• book
    0% of What to Read After FSOG completed

From the Publisher

What to Read After Fifty Shades of Grey (#WTRAFSOG) began as a Facebook page created by Summer Daniels dedicated to helping book lovers discover great reads after FSoG. Over time, the page grew in popularity and spawned a website that listed the top 50 books and authors recommended and purchased by book lovers the world over. The WTRAFSOG Facebook page has now grown to over 90,000 followers!

This collection features incredible books from the top of the WTRAFSOG chart. Each book is unique and has a theme of its own, from sweet to sinister, and everywhere in between.

Shades of Pearl by Arianne Richmonde -- USA TODAY Bestselling novel. Just when Pearl has given up on love, sexy French billionaire Alexandre sweeps her off her feet with passion and intrigue. The catch? He's fifteen years younger than she is. Ride this roller coaster of sex, lies, heartache and love.

Double Occupancy by Elaine Raco Chase -- Meet Casey Reynolds - she's not thin, petite, clueless, virginal or submissive - but she is a burned out Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter who ends up reluctantly sharing a borrowed villa with a handsome stranger. Provocative, explicit but so much fun!

Floor Time by Liz Crowe -- Jack and Sara bring the SEXY to real estate. Two successful, independent and complex adults with plenty of baggage have a single clichéd hookup that changes their worlds forever. Expect to get hooked on this compelling couple and their series.

Break Me Slowly by Joya Ryan -- Adam Kinkade is a man used to getting what he wants. And he wants Katelyn--naked and often. Willing to stop at nothing to possess her, he relentlessly pursues Kate only to discover that it is she who possesses him--completely.

Deadly Obsession by Kristine Cayne -- When movie-star Nic Lamoureux meets photographer Lauren James, the attraction is instant--and mutual, but his stalker makes it deadly clear Lauren is the competition. And the competition must be eliminated.

Captive in the Dark by CJ Roberts --This New York Times Bestseller is the story of a young woman kidnapped and held hostage by a human trafficker out for revenge. Gritty, violent, and not for the faint of heart. 18+

(love story, contemporary romance, new adult romance, alpha heroes, beach reads, sexy romance, bad boys, falling in love, millionaire, romantic suspense, domination, submission)

Published: WTRAFSOG on
ISBN: 9781502225559
List price: $0.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for What to Read After FSOG: The Gemstone Collection (WTRAFSO...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

TIME
2 min read

When Less Plot Is Actually More

AFTER WRITING SEVEN NOVELS AND three works of nonfiction, acclaimed British author Rachel Cusk began to find fiction “fake and embarrassing.” Two years ago, she explained to a British newspaper, “Once you have suffered sufficiently, the idea of making up John and Jane and having them do things together seems utterly ridiculous.” No surprise, then, that her 2014 novel Outline was anything but plot-driven. It was more like a series of observations by a narrator as she traveled to Greece to teach writing. The people she met along the way essentially became the subjects of miniature profiles craf
New York Magazine
2 min read

Our Book Critic’s 5 Most Anticipated

AGAINST EVERYTHING: ESSAYS SEPT. 6, BY MARK GREIF Following on the heels of last year’s ambitious, if somewhat clunkily titled The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973, Grief’s new book collects more than a decade’s worth of provocations from a founder of n+1. In it, he traces the arc of a young intellectual through the Bush and Obama administrations, from the gym to the ramparts. SUBSTITUTE: GOING TO SCHOOL WITH A THOUSAND KIDS SEPT. 6, BY NICHOLSON BAKER Baker is an obsessive with immense powers of observation, a strong social conscience, and, as those fam
The Atlantic
8 min read
Psychology

The Best Writing Advice of 2016

2016 was not an easy year to be a writer. Not just because of the constant, concentration-wrecking pull of our devices, their glowing screens beckoning with the promise of fresh horrors. I’ve spoken with many writers, in recent months, who seem to be facing a deeper, starker crisis of purpose since the election of Donald Trump. They’re asking themselves: Is making literature an acceptable pursuit in a world with such urgent, tangible needs? And if so, how should I use my words? It’s a deeply personal line of questioning, and I can’t supply any answers here—I’m still working things out for myse