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Does drinking really kill brain cells? Does listening to Mozart make your baby smarter? For all the mileage we've gotten from our own brains, most of us have essentially no idea how they work. We're easily susceptible to myths (like the "fact" that we use only 10% of our brains) and misconceptions (like the ones perpetrated by most Hollywood movies), probably because we've never known where to turn for the truth.
But neurologists Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang are glad to help. In this funny, accessible book, we get a guided tour of our own minds, what they're made of, how they work, and how they can go wrong. Along the way, we get a host of diagrams, quizzes, and "cocktail party tips" that shed light on the questions we nag each other about. (Can a head injury make you forget your own name? Are dolphins smarter than chimpanzees?)
Fun and surprisingly engrossing, Welcome to Your Brain shows you how your brain works, and how you can make it work better.
Published: Bloomsbury USA an imprint of Bloomsbury USA on
ISBN: 9781596917064
List price: $14.99
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Interesting read. Felt my mind wandering off in a few places (I read beginning to end). Inlaid text boxes make it a bit hard to follow on a smaller screen but all in all a worthwhile read. more
A layperson's guide to the neuroscience of the brain. This is an easy to digest overview of how the workings of the brain affects perception, emotion, and the senses; and in turn how physical changes to your brain (because of drugs, injury, or illness) can affect perception and ability. The topic is fascinating and the authors hit a good balance between being overly complicated, and giving readers a "--for dummies" version. The authors address numerous facts that everyone "knows" about how the mind works that are just plain wrong, which may be disappointing or reassuring, depending on your point of view.That said, the book didn't resonate with me as I'd hoped. Other reviews have called the writing style dry, and it is, a bit. Additionally, I listened to the audio version, which suffered both by missing the drawings and charts that are included int he text, but also because the narrator has an annoying, superior tone that made me feel like a schoolchild being lectured. I think it's worth a read, but go for the text in this case.more
Dewey - 612.82This is a good book for those interested in the brain and how biology can affect psychology and vice versa. The authors give several great practical tips based on our understanding of the brain at this time. My only complaint about the book is the lack of diagrams, illustrations, and images to explain what they are talking about. The give a diagram of the brain areas early in the book, but it would have been helpful to see additional diagrams as new areas were mentioned and areas previously discussed were mentioned again. Of course, that criticism does comes from a visual learner who needs that visual to help in learning, so others may not feel that way.more
This is an appealing book - looking at first glance much like the "You!" books by Drs Oz and Roizen. The topics are, naturally, all related to the health, development, and functioning of the human brain. The book is divided into sections of similar topics, each with 4 or 5 chapters. The chapters are short - only 4 or 5 pages each - but there are more than 30 of them. Topics include the 5 senses, personality and behavior, memory and memory loss, and age-related development and learning. The chapters are designed to be stand-alone , and may be read in any order.I thought the topics were interesting, and the sidebar comments - especially the myth-buster discussions - were fun to read. The chapters, being so short, were fast and easy to read. But, I had trouble reading more than 2 chapters at a time. This book is more fun to browse than actually read cover-to-cover. The discussions weren't as engaging as those in the "You" books. There is only so much superficial information that can be presented in an intelligent and interesting manner. Technical information wasn't well explained, in an effort not to be too technical, I suppose. I came away with the feeling that I hadn't learned as much as I could have, since the authors choose to be breezy and entertaining instead of treating me like an intelligent lay person who can understand scientific subjects once they are explained to me.I don't think this is a bad book, but not great, either. I don't recommend avoiding it, but wouldn't suggest seeking it out, unless you have an interest in human health/development/behavior. This is a better choice for the library than the book store - worth some time spent reading, but not the money to purchase.more
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Reviews

Interesting read. Felt my mind wandering off in a few places (I read beginning to end). Inlaid text boxes make it a bit hard to follow on a smaller screen but all in all a worthwhile read. more
A layperson's guide to the neuroscience of the brain. This is an easy to digest overview of how the workings of the brain affects perception, emotion, and the senses; and in turn how physical changes to your brain (because of drugs, injury, or illness) can affect perception and ability. The topic is fascinating and the authors hit a good balance between being overly complicated, and giving readers a "--for dummies" version. The authors address numerous facts that everyone "knows" about how the mind works that are just plain wrong, which may be disappointing or reassuring, depending on your point of view.That said, the book didn't resonate with me as I'd hoped. Other reviews have called the writing style dry, and it is, a bit. Additionally, I listened to the audio version, which suffered both by missing the drawings and charts that are included int he text, but also because the narrator has an annoying, superior tone that made me feel like a schoolchild being lectured. I think it's worth a read, but go for the text in this case.more
Dewey - 612.82This is a good book for those interested in the brain and how biology can affect psychology and vice versa. The authors give several great practical tips based on our understanding of the brain at this time. My only complaint about the book is the lack of diagrams, illustrations, and images to explain what they are talking about. The give a diagram of the brain areas early in the book, but it would have been helpful to see additional diagrams as new areas were mentioned and areas previously discussed were mentioned again. Of course, that criticism does comes from a visual learner who needs that visual to help in learning, so others may not feel that way.more
This is an appealing book - looking at first glance much like the "You!" books by Drs Oz and Roizen. The topics are, naturally, all related to the health, development, and functioning of the human brain. The book is divided into sections of similar topics, each with 4 or 5 chapters. The chapters are short - only 4 or 5 pages each - but there are more than 30 of them. Topics include the 5 senses, personality and behavior, memory and memory loss, and age-related development and learning. The chapters are designed to be stand-alone , and may be read in any order.I thought the topics were interesting, and the sidebar comments - especially the myth-buster discussions - were fun to read. The chapters, being so short, were fast and easy to read. But, I had trouble reading more than 2 chapters at a time. This book is more fun to browse than actually read cover-to-cover. The discussions weren't as engaging as those in the "You" books. There is only so much superficial information that can be presented in an intelligent and interesting manner. Technical information wasn't well explained, in an effort not to be too technical, I suppose. I came away with the feeling that I hadn't learned as much as I could have, since the authors choose to be breezy and entertaining instead of treating me like an intelligent lay person who can understand scientific subjects once they are explained to me.I don't think this is a bad book, but not great, either. I don't recommend avoiding it, but wouldn't suggest seeking it out, unless you have an interest in human health/development/behavior. This is a better choice for the library than the book store - worth some time spent reading, but not the money to purchase.more
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