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Considered by many to be Dickens' finest novel, Great Expectations traces the growth of the book's narrator, Philip Pirrip (Pip), from a boy of shallow dreams to a man with depth of character. From its famous dramatic opening on the bleak Kentish marshes, the story abounds with some of Dickens' most memorable characters. 


Among them are the kindly blacksmith Joe Gargery, the mysterious convict Abel Magwitch, the eccentric Miss Haversham and her beautiful ward Estella, Pip's good-hearted room-mate Herbert Pocket and the pompous Pumblechook.

As Pip unravels the truth behind his own 'great expectations' in his quest to become a gentleman, the mysteries of the past and the convolutions of fate through a series of thrilling adventures serve to steer him towards maturity and his most important discovery of all - the truth about himself.

Published: Wordsworth Editions an imprint of Vearsa Limited on
ISBN: 9781848703605
List price: $2.49
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Favourite story of all time, it has everything. A work of genius.more
It's kind of weird to imagine how I can completely have avoided this book and any adaptations thereof, but up to now, I have. It's one of those things I've always meant to get round to, but never have until now -- at least in the book form: I'm not much one for sitting and watching things. Really I only got round to it because I realised I had the free ebook downloaded, and I wanted something quick and easy to read, even though this isn't exactly the appropriate time of year... I wouldn't normally describe Dickens as "quick and easy", but A Christmas Carol really isn't bad. The style isn't too overwrought. There are sections of thick description, but the whole thing has an easy tone, starting right at the beginning:

Mind! I don’t mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade.

Obviously, the story gets more serious, since it's a moral one, about the meaning of Christmas and about the value of Christian charity. It still has an air of the Christmas cheer about it, the whole way through, except maybe for the part with the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come. The story is pretty simple: not many characters, just various lives all followed by each of the ghosts, with Scrooge at the center of the story. I was expecting him to be somewhat more terrible, from the sort of general cultural impression I got -- although of course, he's bad enough as it is, mostly in his ignorance and silly bad temper. Of course, the part where he refuses to give to charity makes him seem pretty awful, too.

The character development which is the entire point of the story is a little overdone, maybe, but it all adds to the good feeling of "yay, everything is better now", at the end.

The moralising didn't really bother me. It's a classic story, and the moralising is part and parcel of that. I even liked a lot of the description in this, though in most Dickens novels the level of description used to frustrate me. Mind you, I should try again now I'm older and wiser.

(Note: The writing isn't on the writing or anything objective, since I don't believe one can be objective about stuff like this. It's purely based on how much I loved the story, whether I would reread it again. As a piece of literature, I'd reflexively rate it higher, but I don't really want to: I "liked" it, but not "really liked".)more
A great story that everyone should read (or at least watch the movie version with the Muppets!).more
I pick up these graphic novels out of curiosity to find out how these are done. This is first and most popular "Christmas book' by Dickens. It was pretty much a fast read - done in 20 minutes at most. Bright artwork and precise story-telling.more
I agree that in this day and age the story is trite, predictuable, overdone and a bit Pollyanna but I think it was quite original for its time and many a story nowadays has gained inspriation from this tale.more
I agree that in this day and age the story is trite, predictuable, overdone and a bit Pollyanna but I think it was quite original for its time and many a story nowadays has gained inspriation from this tale.more
There's not much to say about this book that hasn't already said by many others (and said better than I am capable of). Obviously, it's a great book. It's a classic for a reason. That said, this was my first foray into Dickens, and two things struck me about this book:

1.) I was genuninely shocked to realize that Dickens had a sense of humor! I chuckled out loud a couple of times. For some reason, I expected this to be a very serious book, and it really was not.

2.) I was also genuninely shocked by how closely the movie adaptations follow the book...something that never happens. Granted, this is such a short book, it's easy to remain true to it. But even the Mickey Mouse version is pretty darn accurate!

