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According to Wikipedia: "Thomas de Quincey (15 August 1785 – 8 December 1859) was an English author and intellectual, best known for his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821). ... His immediate influence extended to Edgar Allan Poe, Fitz Hugh Ludlow, Charles Baudelaire, and Nikolai Gogol, but even major 20th century writers such as Jorge Luis Borges admired and claimed to be partly influenced by his work. Berlioz also loosely based his Symphonie Fantastique on Confessions of an English Opium Eater, drawing on the theme of the internal struggle with one's self. De Quincey is also referred to in the Sherlock Holmes short story The Man with the Twisted Lip."
Published: B&R Samizdat Express on
ISBN: 9781455340941
List price: $0.99
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Availability for Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
    A good attempt to write an honest account of what it is like to live as a Male Lifelong Opium Eater; that is in drops of Red Poison Tincture gotten from the Chemist, whose first use was to relieve the pain of toothache.
    Da Quincey is less inclined to open his heart as to the negative effects of Opium which he defends to the end and even tries to take himself off it- a difficult exercise which leads to much suffering which he details in his book.
    The Author is nomadic, homeless (what you would get today), independent, suffering the full effect of uninhibited memory release as a result of the Opium.
    When he tries to come off it as if Memories buried beneath the fog of the drug come to the surface.
    A very interesting book and one of many I am reading into the lives of those who are addicted.more
    Back in the 19th century Erowid trip reports featured a lot more orientalism and bragging about how much Ancient Greek you knew but were otherwise essentially as we know them now.more
    i found this book to be very dry and difficult to get throughmore
    Most likely my favorite autobiographical essay, for many reasons, but ultimately not because Quincey delicately describes the persuasions of a most desirable experience I have found myself in but more because he sets the scene for a man who would want to feel "agitated, writhing, throbbing, palpitating, shattered" in the mental faculties that were only heightened by his usage of the drug, at the time one that was not proper to write about. I’m not sure if the group Death in June named themselves after the following passage but I shall quote:June, 1819.I have had occasion to remark, at various periods of my life, that the deaths of those whom we love, and indeed the contemplation of death generally, is (caeteris paribus) [‘other things being equal’], more effecting in summer than in any other season of the year. De Quincey's explanation of why this is the case is phenomenal, but the album "But, What Ends When the Symbols Shatter?" suffices to aurally describe his words.more
    This is the autobiography of Thomas de Quincey, a 19th century intellectual who indulged in opium use for a large proportion of his life. The book only gets onto the opium after half way through, and spends a while detailing his childhood and younger years. Smaller sections toward the end give account of the pleasures and pains of opium, and are just as interesting to read as the earlier parts. What is distinctive of this book is the apparent candor with which the author writes, the details of his thoughts and feelings through the various times in his life, and his observations on human nature. This is as much a view onto life in the period as it is a view onto the life of Quincey, and as it also contains his views of literary contemporaries, it should be of interest to fans of literature of this time.more
    Read all 8 reviews

    Reviews

    A good attempt to write an honest account of what it is like to live as a Male Lifelong Opium Eater; that is in drops of Red Poison Tincture gotten from the Chemist, whose first use was to relieve the pain of toothache.
    Da Quincey is less inclined to open his heart as to the negative effects of Opium which he defends to the end and even tries to take himself off it- a difficult exercise which leads to much suffering which he details in his book.
    The Author is nomadic, homeless (what you would get today), independent, suffering the full effect of uninhibited memory release as a result of the Opium.
    When he tries to come off it as if Memories buried beneath the fog of the drug come to the surface.
    A very interesting book and one of many I am reading into the lives of those who are addicted.more
    Back in the 19th century Erowid trip reports featured a lot more orientalism and bragging about how much Ancient Greek you knew but were otherwise essentially as we know them now.more
    i found this book to be very dry and difficult to get throughmore
    Most likely my favorite autobiographical essay, for many reasons, but ultimately not because Quincey delicately describes the persuasions of a most desirable experience I have found myself in but more because he sets the scene for a man who would want to feel "agitated, writhing, throbbing, palpitating, shattered" in the mental faculties that were only heightened by his usage of the drug, at the time one that was not proper to write about. I’m not sure if the group Death in June named themselves after the following passage but I shall quote:June, 1819.I have had occasion to remark, at various periods of my life, that the deaths of those whom we love, and indeed the contemplation of death generally, is (caeteris paribus) [‘other things being equal’], more effecting in summer than in any other season of the year. De Quincey's explanation of why this is the case is phenomenal, but the album "But, What Ends When the Symbols Shatter?" suffices to aurally describe his words.more
    This is the autobiography of Thomas de Quincey, a 19th century intellectual who indulged in opium use for a large proportion of his life. The book only gets onto the opium after half way through, and spends a while detailing his childhood and younger years. Smaller sections toward the end give account of the pleasures and pains of opium, and are just as interesting to read as the earlier parts. What is distinctive of this book is the apparent candor with which the author writes, the details of his thoughts and feelings through the various times in his life, and his observations on human nature. This is as much a view onto life in the period as it is a view onto the life of Quincey, and as it also contains his views of literary contemporaries, it should be of interest to fans of literature of this time.more
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