from both a cultural and historical perspective. Passepartout was just gorgeous with his devotion to Fogg and his journey.If you’ve never read a classic, I suggest you start with this one – it’s short and feels completely modern.more
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Reviews

A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).more
Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!more
As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.more
I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.more
So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.more
Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
This is a fun book filled with out-dated stereotypes, unlikely luck and a kick-ass ending. It should be required reading for travel students everywhere ;)more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
For my Independent Reading Book Project, I read "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne. The novel is about an English man named Phileas Fogg, his servant, Jean Passepartout, and their journey in hopes of circumnavigating the world in a mere eighty days. His motivation? Winning a bet of twenty-thousand pounds. Well, that and bragging rights. Immediately after the bet was made, Mr. Fogg and Passepartout depart the continent. In this very suspenseful plot line, the travelers jump from steamer to railway, all the while being trailed by a sneaky detective. With several twists and turns woven into the book, you are on edge from cover to cover. Moreover, in the back of your mind you are always thinking: Will they finish the journey in time?I appreciated how geographically educational this book was (although some chapters were a bit ‘school-syllabus’ type). In addition, there was always something arising—never a dull moment in this fast-paced book. Even though the character development was lacking, Verne wrote it in such a way that you felt as if you were tagging alongside the main characters, experiencing the great enterprise with them. Overall, this great read is a classic adventure story that has stood the test of time. If you want to have a laugh while reading a well-written book, "Around the World in Eighty Days" is for you!more
“Around the World in 80 days” by Jules Verne is about the adventures of Mr. Fogg’s and his hired, French, hand Passepartout. After making a bet that he, Mr. Fogg, could make it around the world in 80 days he and Passepartout set out to win. I believe that Jules Verne wrote this book to show how anything is possible and even if something might seem ridiculous at first, things can turn out to be quite an adventure.In the book, Mr. Fogg is often ridiculed and questioned. He still keeps going and ends up saving and meeting Auoda, who he will later marry. Mr. Fogg brings joy because of his easiness and his courage to keep going, even though there were many challenges in his way. With his courage he is able to travel around the world in 80 days and do the unthinkable in that time.Another example would be at this part in the book were Mr. Fogg and Passepartout are charged with thievery. While Passepartout is freaking out, Mr. Fogg stays relax and bails them out. Staying calm and relaxed keeps them on their way and adds a new adventure to their trip. Through this all you’re just hoping that they will keep their heads and keep on their way so that they can arrive on time. The last example would be how at the beginning this bet and trip around the world in 80 days seemed ridiculous but later it brought them this new knowledge of the world and plenty new adventures. On just his belief and faith that they could make it around the world in 80 days made the whole trip possible because it brought fierceness into reaching their goal. In conclusion, this book brings a new idea of sticking to an idea and following it through because in the end you will gain new stories and memories. That is exactly what happens to Mr. Fogg and Passepartout, they stuck to this insane idea and in the end got a garden full of memories.more
In Around the World in 80 Days, Jules Verne's main character, Phileas Fogg, is presented with a challenge. To journey around the world, all in 80 days. Phileas' attitude towards the journey is naive, but his servant, Passepartout, is worrisome about the journey, and the various gains and losses of time on their schedule.The book takes you on a journey, around the world in 80 days, with the characters. I think that this book provides a great reading environment, as well as an overall experience. Many people have had the same as I have, therefore making this book a classic.more