It was a great read for our December bookclub meeting...festive AND short. Glad I finally got around to reading this one.more
*** This was a reread. I originally read this book many years ago, and have seen and heard numerous variations since. This time around I listened to the audiobook narrated by Jim Dale, who can do no wrong in my eyes ears.more
A trifle heavy-handed on the religion, but only a trifle, and it is a story about Christmas. In any case, one of Dickens' classics, and deservedly so.more
My partner used to read this out loud to our children each year. The children...well, they protested. But we love it, every plummy word.more
We listened to this on the way to my parents' house for Christmas. It was perfect. Dickens has an amazing way with descriptions... he's just delightful. My only complaint about the audio version I listened to (read by Anton Lesser) was that it was so quiet one second and then SO LOUD the next! His variation in voices was great, but he needed to think about poor people trying to adjust and readjust their volume constantly so as to be able to hear it but not get blasted out of their seats.

Read this Christmas season 2011. It was really delightful.more
Obviously, a good book. There's no question there. What surprised me was how easy it was to get through. Dickens has been a bit of a problem for me in the past; I just want the story to get moving. I don't know if it was my familiarity with the story or simply that the book moved faster, but it was fun to read.more
I'd never read it before, and wanted to experience the original unintermediated by film. My impressions: Dickens accomplished a HELL of a lot here in only 73 pages. Today's mercilessly deconstructed authors could go back to this dense style and I wouldn't mind a bit.

