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ratings:
4/5 (132 ratings)
Length:
19 pages
3 minutes
Released:
Oct 21, 2011
ISBN:
9781452103754
Format:
Book

Description

From the creators of Little Pea and Little Hoot comes this tidy tale of a decidedly different pig. Little Oink is a neat little fellow. Clean, clean, clean, that's all he wants to do. But Mama and Papa won't have it! They say in order to be a proper pig, he has to learn to make a proper mess. "Don't come out until your room is a pigsty," says Papa Pig. "I won't have any child of mine going out looking so neat and clean. It's just not acceptable," says Mama Pig. Readers who hate to clean up will love this humorous twist on a universal dilemma.
Released:
Oct 21, 2011
ISBN:
9781452103754
Format:
Book

About the author

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is the bestselling author of Little Pea, Little Oink, Duck! Rabbit!, Spoon, Cookies: Bite Size Life Lessons as well as Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life for adults. She is the creator of a performance art movie called "The Beckoning of Lovely" in which lots of strangers do things together (see www.thebeckoningoflovely.wordpress.com), is a frequent contributor on NPR, notably "Writers Block Party" on Chicago Public Radio, and is at work on many other books. See also Amy's website at www.whoisamy.wordpress.com. Amy lives with her family in Chicago, IL.

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Little Oink - Amy Krouse Rosenthal