Review of Around the World in Eighty DaysThe book, Around the World in Eighty Days, by Jules Verne is a book about a man named Phileas Fogg who claims that it is possible to travel around the world in eighty days. He then gets challenged to do this himself. This book gets more exciting and dramatic every time you turn the page.One of the main reasons this book keeps you on the edge of your seat is that you don't know if Phileas will be able to make the deadline and win the bet of traveling around the world in eighty days. Also, throughout the course of the book Phileas turns from a cold calculative man, to a more outgoing energetic man. “I say, you do have a heart!' “Sometimes,” he replied, 'When I have the time.” This quote shows that the character is still his old self partly, but he has also transformed into a warmer person. Like many adventures, money is something that drives this story, “A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager.” That wager is something that enhances the story and makes it more exciting.Jules Verne has produced a number of adventure novels, but none quite like this one. This book shows just how mad adventure can be. If you love adventure novels, you should definitely check this book out. Jules Verne makes adventure come to life in Around the World in Eighty Days.more
Substance: A travelogue and catalogue of "modern" transportation inventions, yet the story is engaging as well, despite its absurd contrivances. Verne has a droll humour.Note: The annotations are occasionally helpful, but so is a good dictionary. For some reason, many very obvious archaisms and forgotten "current news items" are not explained.more
I'm not sure which translation I read (it was the free English one on the Gutenberg Project) but I wasn't really engaged by this. I didn't like the characters, save for Passepartout, and the trip didn't have the suspense or creativity I've come to expect from Verne.more
A version of Around the World in 80 Days done as a French language textbook reader with English introduction and notes. Useful for someone like me who loves the story and has only moderate skill in Frenchmore
A classic, with good reason. There was a certain amount of 'Deus ex machina', but it didn't detract from the enjoyment of the book. I found it interesting how Verne subtly brought up Phileas Fogg's despondency, at the end - it was a while before I clued in as to what Fogg was actually planning to do.While the story was delightful, I have a couple of quibbles with this particular edition:1. It doesn't say who the translator was; and2. I found at least 3 typos in the book. Proofreading!I chose this edition because it had interesting cover art and wasn't full of "book club" questions and endless commentary like most of the others - but the typos were disappointing, and omission of the translator's name baffling to say the least. Those things aside, the story was thoroughly enjoyable, and before I'd finished I was already wanting to read it again. Highly recommended - but try a different edition.more
Fantastic, so much fun. Can't believe it took this long for me to read this!more
 What a delightful book. It bears the tone of an unflappable gentleman of the world, and the travel tour across the globe, particularly Asia, is highly memorable. There is time enough to do good deeds as well, as when a young woman is rescued from the fate of suttee in India.more
This is the ultimate travel tale. It's full of adventure and suspense spiced with humor and romance. It's lighthearted fun, yet it touches on social issues of its era such as the status and treatment of women in India and opium use in China.It's interesting that, while there are lots of characters in the book, there is only one female. Her character is less developed than the male characters, and she has a mostly passive role in the action. I don't read many adventure novels, and I haven't read any of Verne's other books, so perhaps this is typical of the genre.This story lends itself well to reading aloud or listening to on audio. I listened to an audio version on a road trip and it made the time pass quickly.more
if i had read the original french, it probably would have been assigned five stars. Scholastic edition didn't even mention the translator! So the defects I have noticed may have come through the translation; i.e., there are no "wharves" in Sacromento, a land-based city in the midst of luxorious farms, and there are no "hurricanes" in December in the north Atlantic. The latter could be possible, but highly improbable. I wonder if Monsieur Verne wrote Passpoureau to be so idiotically French, always thinking and always screwing up with good intentions, and for Phileas Fogg toi be so rock-hard, without-an-emotion-in-his-life certain of everything. And the woman! Give me a break! For being a citizen of the state of love (France), Jules does a piss-pour job of convincing us that Fogg can love anything. It's a classic, this book. It's a mover, this book. But for that proverbial desert island, give me the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs anytime. He may not be "classic," but he is fun.more
I read this in Jr. High School and fell in love with Verne's novels. In 1872 Phileas Fogg wagers that he can circle the earth in eighty days; and traveling by steamer, railway, carriage, sledge, and elephant he wins his bet in seventy-nine days, twenty-three hours, and fifty-seven minutes. Verne builds the suspense and populates the book with strange places and characters that makes it difficult to put down. I would recommend this to dreamers and readers of all ages.more