What you get in the book that you don't in the movies is Dickens' evocation (not quite construction, but almost) of what we now think of as a traditional Christmas. His descriptions of the holiday as celebrated in London and in Scrooge's nephew's house have been the basis and the aspirations of the December celebrations of the entire English-speaking world ever since. Would he have been happy with how this had turned out over 100 years later? Who can say?more
Who does not know the story? This is my fourth time through A Christmas Carol and each time reveals something new. I am currently in the midst of reading God and Charles Dickens: Recovering the Christian Voice of a Classic Author by Gary Colledge, and this time through the Christian references were much more poignant. The illustrations in this edition were a very nice addition, and it is nice to see a standard Kindle edition with them. The book would always get 5 stars, and the Kindle version does as well.more
This timeless classic has some emotional truth for Dickens. He traveled to the heart of his own emotional loneliness as a young child, packed off the work in a blacking factory because his father was imprisoned for debts. He fictionalised this loneliness in the figure of the young Scrooge, who is left alone at school each Christmas. In a simplistic, but compelling psychological analysis, he portrays Scrooge as a man who has built a wall of money around himself to defeat the loneliness of his childhood.This book has sentimental value to me, and I love reading this at Christmas time each year, as I follow Ebenezer through a journey of discovery. The three ghosts who appear to haunt Scrooge out of his uncharitable ways. Christmas past taking him back to his childhood, abandoned at school over the festive season, and the happy days of his youth as a clerk in London engaged to the daughter of the wonderfully named Mr Fezzywig. His bitter regret as he foolishly drives her away before his increasingly miserly ways. He is deeply saddened at the sense of a wasted life. The ghost of Christmas present then takes him out to the snowy streets to see how others, such as the family of his humble clerk Bob Cratchit are celebrating. But it is the third ghost, the terrifying grim reaper of Christmas yet to come, who really has an affect on Scrooge. Seeing his own death, lying forgotten as the very linen from his bed is stolen and sold by the people hated him. He suddenly realises how alone and unhappy he is and how his life could be if he had a change of disposition, and helped others as he would be able to do.So Scrooge becomes a changed man, promising to help care for Tiny Tim and finally accepting his nephew's invitation to join his own family on Christmas morning.more
I chose A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens because I have watched many movie adaptions of the book and I wanted to see the differences between the books and the films. The book also happens to be part of my book collection and had been sitting in dust for quite some time. The book is about an old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge who owns a counting house. He’s a grouchy man who never has a kind word to say to anybody and only cares about business. On Christmas eve, he is visited by the ghost of his old partner, Jacob Marley who warns him that unless he change his way, he will suffer a bad fate when he dies and that he will be visited by three ghosts.The three ghosts show him his past, present and future to show Scrooge how badly he treated others and Scrooge reflects upon it all and becomes a better man.After reading the book, I can see why it has been adapted so many times for film or for theatre. The book has vivid imagery, it’s fast paced and a relatively simple story that it is easy to make a film adaption with little alteration to the story.I enjoyed reading the book; I thought the story was imaginative and innovative for something written in the 18th century. I was a bit worried that it would be too old fashioned, full of flowery language with passages that drag out but it was easy to read language wise and pace wise.more
Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.more
Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.more
Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.more
Summary: A classic tale about a mean old man named Ebenezer Scrooge who counts his money on Christmas Eve. He mistreats his employee. Three spirits come to visit him. Each brings with them a lesson for him to learn. The first is the spirit of Christmas past from which he revisits his childhood and who he once was. He then is visited by the spirit of Christmas present from whom he gets to see the personal lives of the people in his every day life and how he has affected them. The last spirit is the ghost of Christmas yet to come. This one shows him what his future looks like if he continues down his mean spirited path. He is then given a chance to redeem himself. Personal Reaction: A classic we all grew up knowing about either through reading, movies, or tv shows, but I have always enjoyed actually reading the classic original story. I never considered the fact before that this would be considered historical fiction until I took this class. Its set in mid 1800's. Classroom extension: This would be a little tricky per most schools do happy holidays or celebrate winter, and not Christmas itself. I could have the children reflect on their own holiday/winter memories. We could compare and contrast how they lived in that time period this was set in to the way we live today We could watch one of the movies made from this story and have the kids compare and contrast the differences from the book to the movie. To see what the director changed and kept the same.more
