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Introduction and Notes by Dr Ian Littlewood, University of Sussex.

Pride and Prejudice, which opens with one of the most famous sentences in English Literature, is an ironic novel of manners. In it the garrulous and empty-headed Mrs Bennet has only one aim - that of finding a good match for each of her five daughters. In this she is mocked by her cynical and indolent husband.

With its wit, its social precision and, above all, its irresistible heroine, Pride and Prejudice has proved one of the most enduringly popular novels in the English language.

Published: Wordsworth Editions an imprint of Vearsa Limited on Oct 1, 2011
ISBN: 9781848703742
List price: $2.49
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I've read all of Austen, and many think Mansfield Park is the best, but this is still my favorite. Witty, romantic, great plot and characters, all that a novel should be. Another one I re-read when I have run out of new stuff.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As said in class, Pride and Prejudices isn’t a novel on the study of one character like in Robinson Crusoe but is a novel which displays how characters interact with each other. The story is mainly based on how girls at this time had to find a husband to get a status in society. It was of course much better to get a wealthy husband. That's why the beginning of the book, Mr. Bingley’s arriving in town creates enthusiasm in the Benett's family and their five daughters. They will eventually all have to try to find someone to marry, pushed by their annoying mother, but won’t reach this goal easily. Later, all couples formed seems complex at first, the reader not exactly knowing which can link them. Pride, prejudices, first impressions, passion, morale, social statuses, actual feelings? Fortunately, along the reading, it’ll become clearer that each couple has its reasons to exist, consequences of earlier events. It’s globally very interesting to see how characters can stop or help each other through the main character, Elizabeth, who is like a guideline in this book. In Pride and Prejudices, Jane Austen manages to pass a message about a society focused on men but also manages, paradoxically, to make of her book a romantic novel with a happy end. An entertaining novel to read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was one of my favorite books well before the miniseries and film made that trendy. Maybe too trendy. It used to be my rather smug secret that a classic of the kind assigned in school was actually so fun--such a winning blend of romance and humor. And God, the awful professionally published fanfic that's popped up since the Austen films like Berdoll's cheesy novels--never mind Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. But the worse part of Austen's upsurge might be what Pride and Prejudice has become in the popular imagination, so that one of my friends doesn't want to read it because she has this idea of Darcy as the perfect romantic hero and that rather nauseates her.Yet in so many ways Pride and Prejudice is the opposite of so many romantic conventions as well as transcending it. It's at the opposite end of the temperamental spectrum from Wuthering Heights. Yes, this was written and set in the Regency era. Yes, there's a Cinderella quality to the tale given Darcy's wealth and the Bennets more modest circumstances. But what I love so much in this story is that it's far from love at first sight. Darcy is rude when we first meet him and earns every bit of disdain which Elizabeth originally feels for him. And his initial opinion of her? Not pretty enough to tempt him as a dance partner.The original title of the novel is famously First Impressions and the way this novel credibly develops the relationship between Darcy and Elizabeth from their initial mutual contempt is a marvel. It's why this is so much more than a love story--it's a novel about perceptions, assumptions and prejudices and how they can be reversed and in the process of which cause characters to grow. That's why I see Austen as the opposite of Emily Bronte--love as a force for and as the result of growth--not destruction.Beyond the central love story this novel has so many wonderfully memorable characters. I love the relationship between Elizabeth Bennet and her father; his own marriage makes an interesting foil for the other pairings in the novel. Mr Collins is a comic marvel--as is his "patroness" Lady Catherine de Bourgh. So much of the novel is laugh-out-laugh funny, so much of the dialogue memorable and quotable. One of those novels that can be read and read again and discussed and you keep finding new things in it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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I've read all of Austen, and many think Mansfield Park is the best, but this is still my favorite. Witty, romantic, great plot and characters, all that a novel should be. Another one I re-read when I have run out of new stuff.