This book was a tricky one to get my hands on. It was hiding in a box in my basement. Now its up in my room comfortably now that its been read. its was the story of an inventor from Britain, who teamed up with his faithful servant to circumnavigate the globe.I thought it was a great story line. Lots of change happens to the characters throughout the journey. THE BOOK IS MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH BETTER THAN THE MOVIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!more
(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.)A couple of years ago, when I did a write-up of Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea for the "CCLaP 100" essay series, I heard from a number of his fans that part of the reason I found it rather lackluster was because of the free but ancient translation I had read, and that Verne is one of those cases where it really pays to seek out and even purchase the most recent translations that you can find. And that's because it's only been in literally the last 20 or 30 years, since genre work has really started gaining academic respect, that we've even wanted to go back and explore the beginnings of things like science-fiction or crime novels, and to apply a scholarly eye to such original material; but for a century before that, the dozens of fantastical titles put out by someone like Verne were considered by most to be the literary version of throwaway kiddie shows, pumped out quickly and cheaply to soon part an adolescent from his allowance money at the corner drugstore on a Saturday afternoon, and usually translated on the fly by overworked copyeditors who could care less if they were successfully capturing the subtleties of the original text.So I was glad to recently come across Amazing Journeys: Five Visionary Classics by Jules Verne, a new collection of some of his most famous novels, edited and translated by the quite obvious slavish fan and full-time scholar Frederick Paul Walter, put out in a plain but professional oversized edition and containing all the books' original illustrations. And indeed, as I learned while reading through these 'Anglicized' new translations (i.e. they feature standard measurements and Fahrenheit temperatures), Verne's work at its best contained a kind of dry humor and political awareness that we in the English-speaking world rarely equate with the French speculative pioneer, with dialogue that's not nearly as histrionic as we've come to think of it in books like these, which to be fair really were pumped out originally on a fairly quick basis mostly for the amusement of children and the working class, a series of 54 novels known as the "Extraordinary Voyages" that publisher Jules Hetzel built an entire little commercial empire around, and just like today with most of the duo's revenue coming not from the books themselves but rather the lucrative traveling stage adaptations that were often made of them. And in fact, a full reading of Verne's entire oeuvre remains a personal challenge that I will only tackle much later in life if at all, so I decided not to read even the full five tales collected here, and especially like I said since I had already read 20,000 Leagues and didn't relish the thought of slogging through the entire thing again.So instead I read just two of the titles in this collection, starting with 1864's Journey to the Center of the Earth, one of Verne's first speculative tales after first being an opera librettist for years, while lying to his father the whole time and claiming that he was establishing a fine career in Paris as a young urban lawyer. And indeed, this early thriller shows off what I consider one of the modern main weaknesses of Verne's work, no matter how good the translation; that many of the fanciful scientific theories he proposed in his books have turned out over the decades to be just flat-out wrong, which means that we no longer have the ability to enjoy his work in the same way his contemporary audience did. (Don't forget, readers in the 1800s thought of Verne not so much as a sci-fi author but more like Michael Crichton, a brilliant futurist writing day-after-tomorrow tales about what life would really be like for their children.) Essentially the tale of an eccentric German professor, his nephew assistant and their silent Icelandic guide, as they literally climb down a volcano and discover a vast continent-sized system of caves below the Earth's surface, complete with their own bodies of water and rainclouds, it's hard not to roll one's eyes when watching our heroes stumble across forgotten dinosaurs and house-sized mushrooms, or ride a lava eruption back out to the surface at the end as if they were Victorian surfers; although the story definitely has its charms as well, especially when thinking of it now as pure fairytale fantasy, and with there being lots to enjoy in the cartoonish stereotypes that come with each of our various characters.Ah, but then after that, I skipped straight to the last story in this collection, and undoubtedly the most famous of Verne's career as well, 1873's Around the World in Eighty Days, which has been made into high-profile films several times now over the years, and which turned out to be a much better reading experience. Basically a gentle satire of British stiff-upper-lip determinism in the height of their Empire years, it starts with