Summary: A classic tale about a mean old man named Ebenezer Scrooge who counts his money on Christmas Eve. He mistreats his employee. Three spirits come to visit him. Each brings with them a lesson for him to learn. The first is the spirit of Christmas past from which he revisits his childhood and who he once was. He then is visited by the spirit of Christmas present from whom he gets to see the personal lives of the people in his every day life and how he has affected them. The last spirit is the ghost of Christmas yet to come. This one shows him what his future looks like if he continues down his mean spirited path. He is then given a chance to redeem himself. Personal Reaction: A classic we all grew up knowing about either through reading, movies, or tv shows, but I have always enjoyed actually reading the classic original story. I never considered the fact before that this would be considered historical fiction until I took this class. Its set in mid 1800's. Classroom extension: This would be a little tricky per most schools do happy holidays or celebrate winter, and not Christmas itself. I could have the children reflect on their own holiday/winter memories. We could compare and contrast how they lived in that time period this was set in to the way we live today We could watch one of the movies made from this story and have the kids compare and contrast the differences from the book to the movie. To see what the director changed and kept the same.more
A classic holiday tale that I had failed to read all these years! Upon picking it up I assumed it would be boring and dull, given that we simply all know this story by heart. Surprisingly it wasn't that at all! It was alive and interesting in ways I didn't expect, and of course the language and writing style is so beautiful that I could enjoy anything written by him.more
A classic holiday tale that I had failed to read all these years! Upon picking it up I assumed it would be boring and dull, given that we simply all know this story by heart. Surprisingly it wasn't that at all! It was alive and interesting in ways I didn't expect, and of course the language and writing style is so beautiful that I could enjoy anything written by him.more
Great story, love the way the ghosts show Scrooge that he's going wrong, and how Scrooge alters his life for the better.In a very short novel we get to know many different characters, and we get to know them well and feel for their troubles like they're our friends.Though Scrooge is horrible at first, I also felt for him; it seems like he just doesn't know any better, but he is still being punished. The last ghost is especially horrific, and I really felt for Scrooge.Fortunately he gets his second chance, and all's well that ends well :)more
A Christmas Carol is by far the most well written short story I have ever read. The last time I read this story I came away with a greater appreciation for Dickens' breathtaking skill as a writer. His use of words and phrases and the rhythm of his writing draws you in and the story itself keeps you there.Determined curmudgeon Ebeneezer Scrooge is literally spooked back into humanity after being visited by three Christmas ghosts. Through these uninvited supernatural guests Scrooge is forced into painful self-examination and is given a chilling warning of what will happen if he does not change his ways. Though set during the Christmas season, A Christmas Carol, carries lessons that are applicable for every day. From the first time I read it in my teens until today the overarching message I take away from the story is the importance of relationships in our lives. When we shut out others through selfishness or fear of being hurt we become impoverished regardless of what our bank statement says. A Christmas Carol is a story well worth coming back to any time of the year and is a good reminder of what really matters when we get too caught up in the stresses of the holiday season.more
A Christmas Carol is by far the most well written short story I have ever read. The last time I read this story I came away with a greater appreciation for Dickens' breathtaking skill as a writer. His use of words and phrases and the rhythm of his writing draws you in and the story itself keeps you there.Determined curmudgeon Ebeneezer Scrooge is literally spooked back into humanity after being visited by three Christmas ghosts. Through these uninvited supernatural guests Scrooge is forced into painful self-examination and is given a chilling warning of what will happen if he does not change his ways. Though set during the Christmas season, A Christmas Carol, carries lessons that are applicable for every day. From the first time I read it in my teens until today the overarching message I take away from the story is the importance of relationships in our lives. When we shut out others through selfishness or fear of being hurt we become impoverished regardless of what our bank statement says. A Christmas Carol is a story well worth coming back to any time of the year and is a good reminder of what really matters when we get too caught up in the stresses of the holiday season.more
A Christmas Carol is by far the most well written short story I have ever read. The last time I read this story I came away with a greater appreciation for Dickens' breathtaking skill as a writer. His use of words and phrases and the rhythm of his writing draws you in and the story itself keeps you there.Determined curmudgeon Ebeneezer Scrooge is literally spooked back into humanity after being visited by three Christmas ghosts. Through these uninvited supernatural guests Scrooge is forced into painful self-examination and is given a chilling warning of what will happen if he does not change his ways. Though set during the Christmas season, A Christmas Carol, carries lessons that are applicable for every day. From the first time I read it in my teens until today the overarching message I take away from the story is the importance of relationships in our lives. When we shut out others through selfishness or fear of being hurt we become impoverished regardless of what our bank statement says. A Christmas Carol is a story well worth coming back to any time of the year and is a good reminder of what really matters when we get too caught up in the stresses of the holiday season.more
Read all 131 reviews