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Reviews

What people think about Little Oink

4.0
132 ratings / 9 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Following upon their immensely successful Little Pea and Little Hoot, Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Jen Corace once again deliver a tale of a youngster whose experience is the inversion of some common childhood problem, whether it be the disinclination to eat vegetables, or a reluctance to go to bed. In Little Oink, the eponymous hero likes nothing so much as to be clean, but his parents insist that all good pigs must make a mess, and will not permit him to go out and play, until his room is looking like a pigsty...I enjoyed this clever play on the classic parent-child conflict concerning the necessity of cleaning one's room, and thought Corace's ink and watercolor illustrations were charming. Little details, like Mama Pig's vintage glasses, added to the sense of visual whimsy. But while I think Little Oink will probably be a crowd-pleaser, particularly with young children who don't like to clean their rooms, somehow I didn't think it quite the equal of Little Pea. Whether this is owing to some difference in quality between the two, or merely to the fact that the novelty of concept has worn off, I couldn't really say. Still, this was an enjoyable picture-book, well worth the time of anyone who reads to (and with) toddlers.
  • (5/5)
    "Little Oink" is a story all about irony. The irony that there is a pig that wants everything to be clean, when his family insists that everything be messy! This bring humor to the idea of what a pig is stereotyped like, as well as represents that sometimes you have to do things that you do not want to! This story does it in a humorous way, but points out that the pig does not want to make his room a mess, but he has to listen to his parents. The illustrations fit the text great and make the story even more humorous.
  • (4/5)
    Rosenthal, A.K. (2009). Little Oink. San Francisco: Chronicle Books.9780811866552Appetizer: Little Oink is a happy little pig, but there's one part of his day that he doesn't like. He hates having to make a mess. While all the other animals spend a portion of their day cleaning, Oink wishes to join them.Rosenthal has an amazing ability to play with expectation and perspective. In this picturebook, making a mess is not fun and cleaning is. What more could a preschool teacher/babysitter/parent want to share with kids?*Spoiler for the ending* I especially liked that Little Oink if finally able to clean as he likes when he plays house. Not only does it show that Oink can still realize his dream, but also, it challenges the gender stereotype that the girl is supposed to be the one to clean. Yayz! Challenge away, Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Challenge away!Dinner Conversation:"And now comes the story of Little Oink.Little Oink was a neat little pig. He liked a lot of things.""But there was one thing Little Oink did not like: Mess up time. Because that's what you have to do when you're a pig.""All my friends get to clean their rooms. Why can't I? asked Little Oink?"To Go with the Meal:A fun read aloud, I'd probably share this book from time to time at the end of the day when it comes time to clean the classroom before going home.Another option is to use this at home. When Little Oink goes through the process of un-cleaning his room (unmaking his bed, unfolding clothes, throwing his towel on the floor, etc.), a young reader can clean all the places and things Little Oink can only dream of cleaning.There is also a page where Little Oink must take his toys out of his toy box. The page counts all of his toys, but does so out of order. A teacher could discuss how numbers can be spelled out (ten instead of 10) and have a wee little child count the toys for themselves.Tasty Rating: !!!!
  • (3/5)
    Ok people, take Little Hoot, replace him with a pig (appropriately named Little Oink), mix in pig stereotypes and viola - you have Little Oink. Another Every Kid character who likes to play with his friends and enjoys school. With the exception that Little Oink is very tidy, so of course the "one thing that Little Oink did not like" was mess up time. That's right, you heard me, it's time to make a mess!"All my friends get to clean their rooms. Why can't I?" asked Little Oink.His parents point out that he's a pig and pigs make messes. Since his parents love him and want him to grow up to be a respectable pig he must "learn how to make a proper mess.""Mess up your room, put on some dirty clothes,and then you can go out and play," said Mama Pig."Do I have to?" Little Oink snorted."Yes, you have to," they retorted.We then watch as Little Oink empties his drawers, unmakes his bed, and even drags mud into his room. He asks his parents if he can go out and play, but they tell him that the room isn't a total pigsty just yet. So he throws his toys out of the toy box (you guessed it, more counting), and is finally allowed to go out and play is favorite game - house.Yes, this is a Little Hoot clone, but the illustrations are fun and there is more word play. On a page that pictures Little Oink digging, the text reads he "dug playing with his pig pals." The picture of him at school while eating lunch - "He savored his days at school". This continues throughout the book. Yes, a lot of this is going to go over your child's head, but it's a fun touch. I did like the page where Little Oink imagines his friends getting to clean up their rooms: his bird friend arranges leaves and a mouse pushes a bar of soap bigger than he is. There's a lot on this page that your child can look at and talk about. The parents are spectacularly messy and children find it funny. Watching Little Oink play house and tidy up his tree house is cute but even the kids find the final line a bit much:And they all lived hap-pig-ly ever afterVerdict:Not my favorite of the three, the only reason I own it is because I bought a box set. That being said, there is a lot in the illustrations for children to enjoy and being able to make predictions based on patterns and past experience is an important reading skill. Younger kids will miss out on some of the corny word play - it's a great way to build vocabulary, but you will spend time explaining things. There is a lot less white space in this book, and I find that I miss it. I have the board book and the pages are packed with stuff, but the normal hardback doesn't feel as crowded. I give it three stars, it's ok, but Little Pea and Little Hoot are better.
  • (5/5)
    Here is the story if Little Oink, a little diligent pig who loves to be tidy and clean, but when mess up time - as his parents order - arrives, problems ensue. He just wants to be like the other kids, while his parents demand the opposite of him.
    So he diligently turns his spaces into a pigsty.
    When his "job" is done, he can finally go play outside. There he takes care of a perfectly clean tree house.
    A happy ending for the whole family.

    Amazon recommends this book for 5-6-year olds, but I would suggest an older audience. Reading about parents ordering their kid to make a mess is fun, but not educational, and the book might be misunderstood.
  • (5/5)
    1: the little pig just tidy up 3 things 2: he is very cute
  • (1/5)
    Nice ?? book ? but I feel like to vomiting ? get out of the way you geese
  • (5/5)
    "Little Oink" takes the age-old whine of "DO I HAVE TO CLEAN UP MY ROOM?!" and turns it on its (pig) ear. Little Oink wants to be clean, but every night he has to make his room a pigsty! What an awesome twist. And the storytelling is top-notch: simple and playful but never preachy. The illustrations are delightful and perfectly compliment the story in their simplicity. 5 stars.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    If you are looking for the silliest and most ironic books for children, look no more and read Amy Krouse-Rosenthal's books. This is another story where things and do not happen in a normal way. Little oink is about the only pig who likes to be clean and organized. He spends time cleaning up his room and being neat, however, this causes him to get in trouble with his father. He is sent to mess up his room and put on dirty clothes in order to become the respectable pig he should be, just like his dad.The story is very entertaining and can be used as an interactive read-aloud in the classroom.

    1 person found this helpful