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The Sun My Heart is one of Thich Nhat Hanh’s most beloved books. Using the objects and events of everyday life in his hermitage in Plum Village the gradual settling of the pulp in a glass of apple juice or the wind blowing into the room and scattering papers about Thich Nhat Hanh draws from Buddhist psychology, epistemology, and the world of contemporary literature and science to guide the reader along the path of clarity and understanding. This book can be read straight through, but is also designed to be opened randomly and experienced chapter by chapter, paragraph by paragraph. Nhat Hanh suggests that the book prefers to be a friend rather than a book. You can take it with you on the bus or subway as you do your coat or your scarf. It can give you small moments of joy at any time.”
Published: Parallax Press on Feb 2, 2010
ISBN: 9781937006044
List price: $9.99
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I was somewhat disappointed in this book, since I was expecting something along the lines of previous little books by this author on mindfulness. This book proved different, though of course the subjects of mindfulness, breathing exercises and so on do come up. I suppose one could say that the topic of this book is the same as that of the others, this book just goes deeper (infinitely deeper).This book shows a highly intellectual, philosophical side of the author: He teaches us that mind and object are one, that "one is all, all is one". He thus discusses the interdependence of all phenomena, leading us to understand, for instance, that the fate of the underdeveloped countries cannot be separated from that of the wealthy countries. Each war involves all countries.He refers to the Avatamsaka Sutra, which states that a speck of dust contains in itself infinite space and endless time. Time and space contain each other and are interdependent. This is backed by Einstein's theory of relativity, which he also analyzes.He discusses form and emptiness and concludes that "reality is beyond these two concepts". He also introduces a concept called "the miraculousness of existence", to be aware that the universe is contained in each thing and could not exist otherwise. We thus cannot say that something exists, or does not exist, thus the term "miraculous existence".He refers back and forth to various Sutras and modern science, demonstrating that the authors of the Sutras and scientists, such as Oppemheimer and Einstein, are saying the same thing, Thus, Oppenheimer indicated that electrons were beyond the concepts of being and non-being.The final chapter reverts to the discussion of meditation, mindfulness and happiness, as discoursed upon in his other books, and proved to be more easily comprehensible. Hanh refers to the "Four Immeasurables" . lovingkindness, compassion, sympathetic joy and non-attachment. In so far as you are developing these virtues in yourself, you are proceeding in the right direction.He provides us with a valuable topic of meditation - "If you want peace, peace is with you immediately". He tells us that our strength is in the peace within us. This peace empowers us to go out into the world and do what we want to do to help the downtrodden.This ia a valuable book, but a bit too intellectully challenging to my taste. Read it if you want to delve deeply into the nature of reality, both intellectually and via meditation.read more
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Reviews

I was somewhat disappointed in this book, since I was expecting something along the lines of previous little books by this author on mindfulness. This book proved different, though of course the subjects of mindfulness, breathing exercises and so on do come up. I suppose one could say that the topic of this book is the same as that of the others, this book just goes deeper (infinitely deeper).This book shows a highly intellectual, philosophical side of the author: He teaches us that mind and object are one, that "one is all, all is one". He thus discusses the interdependence of all phenomena, leading us to understand, for instance, that the fate of the underdeveloped countries cannot be separated from that of the wealthy countries. Each war involves all countries.He refers to the Avatamsaka Sutra, which states that a speck of dust contains in itself infinite space and endless time. Time and space contain each other and are interdependent. This is backed by Einstein's theory of relativity, which he also analyzes.He discusses form and emptiness and concludes that "reality is beyond these two concepts". He also introduces a concept called "the miraculousness of existence", to be aware that the universe is contained in each thing and could not exist otherwise. We thus cannot say that something exists, or does not exist, thus the term "miraculous existence".He refers back and forth to various Sutras and modern science, demonstrating that the authors of the Sutras and scientists, such as Oppemheimer and Einstein, are saying the same thing, Thus, Oppenheimer indicated that electrons were beyond the concepts of being and non-being.The final chapter reverts to the discussion of meditation, mindfulness and happiness, as discoursed upon in his other books, and proved to be more easily comprehensible. Hanh refers to the "Four Immeasurables" . lovingkindness, compassion, sympathetic joy and non-attachment. In so far as you are developing these virtues in yourself, you are proceeding in the right direction.He provides us with a valuable topic of meditation - "If you want peace, peace is with you immediately". He tells us that our strength is in the peace within us. This peace empowers us to go out into the world and do what we want to do to help the downtrodden.This ia a valuable book, but a bit too intellectully challenging to my taste. Read it if you want to delve deeply into the nature of reality, both intellectually and via meditation.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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