a group of upper-class gentlemen at a private London club discussing the latest innovations in world travel, with the reclusive and unflappable Phileas Fogg quietly insisting to his peers that a globe-spanning trip could now be realistically accomplished in a flat 80 days, even wagering what today would be two million dollars on the deal and agreeing to leave on such a journey that very night, armed with nothing but an overnight bag and his loyal French butler. And thus starts a rollicking adventure that indeed takes us around the world, spiced up by a British P.I. in Raj India who mistakes Fogg for a fugitive bank robber and tries to trip up his plans the whole rest of the way, and with the incredible journey involving such details as an elephant ride across central Asia, a sudden alliance with Chinese acrobats, a deliberately planned mutiny on a British sea vessel, a shootout with Native Americans on a train ride across the American Midwest, and a whole lot more. (Although let it be noted that the original book features no hot-air balloons, an invention of Hollywood that has become a famous trope of its own by now.)And in fact, I'm sure that a big reason why this succeeds so much more than Journey to the Center of the Earth is that, unlike the outdated speculative nature of the former, Eighty Days is a faithful and now historical look at just what it was like to really pull off world travel in the late 1800s, the first time in history it became commercially viable for anyone besides pirates and explorers to even do so. (And indeed, just a year before Verne wrote his novel, Thomas Cook led history's very first trip around the world designed specifically for tourists, only in their case taking seven months to complete instead of Verne's three.) And that makes the book charming and fascinating instead of eye-rolling, and especially when adding Verne's astutely funny comments regarding imperial aspirations, and of the self-satisfyingly civilized way the British liked to think of themselves during the height of the Victorian Age. (Unlike his reputation in later movies, much of the humor in the original book comes from the conservative, adventure-hating Fogg maintaining such complete composure in the face of such globetrotting chaos, spending the majority of his 80-day trip not enjoying the scenery but playing an endless series of card games with his fellow steamship and railroad passengers.) And that's a delight to read about even today, no matter how dated the actual mechanics of the story itself. (And in fact, gonzo journalists have been recreating the trip in a period-faithful way almost since the publication of the book itself, from an 1889 newspaper reporter to most recently comedian Michael Palin, just a few years ago for a BBC television mini-series.)So it was nice, I admit, to see what all these Verne fans were talking about, as far as the surprising loveliness of his original texts, that for so long have been hidden from us English speakers by shoddy translations; but also like I said, I'm not sure just how much of a general interest I have in Verne even with the new translations, making a sampler like this nearly perfect for the casual fan. It comes highly recommended, but be prepared for it to be one of those volumes you read in little doses here and there for years to come.Out of 10: 9.1more
One of the few Jules Verne novels I had never read until this week. The pace is the best part. Thrill/Spy novelists should read this several times to get an idea how one should pace a great action novel.more
I was frankly amazed at how good this book was. I expected a slow reading, dated adventure; I found a great page turning, well-crafted novel. I won't disclose any of the plot line; Suffice it to say that I was surprised by the twists and depth of the story and you should be too!more
I must admit that my motivation to read this book came from the book and TV series by Michael Palin (who attempted to go around the world in eighty days strangely enough in the 1980s). Palin’s journey was inspired by this classic.As you can probably guess, this book deals with Phileas Fogg’s attempt to go around the world in eighty days in the 1800s. Accompanied by his new but trusty servant, Passepartout, he leaves the Reform Club, London promising to return back in exactly eighty days. Armed with a book of timetables of ships and trains (as well as good luck), they begin their journey. However, Detective Fix is on Fogg’s trail, suspecting him of stealing from the Bank of England. Add to this a ride on an elephant, rescue of a young widow, a meeting with the Sioux and a circus troupe (not at the same time) and like Fogg, this book never stops. One thing you will learn is longitude and latitude in an important but fun way!I found this book fast paced and interesting. It read like a modern book to me, I had no problems with language or dreary bits. Fogg’s trip was interesting from both a cultural and historical perspective. Passepartout was just gorgeous with his devotion to Fogg and his journey.If you’ve never read a classic, I suggest you start with this one – it’s short and feels completely modern.more
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