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Generally considered to be F. Scott Fitzgerald's finest novel, The Great Gatsby is a consummate summary of the "roaring twenties", and a devastating expose of the "Jazz Age". Through the narration of Nick Carraway, the reader is taken into the superficially glittering world of the mansions which lined the Long Island shore in the 1920s, to encounter Nick's cousin Daisy, her brash but wealthy husband Tom Buchanan, Jay Gatsby and the mystery that surrounds him.

Published: Wordsworth Editions an imprint of Vearsa Limited on Oct 1, 2011
ISBN: 9781848703629
List price: $2.49
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This mini review is for the unabridged audiobook of "The Great Gatsby," read by Tim Robbins. (Please see the book proper for my full review of the novel.)I've listened to the audibook twice now, and actually enjoyed it more the second time. Certainly, Robbins is a good choice, permanently semi-associated with a pre-WWI narrative thanks to films like "The Cradle Will Rock." His narration is wonderful, but for the problem that Gatsby himself always sounds strangely affected; tacking "old sport" to the end of sentences reads naturally on the page, but doesn't sound quite right when you actually say it. A little too deliberate, or too many syllables - maybe both. Still, Robbins' voices do bring the story to life, and Fitzgerald's prose is as wonderfully evocative and as marvelously clean and simple as ever I once found it to be. In addition to the novel, the sixth disc includes almost an hour's-worth of Fitzgerald's letters, relating to the publication of "Gatsby," read by Robert Sean Leonard (who would also have been a fine choice to narrate the book). These make a nice accompaniment, placing the book in context and telling us some of Fitzgerald's own (unsurprisingly self-doubting) thoughts, and since I already know the book's story I find they actually make a great precursor to listening to discs 1 - 5.read more
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Okay, so everybody's read this already, but have you read it recently? I read it for the first time since high school and was blown away by how smart the book has gotten over the years. I can see why people reread and reread this book, and why it is so deservedly considered a masterpiece. A truly beautiful, wise book. -Coryread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not sure why this short novel is widely regarded as one of the great works of American literature, but it is certainly a book that etches itself in the memory. If Fitzgerald were a painter, the Gatsby characters would be not so much oil portraits as easily remembered caricatures deftly sketched on a restaurant table cloth or beer mat. The people in this story, set in the New York jazz age, are mostly either very wealthy or hopefully seeking out the company of the rich. There is symbiosis as the great Gatsby eases his loneliness by constantly filling his house with freeloading party guests. For me, much of the appeal of TGG lies in the narrative style. Events are recounted in the first person by Nick Carraway, a young, moderately well-off bachelor and himself a fortune hunter. He does not judge others but seems to learn from their vain, often self-destructive pursuit of mirages.TGG is a moral, perhaps Puritanical and certainly thought-provoking book, with a touch of melodrama in the sharp ironic twists of its conclusion. It is sometimes billed as a great love story, but it's really about human fantasies, delusions and false hopes.read more
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This mini review is for the unabridged audiobook of "The Great Gatsby," read by Tim Robbins. (Please see the book proper for my full review of the novel.)I've listened to the audibook twice now, and actually enjoyed it more the second time. Certainly, Robbins is a good choice, permanently semi-associated with a pre-WWI narrative thanks to films like "The Cradle Will Rock." His narration is wonderful, but for the problem that Gatsby himself always sounds strangely affected; tacking "old sport" to the end of sentences reads naturally on the page, but doesn't sound quite right when you actually say it. A little too deliberate, or too many syllables - maybe both. Still, Robbins' voices do bring the story to life, and Fitzgerald's prose is as wonderfully evocative and as marvelously clean and simple as ever I once found it to be. In addition to the novel, the sixth disc includes almost an hour's-worth of Fitzgerald's letters, relating to the publication of "Gatsby," read by Robert Sean Leonard (who would also have been a fine choice to narrate the book). These make a nice accompaniment, placing the book in context and telling us some of Fitzgerald's own (unsurprisingly self-doubting) thoughts, and since I already know the book's story I find they actually make a great precursor to listening to discs 1 - 5.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Okay, so everybody's read this already, but have you read it recently? I read it for the first time since high school and was blown away by how smart the book has gotten over the years. I can see why people reread and reread this book, and why it is so deservedly considered a masterpiece. A truly beautiful, wise book. -Cory
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not sure why this short novel is widely regarded as one of the great works of American literature, but it is certainly a book that etches itself in the memory. If Fitzgerald were a painter, the Gatsby characters would be not so much oil portraits as easily remembered caricatures deftly sketched on a restaurant table cloth or beer mat. The people in this story, set in the New York jazz age, are mostly either very wealthy or hopefully seeking out the company of the rich. There is symbiosis as the great Gatsby eases his loneliness by constantly filling his house with freeloading party guests. For me, much of the appeal of TGG lies in the narrative style. Events are recounted in the first person by Nick Carraway, a young, moderately well-off bachelor and himself a fortune hunter. He does not judge others but seems to learn from their vain, often self-destructive pursuit of mirages.TGG is a moral, perhaps Puritanical and certainly thought-provoking book, with a touch of melodrama in the sharp ironic twists of its conclusion. It is sometimes billed as a great love story, but it's really about human fantasies, delusions and false hopes.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jay Gatsby may not, in himself, be "great," but F. Scott Fitzgerald's prose is amazing, even more so through the narration of Tim Robbins, who changes characters, and voices, seamlessly. I last read Gatsby more than 40 years ago, when in high school. Reading it again, I wonder that it can be understood and appreciated by teenagers. My only criticism of the audiobook: Robbins can't quite manage the female voices, especially Daisy's. It would have been nice to have a female voice for the females.
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There is something in this book that is so poetic that it transcends the overall depression of the novel itself. "The Great Gatsby" is a rather ironic title. There isn't much great about Jay Gatsby, except his deep ambition and idealism, something that doesn't translate to the real world at all. He rose from small beginnings, and his entire life is ethereal, so superfluous and frenetic that it survives more as an abstraction of a life than a life itself. This life comes only out of love for a woman across the bay. It's narrated by Nick, his neighbor, who comes from the Midwest to the East, New York, to participate in the life there.It's a quick read, with expertly placed, just obvious enough symbols, metaphors and the like. It can be read as an allegory for the effects of money and capitalism, or as a snapshot of America at the time. The novel is crafted delicately, told like a story. It never gets so verbose as to prompt boredom, but makes the language savory. The characters are interesting and can be analyzed forever, never taking the mystery from them. It's a classic, perhaps the great American novel, I don't know (I still believe it's John Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath"). But I don't know how you could not like this novel. It's a brilliant story if nothing else.
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6/10.

A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's--and his country's--most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings.

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