• book
    0% of Capital completed

From the Publisher

Few writers have had a more demonstrable impact on the development of  the modern world than has Karl Marx (1818-1883). Born in Trier into a  middle-class Jewish family in 1818, by the time of his death in London  in 1883, Marx claimed a growing international reputation.



Of central importance then and later was his book Das Kapital, or, as it is known to English readers, simply Capital. Volume One of Capital  was published in Paris in 1867 and is included in this edition. This  was the only volume published during Marx’s lifetime and the only to  have come directly from his pen. Volume Two, available as a separate  Wordsworth eBook, was published in 1884, and was based on notes Marx  left, but written by his friend and collaborator, Friedrich Engels  (1820-1895).



Readers from the nineteenth century to the present have been captivated  by the unmistakable power and urgency of this classic of world  literature. Marx’s critique of the capitalist system is rife with big  themes: his theory of ‘surplus value’, his discussion of the  exploitation of the working class, and his forecast of class conflict on  a grand scale. Marx wrote with purpose. As he famously put it,  ‘Philosophers have previously tried to explain the world, our task is to  change it.’

Published: Wordsworth Editions on
ISBN: 9781848705609
List price: $4.49
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Capital: Volume One
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

NPR
2 min read
Politics

German City Accepts Karl Marx Statue From China, But Not Everyone's Happy

The German city of Trier has never been particularly fond of its most famous son, Karl Marx, who helped turn communism into an ideology that changed the course of history. Conservative and Catholic, the picturesque city on the French border took an ambivalent view of the radical revolutionary, born into a Jewish family in 1818. But now, as Trier prepares for the bicentennial of Marx's birth, the city plans to put up a monument to the bushy-bearded thinker. Last week, Trier's city council overwhelmingly voted to accept a 20-foot bronze statue of Marx as a gift from China — which, at least in na
Aeon Magazine
5 min read
Psychology

The Tree Of Knowledge Is Not An Apple Or An Oak But A Banyan

In European societies, knowledge is often pictured as a tree: a single trunk – the core – with branches splaying outwards towards distant peripheries. The imagery of this tree is so deeply embedded in European thought-patterns that every form of institution has been marshalled into a ‘centre-periphery’ pattern. In philosophy, for example, there are certain ‘core’ subjects and other more marginal, peripheral, and implicitly expendable, ones. Likewise, a persistent, and demonstrably false, picture of science has it as consisting of a ‘stem’ of pure science (namely fundamental physics) with secon
Nautilus
4 min read
Religion & Spirituality

A Treatise on Miracles by History’s Most Famous Atheist: Are some things too good to be true?

The Scottish philosopher David Hume was in many ways an enemy of the unlikely. The quintessential empiricist of his age, Hume’s 1748 treatise, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, put forward the groundbreaking argument that careful reasoning on the basis of sensory experience is the only true ground of knowledge. In doing so, he called into question the validity of many improbable claims advanced in religious texts, folklore, and historical accounts of times past and lands far away. In this short excerpt from a section of the treatise, titled “Of Miracles,” Hume proffers what he takes t