• book

From the Publisher

Wolfe has been looking for Rowan Corbett for five long years. She is the only one who knows the truth about his brother's death.

But the woman he encounters is not the temptress he expected. In fact, Wolfe can hardly resist the lure of Rowan's innocence....

Topics: Secrets, Lust, New Zealand, Suspenseful, and Romantic

Published: Harlequin Presents an imprint of Harlequin on
ISBN: 9781426859229
List price: $2.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Wolfe's Temptress
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

TIME
1 min read

Crimes of the Heart

S.B. Like many of his novels, Spanish author Javier Marías’ new book, Thus Bad Begins, isn’t exactly a mystery, though it is mysterious. Here, the 65-year-old perennial Nobel favorite tells the story of Juan de Vere, a young man working for a film director, Eduardo Muriel. The older man assigns his apprentice the task of finding out a secret about a longtime friend. Meanwhile, de Vere is intrigued by the cold relationship between Muriel and his depressed wife Beatriz—at some point in their past, she did something unforgivable, also a secret, and de Vere wants to find out what. Marías (The In
TIME
2 min read

Four Roads Diverge in a Wood

SARAH BEGLEY CERTAIN BOOKS LEAVE READERS FEELING THEY KNOW EVERY MINUTE detail of a character’s inner life, as if they were lifelong companions and daily confidants. Paul Auster’s massive new novel, 4 3 2 1, is such a book. The concept behind the 866-page tome boils down to one life, lived four ways. By the end of the first chapter a boy named Archie Ferguson has been born to a New Jersey couple in 1947. Subsequent chapters cycle through four versions of how his life plays out: he grows up in different New Jersey towns, attends different schools and embarks on different adventures and misadv
The Atlantic
8 min read
Psychology

The Best Writing Advice of 2016

2016 was not an easy year to be a writer. Not just because of the constant, concentration-wrecking pull of our devices, their glowing screens beckoning with the promise of fresh horrors. I’ve spoken with many writers, in recent months, who seem to be facing a deeper, starker crisis of purpose since the election of Donald Trump. They’re asking themselves: Is making literature an acceptable pursuit in a world with such urgent, tangible needs? And if so, how should I use my words? It’s a deeply personal line of questioning, and I can’t supply any answers here—I’m still working things out for myse