Reviews

Favourite story of all time, it has everything. A work of genius.more
It's kind of weird to imagine how I can completely have avoided this book and any adaptations thereof, but up to now, I have. It's one of those things I've always meant to get round to, but never have until now -- at least in the book form: I'm not much one for sitting and watching things. Really I only got round to it because I realised I had the free ebook downloaded, and I wanted something quick and easy to read, even though this isn't exactly the appropriate time of year... I wouldn't normally describe Dickens as "quick and easy", but A Christmas Carol really isn't bad. The style isn't too overwrought. There are sections of thick description, but the whole thing has an easy tone, starting right at the beginning:

Mind! I don’t mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade.

Obviously, the story gets more serious, since it's a moral one, about the meaning of Christmas and about the value of Christian charity. It still has an air of the Christmas cheer about it, the whole way through, except maybe for the part with the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come. The story is pretty simple: not many characters, just various lives all followed by each of the ghosts, with Scrooge at the center of the story. I was expecting him to be somewhat more terrible, from the sort of general cultural impression I got -- although of course, he's bad enough as it is, mostly in his ignorance and silly bad temper. Of course, the part where he refuses to give to charity makes him seem pretty awful, too.

The character development which is the entire point of the story is a little overdone, maybe, but it all adds to the good feeling of "yay, everything is better now", at the end.

The moralising didn't really bother me. It's a classic story, and the moralising is part and parcel of that. I even liked a lot of the description in this, though in most Dickens novels the level of description used to frustrate me. Mind you, I should try again now I'm older and wiser.