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As said in class, Pride and Prejudices isn’t a novel on the study of one character like in Robinson Crusoe but is a novel which displays how characters interact with each other. The story is mainly based on how girls at this time had to find a husband to get a status in society. It was of course much better to get a wealthy husband. That's why the beginning of the book, Mr. Bingley’s arriving in town creates enthusiasm in the Benett's family and their five daughters. They will eventually all have to try to find someone to marry, pushed by their annoying mother, but won’t reach this goal easily. Later, all couples formed seems complex at first, the reader not exactly knowing which can link them. Pride, prejudices, first impressions, passion, morale, social statuses, actual feelings? Fortunately, along the reading, it’ll become clearer that each couple has its reasons to exist, consequences of earlier events. It’s globally very interesting to see how characters can stop or help each other through the main character, Elizabeth, who is like a guideline in this book. In Pride and Prejudices, Jane Austen manages to pass a message about a society focused on men but also manages, paradoxically, to make of her book a romantic novel with a happy end. An entertaining novel to read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was one of my favorite books well before the miniseries and film made that trendy. Maybe too trendy. It used to be my rather smug secret that a classic of the kind assigned in school was actually so fun--such a winning blend of romance and humor. And God, the awful professionally published fanfic that's popped up since the Austen films like Berdoll's cheesy novels--never mind Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. But the worse part of Austen's upsurge might be what Pride and Prejudice has become in the popular imagination, so that one of my friends doesn't want to read it because she has this idea of Darcy as the perfect romantic hero and that rather nauseates her.Yet in so many ways Pride and Prejudice is the opposite of so many romantic conventions as well as transcending it. It's at the opposite end of the temperamental spectrum from Wuthering Heights. Yes, this was written and set in the Regency era. Yes, there's a Cinderella quality to the tale given Darcy's wealth and the Bennets more modest circumstances. But what I love so much in this story is that it's far from love at first sight. Darcy is rude when we first meet him and earns every bit of disdain which Elizabeth originally feels for him. And his initial opinion of her? Not pretty enough to tempt him as a dance partner.The original title of the novel is famously First Impressions and the way this novel credibly develops the relationship between Darcy and Elizabeth from their initial mutual contempt is a marvel. It's why this is so much more than a love story--it's a novel about perceptions, assumptions and prejudices and how they can be reversed and in the process of which cause characters to grow. That's why I see Austen as the opposite of Emily Bronte--love as a force for and as the result of growth--not destruction.Beyond the central love story this novel has so many wonderfully memorable characters. I love the relationship between Elizabeth Bennet and her father; his own marriage makes an interesting foil for the other pairings in the novel. Mr Collins is a comic marvel--as is his "patroness" Lady Catherine de Bourgh. So much of the novel is laugh-out-laugh funny, so much of the dialogue memorable and quotable. One of those novels that can be read and read again and discussed and you keep finding new things in it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Bennett's have five unmarried daughters—from oldest to youngest, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty, and Lydia—and Mrs. Bennett is desperate to see them all married. When the news that a wealthy bachelor Charles Bingley has rented the manor of Netherfield Park, Mrs. Bennett begins scheming to marry one of her daughters to him. At a ball that the Mr. Bingley and the Bennett girls attend we are introduced to Mr. Bingley’s friend Mr. Darcy. Mr. Bingley is quite taken with Jane, and Mr. Darcy is quite untaken with Elizabeth. Over the weeks as he interacts more with Elizabeth this begins to change. There is a mysterious fiancé and hurt feelings, but in the end Jane and Mr. Darcy reconcile and marry. This is classic Austin, I know that she has many fans and I know that when she was writing she lived in a different era for women, but I am just not able to reconcile the facts with me feelings. Being a on a constant husband hunt bores me, and yes Jane does assert some independence, but she is still a husband hunter who fears being a spinster school teacher. At least she isn’t willing to settle for the first bloke that asks or she would have been unhappily married to Mr. Collins, so there were some indicators of a strong woman. I think this is one of the reasons I can’t classic literature, I always want the heroine to say the hell with it and decide not to succumb to society and run off and become a successful businesswoman who never marries, even though I know it will never happen. Overall, though once my irrational suffrage rights feelings are set aside, it wasn’t a bad book. Little long winded in some spots, but that is the genre. Austen is a classic because she is a good writer and she tells a good tale. Overall I would say it was a 3 star read.
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This is a brilliant introduction into classical literature, thanks to its non-fussy, humourous style. It lacks the heavy description of other classical authors. The story hasn't aged at all.
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Austen's best-known book stands up well to a second readin.. The story of five sisters in search of husbands, accompanied by plenty of social criticism, satire, and fun is enjoyable for anyone who doesn't need a rapid-fire page-turner. Most people know the main plot, about the proud young man and the young woman who conceives of a prejudice against him, so I'll not retell it here. What's made this book popular for two hundred years is, I think, the humor, the gentle skewering of social attitudes, and the constant misperceptions of the motives of others. It's sort of classic lit. lite, easily accessible to almost all readers. Highly recommended.
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