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Already haunted by a youth of illegitimacy and poverty, Valente Lorenzatto never forgave Caroline Hales's abandonment of him at the altar.

But now he's made millions and claimed his aristocratic Venetian birthright—and he's poised to get his revenge. He'll ruin Caroline's family by buying out their company and throwing them out of their mansion…unless she agrees to give him the wedding night she denied him five years ago….

Topics: Revenge, Blackmail, Sexy Millionaires, Widows, and Romantic

Published: Harlequin Presents an imprint of Harlequin on
ISBN: 9781426854996
List price: $3.99
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Jesus not so good at all and I would have ditch her parents. The way they behave it was very bad and she accepting to marry a guy to make the parents happy in this day and age. Please,

BADDDmore
Okay, I'll admit it - "trashy romance novels" are my guilty pleasure sometimes, and you can't get much trashier than the Harlequin Presents line. The men are usually swarthy, rich, and impossibly arrogant; and the women are usually virgin socialites who are just waiting around to marry the right guy. Yeah, okay, not great literature, but I never said that they were.This offering was just okay. Valente was a suitable hero for the Presents line, but the heroine was really just a doormat (which is also typical for this line, but even more so). If this had been "real," I'd be counseling her to grow a backbone and leave the toxic relationship. However, the story was mostly promising until about halfway through, when the author started introducing all of these other little plot points that really didn't need to be included - the "true reason" why the heroine ditched Valente at the altar, Agnese's (one of Valente's former mistresses) abrupt re-entrance into Valente's life (which really felt more like filler than a genuine plot point), etc. Furthermore, the end is just far too tidily wrapped for my tastes. Sure, this is a romance novel, and I expect everything to end "happily ever after," but Valente went from telling Caroline that he didn't love her and never would to declaring his endless love for her in just a chapter - really just a few pages! - and revealing that everything had been an elaborate plan to "trap" her so she'd not be able to leave him again. Umm, what? That felt super rushed. If the author had really focused on just one main plot instead of diverting along the path several times over, then I think this romance would have been a better read. Instead, it felt like the author crammed too many cliches into the story towards the end, and then realized that she had to end things happily and only had a few pages to do so. Lynne Graham tends to be a hit-or-miss author; she's written some great romances, but this isn't one of them.more

Reviews

Jesus not so good at all and I would have ditch her parents. The way they behave it was very bad and she accepting to marry a guy to make the parents happy in this day and age. Please,

BADDDmore
Okay, I'll admit it - "trashy romance novels" are my guilty pleasure sometimes, and you can't get much trashier than the Harlequin Presents line. The men are usually swarthy, rich, and impossibly arrogant; and the women are usually virgin socialites who are just waiting around to marry the right guy. Yeah, okay, not great literature, but I never said that they were.This offering was just okay. Valente was a suitable hero for the Presents line, but the heroine was really just a doormat (which is also typical for this line, but even more so). If this had been "real," I'd be counseling her to grow a backbone and leave the toxic relationship. However, the story was mostly promising until about halfway through, when the author started introducing all of these other little plot points that really didn't need to be included - the "true reason" why the heroine ditched Valente at the altar, Agnese's (one of Valente's former mistresses) abrupt re-entrance into Valente's life (which really felt more like filler than a genuine plot point), etc. Furthermore, the end is just far too tidily wrapped for my tastes. Sure, this is a romance novel, and I expect everything to end "happily ever after," but Valente went from telling Caroline that he didn't love her and never would to declaring his endless love for her in just a chapter - really just a few pages! - and revealing that everything had been an elaborate plan to "trap" her so she'd not be able to leave him again. Umm, what? That felt super rushed. If the author had really focused on just one main plot instead of diverting along the path several times over, then I think this romance would have been a better read. Instead, it felt like the author crammed too many cliches into the story towards the end, and then realized that she had to end things happily and only had a few pages to do so. Lynne Graham tends to be a hit-or-miss author; she's written some great romances, but this isn't one of them.more
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