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Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

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Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

ratings:
4/5 (14 ratings)
Length:
38 pages
7 minutes
Released:
Sep 7, 2012
ISBN:
9781452119847
Format:
Book

Description

The bold, bright colors of India leap right off the page in this fresh and funny picture book adaptation of how Ganesha came to write the epic poem of Hindu literature, the Mahabharata.

Ganesha is just like any other kid, except that he has the head of an elephant and rides around on a magical mouse. And he loves sweets, especially the traditional dessert laddoo. But when Ganesha insists on biting into a super jumbo jawbreaker laddoo, his tusk breaks off! Ganesha is terribly upset, but with the help of the wise poet Vyasa, he learns that what seems broken can actually be quite useful after all. With vibrant, graphic illustrations, expressive characters, and offbeat humor, this is a wonderfully inventive twist on a classic tale.
Released:
Sep 7, 2012
ISBN:
9781452119847
Format:
Book

About the author

Emily Haynes is an editor by day, specializing in entertainment and humor titles, and a children's writer by night. In her spare time she can often be found up to her elbows in clay, making functional ceramics. This is her first children's book. She lives in Oakland, California.


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Reviews

What people think about Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

4.1
14 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    I really enjoyed, “Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth” for many reasons. First, I really like how the authors of this book elaborated on the real life Hindu legend of the elephant god Ganesha. They made a very sacred story in the Hindu culture tangible to people like me, who don’t know anything about it. Even though, “Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth” is only loosely based on the classic legend, it is still a very entertaining book that made me more curious about Hindu mythology. Secondly, I really like how the illustrations in the book depict India. With all the many colors and vivid details depicting the god Ganesha and the poet Vyasa, both real characters in Hindi mythology, I felt as though India was leaping off of the pages. Lastly, I really enjoyed the story itself. Ganesha is a god who loves laddoo’s (candy) and comes across, “the super jumbo jawbreaker laddoo.” Right as he is about to bite into it his friend, Mr. Mouse, warns him not to eat it because it will break his tusk. Ganesha replies to him by saying, “But I’m a god, I’m invincible” and proceeds to bite into the jawbreaker and break his tusk. Ganesha tries every way possible to put his tusk back on, but nothing works, so he throws his tusk at the moon. However, his tusk doesn’t hit the moon but the head of an old man walking by. The old man introduces himself to Ganesha as the poet Vyasa and tells the elephant he has been searching for him. Vyasa also tells Ganesha that he needs a special scribe for a very long poem he is writing because all other pens in the world would break before it was done. Ganesha and Vyasa strike up a deal for Ganesha to be his scribe. Vyasa has to tell the story in one sitting and Ganesha cannot stop writing. However, this can only be possible if Ganesha understands the meaning of everything Vyasa says, so he has to pay very close attention. Ganesha agrees to be the special scribe for Vyasa and uses his broken tusk as his pen. They work together and eventually produce the great epic of Hindu literature, the Mahabharata. The central meaning of, “Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth” is collaboration and humility. In the beginning of the story Ganesha does not listen to Mr. Mouse and as a result breaks his tusk. Ganesha is a very prideful elephant who believes that just because he is a god, nothing bad can happen to him. This of course is not true and conveys the message to readers that no matter how great you think you are, you are always capable of making mistakes. Secondly, “Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth” teaches the importance of people working together, because collaboration produces great things. The Mahabharata could not have been written if Ganesha did not have his tusk and Vyasa did not have his story. Their collaboration made the Hindu classic possible. This is the same in life. Sometimes, it takes more than one set of hands to make something great happen, and that is okay.
  • (5/5)
    This is a delightful picture book combining several different versions of how Ganesh broke his tusk. It also introduces the Mahabharata in a very cursory manner. Patel's illustrations are a delight and will provide an interested reader with much to augment the story line.
  • (5/5)
    An interesting twist on the story of how Ganesha broke his tusk to write the Mahabharata. It's sweet and funny and the colors are spectacular. Sanjay Patel is a pixar artist and you can definitely see it. The colors are vibrant and the illustrations add to the humor and sweetness of the story.
  • (4/5)
    A fun, playful take on the Hindu myth with delightfully vibrant illustrations.
  • (5/5)
    Its so sweet. I loved the twist to the laddie...The Jawbreaker Laddoo. Its a fun and simple introduction to the most loved Hindu God.