(Note: The writing isn't on the writing or anything objective, since I don't believe one can be objective about stuff like this. It's purely based on how much I loved the story, whether I would reread it again. As a piece of literature, I'd reflexively rate it higher, but I don't really want to: I "liked" it, but not "really liked".)more
A great story that everyone should read (or at least watch the movie version with the Muppets!).more
I pick up these graphic novels out of curiosity to find out how these are done. This is first and most popular "Christmas book' by Dickens. It was pretty much a fast read - done in 20 minutes at most. Bright artwork and precise story-telling.more
I agree that in this day and age the story is trite, predictuable, overdone and a bit Pollyanna but I think it was quite original for its time and many a story nowadays has gained inspriation from this tale.more
I agree that in this day and age the story is trite, predictuable, overdone and a bit Pollyanna but I think it was quite original for its time and many a story nowadays has gained inspriation from this tale.more
There's not much to say about this book that hasn't already said by many others (and said better than I am capable of). Obviously, it's a great book. It's a classic for a reason. That said, this was my first foray into Dickens, and two things struck me about this book:

1.) I was genuninely shocked to realize that Dickens had a sense of humor! I chuckled out loud a couple of times. For some reason, I expected this to be a very serious book, and it really was not.

2.) I was also genuninely shocked by how closely the movie adaptations follow the book...something that never happens. Granted, this is such a short book, it's easy to remain true to it. But even the Mickey Mouse version is pretty darn accurate!

It was a great read for our December bookclub meeting...festive AND short. Glad I finally got around to reading this one.more
*** This was a reread. I originally read this book many years ago, and have seen and heard numerous variations since. This time around I listened to the audiobook narrated by Jim Dale, who can do no wrong in my eyes ears.more
A trifle heavy-handed on the religion, but only a trifle, and it is a story about Christmas. In any case, one of Dickens' classics, and deservedly so.more
My partner used to read this out loud to our children each year. The children...well, they protested. But we love it, every plummy word.more
We listened to this on the way to my parents' house for Christmas. It was perfect. Dickens has an amazing way with descriptions... he's just delightful. My only complaint about the audio version I listened to (read by Anton Lesser) was that it was so quiet one second and then SO LOUD the next! His variation in voices was great, but he needed to think about poor people trying to adjust and readjust their volume constantly so as to be able to hear it but not get blasted out of their seats.

Read this Christmas season 2011. It was really delightful.more
Obviously, a good book. There's no question there. What surprised me was how easy it was to get through. Dickens has been a bit of a problem for me in the past; I just want the story to get moving. I don't know if it was my familiarity with the story or simply that the book moved faster, but it was fun to read.more
I'd never read it before, and wanted to experience the original unintermediated by film. My impressions: Dickens accomplished a HELL of a lot here in only 73 pages. Today's mercilessly deconstructed authors could go back to this dense style and I wouldn't mind a bit.

