Pick a Game! by Tom Wright and Ethan Daum - Read Online
Pick a Game!
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Summary

Pick a Game! is a reference of various voting systems Ethan and Tom have used over the years.

Instead of calm discussion, you can now choose which game you want to play with a complicated voting system.

These voting systems are primarily used to choose board games.

Published: Moonlight Crew Publishing on
ISBN: 9781501487736
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Pick a Game! - Tom Wright

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Quick note:

This book is free. If you paid for this book, refund it immediately and e–mail Tom at tomwright@moonlightcrew.com to get a free copy.

Intro

How many times has this happened to you?

You: So, what game do you want to play?

Friend #1: I don’t care.

Friend #2: Me neither.

Friend #3: I’m down for whatever.

You: Awesome, let’s do Puerto Rico.

Friend #1: Ugh, it’s too long.

You: How about San Juan?

Friend #2: Still too Euro.

You: Then what do you want to play?

Friend #1 and #2: Whatever else.

You: Hmm. Munchkin?

Friend #3: No. I don’t want to sit at level 9 for an hour, getting beat up by all of you.

You: Thurn and Taxis?

Friend #2: Nah, still pretty Euro.

You: Sentinels of the Multiverse?

Friend #1: Now you’re talking.

Friend #2: No meaningful choices. Co–ops are great, but I want something better.

You: Legends of Andor?

Friend #1: Ugh, serious case of game plays you.

You: So, do any of you have any suggestions?

Friend #1: No, I don’t care what we play.

Friend #2: Me neither.

Friend #3: I’m down for whatever.

(repeat for the next half hour)

If this hasn’t happened to you, sounds like you’re a strictly solo–gamer. Picking a game to play is like getting a group of ten people to agree on a restaurant during lunch. The more people you add, the tougher it’s going to be.

In Ethan’s and my (Tom) game group, picking a game to play does not allow for calm discussion. Instead, choices should be made cloak and dagger style. With that reasoning, our group decided on complicated voting systems, which are changed every two months.

You can treat this book like a reference book, choosing the system that sounds best to you. Maybe you roll