What you get in the book that you don't in the movies is Dickens' evocation (not quite construction, but almost) of what we now think of as a traditional Christmas. His descriptions of the holiday as celebrated in London and in Scrooge's nephew's house have been the basis and the aspirations of the December celebrations of the entire English-speaking world ever since. Would he have been happy with how this had turned out over 100 years later? Who can say?more
Who does not know the story? This is my fourth time through A Christmas Carol and each time reveals something new. I am currently in the midst of reading God and Charles Dickens: Recovering the Christian Voice of a Classic Author by Gary Colledge, and this time through the Christian references were much more poignant. The illustrations in this edition were a very nice addition, and it is nice to see a standard Kindle edition with them. The book would always get 5 stars, and the Kindle version does as well.more
This timeless classic has some emotional truth for Dickens. He traveled to the heart of his own emotional loneliness as a young child, packed off the work in a blacking factory because his father was imprisoned for debts. He fictionalised this loneliness in the figure of the young Scrooge, who is left alone at school each Christmas. In a simplistic, but compelling psychological analysis, he portrays Scrooge as a man who has built a wall of money around himself to defeat the loneliness of his childhood.This book has sentimental value to me, and I love reading this at Christmas time each year, as I follow Ebenezer through a journey of discovery. The three ghosts who appear to haunt Scrooge out of his uncharitable ways. Christmas past taking him back to his childhood, abandoned at school over the festive season, and the happy days of his youth as a clerk in London engaged to the daughter of the wonderfully named Mr Fezzywig. His bitter regret as he foolishly drives her away before his increasingly miserly ways. He is deeply saddened at the sense of a wasted life. The ghost of Christmas present then takes him out to the snowy streets to see how others, such as the family of his humble clerk Bob Cratchit are celebrating. But it is the third ghost, the terrifying grim reaper of Christmas yet to come, who really has an affect on Scrooge. Seeing his own death, lying forgotten as the very linen from his bed is stolen and sold by the people hated him. He suddenly realises how alone and unhappy he is and how his life could be if he had a change of disposition, and helped others as he would be able to do.So Scrooge becomes a changed man, promising to help care for Tiny Tim and finally accepting his nephew's invitation to join his own family on Christmas morning.more
I chose A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens because I have watched many movie adaptions of the book and I wanted to see the differences between the books and the films. The book also happens to be part of my book collection and had been sitting in dust for quite some time. The book is about an old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge who owns a counting house. He’s a grouchy man who never has a kind word to say to anybody and only cares about business. On Christmas eve, he is visited by the ghost of his old partner, Jacob Marley who warns him that unless he change his way, he will suffer a bad fate when he dies and that he will be visited by three ghosts.The three ghosts show him his past, present and future to show Scrooge how badly he treated others and Scrooge reflects upon it all and becomes a better man.After reading the book, I can see why it has been adapted so many times for film or for theatre. The book has vivid imagery, it’s fast paced and a relatively simple story that it is easy to make a film adaption with little alteration to the story.I enjoyed reading the book; I thought the story was imaginative and innovative for something written in the 18th century. I was a bit worried that it would be too old fashioned, full of flowery language with passages that drag out but it was easy to read language wise and pace wise.more
Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.more
Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.more
Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.more
Summary: A classic tale about a mean old man named Ebenezer Scrooge who counts his money on Christmas Eve. He mistreats his employee. Three spirits come to visit him. Each brings with them a lesson for him to learn. The first is the spirit of Christmas past from which he revisits his childhood and who he once was. He then is visited by the spirit of Christmas present from whom he gets to see the personal lives of the people in his every day life and how he has affected them. The last spirit is the ghost of Christmas yet to come. This one shows him what his future looks like if he continues down his mean spirited path. He is then given a chance to redeem himself. Personal Reaction: A classic we all grew up knowing about either through reading, movies, or tv shows, but I have always enjoyed actually reading the classic original story. I never considered the fact before that this would be considered historical fiction until I took this class. Its set in mid 1800's. Classroom extension: This would be a little tricky per most schools do happy holidays or celebrate winter, and not Christmas itself. I could have the children reflect on their own holiday/winter memories. We could compare and contrast how they lived in that time period this was set in to the way we live today We could watch one of the movies made from this story and have the kids compare and contrast the differences from the book to the movie. To see what the director changed and kept the same.more
Summary: A classic tale about a mean old man named Ebenezer Scrooge who counts his money on Christmas Eve. He mistreats his employee. Three spirits come to visit him. Each brings with them a lesson for him to learn. The first is the spirit of Christmas past from which he revisits his childhood and who he once was. He then is visited by the spirit of Christmas present from whom he gets to see the personal lives of the people in his every day life and how he has affected them. The last spirit is the ghost of Christmas yet to come. This one shows him what his future looks like if he continues down his mean spirited path. He is then given a chance to redeem himself. Personal Reaction: A classic we all grew up knowing about either through reading, movies, or tv shows, but I have always enjoyed actually reading the classic original story. I never considered the fact before that this would be considered historical fiction until I took this class. Its set in mid 1800's. Classroom extension: This would be a little tricky per most schools do happy holidays or celebrate winter, and not Christmas itself. I could have the children reflect on their own holiday/winter memories. We could compare and contrast how they lived in that time period this was set in to the way we live today We could watch one of the movies made from this story and have the kids compare and contrast the differences from the book to the movie. To see what the director changed and kept the same.more
A classic holiday tale that I had failed to read all these years! Upon picking it up I assumed it would be boring and dull, given that we simply all know this story by heart. Surprisingly it wasn't that at all! It was alive and interesting in ways I didn't expect, and of course the language and writing style is so beautiful that I could enjoy anything written by him.more
A classic holiday tale that I had failed to read all these years! Upon picking it up I assumed it would be boring and dull, given that we simply all know this story by heart. Surprisingly it wasn't that at all! It was alive and interesting in ways I didn't expect, and of course the language and writing style is so beautiful that I could enjoy anything written by him.more
Great story, love the way the ghosts show Scrooge that he's going wrong, and how Scrooge alters his life for the better.In a very short novel we get to know many different characters, and we get to know them well and feel for their troubles like they're our friends.Though Scrooge is horrible at first, I also felt for him; it seems like he just doesn't know any better, but he is still being punished. The last ghost is especially horrific, and I really felt for Scrooge.Fortunately he gets his second chance, and all's well that ends well :)more
A Christmas Carol is by far the most well written short story I have ever read. The last time I read this story I came away with a greater appreciation for Dickens' breathtaking skill as a writer. His use of words and phrases and the rhythm of his writing draws you in and the story itself keeps you there.Determined curmudgeon Ebeneezer Scrooge is literally spooked back into humanity after being visited by three Christmas ghosts. Through these uninvited supernatural guests Scrooge is forced into painful self-examination and is given a chilling warning of what will happen if he does not change his ways. Though set during the Christmas season, A Christmas Carol, carries lessons that are applicable for every day. From the first time I read it in my teens until today the overarching message I take away from the story is the importance of relationships in our lives. When we shut out others through selfishness or fear of being hurt we become impoverished regardless of what our bank statement says. A Christmas Carol is a story well worth coming back to any time of the year and is a good reminder of what really matters when we get too caught up in the stresses of the holiday season.more
A Christmas Carol is by far the most well written short story I have ever read. The last time I read this story I came away with a greater appreciation for Dickens' breathtaking skill as a writer. His use of words and phrases and the rhythm of his writing draws you in and the story itself keeps you there.Determined curmudgeon Ebeneezer Scrooge is literally spooked back into humanity after being visited by three Christmas ghosts. Through these uninvited supernatural guests Scrooge is forced into painful self-examination and is given a chilling warning of what will happen if he does not change his ways. Though set during the Christmas season, A Christmas Carol, carries lessons that are applicable for every day. From the first time I read it in my teens until today the overarching message I take away from the story is the importance of relationships in our lives. When we shut out others through selfishness or fear of being hurt we become impoverished regardless of what our bank statement says. A Christmas Carol is a story well worth coming back to any time of the year and is a good reminder of what really matters when we get too caught up in the stresses of the holiday season.more
A Christmas Carol is by far the most well written short story I have ever read. The last time I read this story I came away with a greater appreciation for Dickens' breathtaking skill as a writer. His use of words and phrases and the rhythm of his writing draws you in and the story itself keeps you there.Determined curmudgeon Ebeneezer Scrooge is literally spooked back into humanity after being visited by three Christmas ghosts. Through these uninvited supernatural guests Scrooge is forced into painful self-examination and is given a chilling warning of what will happen if he does not change his ways. Though set during the Christmas season, A Christmas Carol, carries lessons that are applicable for every day. From the first time I read it in my teens until today the overarching message I take away from the story is the importance of relationships in our lives. When we shut out others through selfishness or fear of being hurt we become impoverished regardless of what our bank statement says. A Christmas Carol is a story well worth coming back to any time of the year and is a good reminder of what really matters when we get too caught up in the stresses of the holiday season.more
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