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IS THERE REALLY A GOD?
OR DOES GOD EXIST ONLY IN OUR HEADS?
IS THE BIBLE TRULY GOD’S WORD?
OR IS IT A JUMBLE OF FANCIFUL MYTHS?


Atheist Universe details why God is unnecessary to explain the universe’s diversity, organization and beauty. Using simple, straightforward logic, this book rebuts every argument that claims to prove” God’s existence.

A comprehensive primer for countering today’s religious dogma, Atheist Universe addresses all the historical and scientific questions, including:

What is atheism, and why is it so misunderstood?
If God is a myth, then how did the universe appear?
Without God, is there an objective right” and wrong”?
What is the meaning of life without God?
Is there evidence of Jesus’ miracles and resurrection?
Can atheists explain near death” experiences and medical miracles?
Can science and the Bible realistically be reconciled?
What is the behind-the-scenes relationship between politics and religion?

Published: Ulysses Press on May 1, 2009
ISBN: 9781569752630
List price: $14.95
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This is a well-written, concise, interesting overview of the argument against Christian fundamentalism … particularly Creationism.How did the universe come into being? We don’t know. But new discoveries in quantum theory, as well as research done by Stephen Hawking and his colleagues, have demonstrated that matter can and does arise quite spontaneously from the vacuum fluctuation energy of “empty” space.Intelligent Design? Mills states that “ID’s greatest triumph … has been in convincing the general public that there is a controversy raging among scientists over Intelligent Design. There is no scientific controversy whatever.”So how did life begin? Well, we know God isn’t necessary. There is no need for spontaneous creation of complex cells; the first cells contained no nucleus at all, consisting mainly of an exterior membrane. Biological membranes form easily and spontaneously from a mixture of water and simple lipids. From there, the evidence for evolution is overwhelming, and Mills carefully refutes argument after argument posed by creationists.Life after death? Forget having science on your side, here. For example, if the law of the conservation of mass/energy necessitates consciousness after death (because mass/energy can be neither destroyed nor created) then the same law requires consciousness before conception.There just isn’t any real debate among scientists in these matters. A study in 1998 revealed that, of the membership of the National Academy of Sciences, only 7 percent believed in a personal God, and even fewer in Creation Science or Intelligent Design. The point I took away from the book is this: Religious beliefs must remain beliefs; no more or less. The Bible’s creationist claims are not and cannot be supported by science.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
For the most part, this is a very interesting and quite detailed exploration of the inadequacies and illogical notions that so-called fundamentalist Christians have about life, the universe and our place in it all. It's probably not for every reader, of course, especially if one holds hard & fast traditional beliefs of God and the nature of the universe. Discounting the mysterious & very personal aspect of "faith", the book looks at various fundamentalist Christian beliefs from a purely logical and fact-based stance, and I think generally succeeds in climbing over or maneuvering around the inflexible walls of entrenched convictions (of God's existence & overwhelming control) that the topic usually brings up. Yet after reading the whole book, I still walked away wondering, "OK, if the fundamentalists have it all wrong [which I believe:], then what?"As interesting as it was, though, much of the book did feel a bit repetitious, with discussion of creationism and Intelligent Design treading on in multiple chapters more than I think was needed to make the point. Overall, the book seems to stumble in its apparent underlying attempt to sway the reader toward no belief and no Religious dogma, if that's even the target audience; in many ways it felt that other atheists & non-believers were the intended audience here, not Religious true believers interested in thoroughly learning about a new belief system & worldview.Even though I personally still can't totally buy into the strict atheist principle -- itself a dogma -- that no natural force (call it God, the Force, whatever) exists tying us and everything else together in a multifaceted flow of life (instead seeing love itself as the most inclusive, omnipresent and omnipotent force of all), the book's detailed exploration and curious questioning did help me feel more secure about some of my beliefs.Though tedious at times, in the end I did find it a pretty good, persuasive read. I also agree with another reviewer that the beginning of the book is probably the best, most interesting part, where the author is interviewed by Christian apologists and reasonably & deftly defends his views & beliefs.A cool point... The many quotes popping up throughout by various scientists, explorers, US government leaders & founders, artists, writers, and others was rather interesting.Originally written on Dec 31, 2009 at 09:10AMread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I think that atheism is misunderstood by a vast majority of people. That people who are atheists have no morals, are negetive people, believe in Satan.... I could go on. As if only people that believe in a god (or, well, THE GOD) are capable of moral decisions and worthy to be around children and puppies. And the satan thing.... don't get me started.Anyway, this book articulately answers these and many many more questions concerning atheism is a clear concise way. For those curious or looking to expand their knowledge base I suggest this novel. It's not huge (250 some pages) and I found it pretty easy to follow.The author uses some pretty straight forward logic in presenting his case explaining why 'God' is unnecessary. I think that even those that have a religious faith should read this and others in this vein. Not to necessarily turn them from their path, but to help them understand where others views are coming from.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

This is a well-written, concise, interesting overview of the argument against Christian fundamentalism … particularly Creationism.How did the universe come into being? We don’t know. But new discoveries in quantum theory, as well as research done by Stephen Hawking and his colleagues, have demonstrated that matter can and does arise quite spontaneously from the vacuum fluctuation energy of “empty” space.Intelligent Design? Mills states that “ID’s greatest triumph … has been in convincing the general public that there is a controversy raging among scientists over Intelligent Design. There is no scientific controversy whatever.”So how did life begin? Well, we know God isn’t necessary. There is no need for spontaneous creation of complex cells; the first cells contained no nucleus at all, consisting mainly of an exterior membrane. Biological membranes form easily and spontaneously from a mixture of water and simple lipids. From there, the evidence for evolution is overwhelming, and Mills carefully refutes argument after argument posed by creationists.Life after death? Forget having science on your side, here. For example, if the law of the conservation of mass/energy necessitates consciousness after death (because mass/energy can be neither destroyed nor created) then the same law requires consciousness before conception.There just isn’t any real debate among scientists in these matters. A study in 1998 revealed that, of the membership of the National Academy of Sciences, only 7 percent believed in a personal God, and even fewer in Creation Science or Intelligent Design. The point I took away from the book is this: Religious beliefs must remain beliefs; no more or less. The Bible’s creationist claims are not and cannot be supported by science.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
For the most part, this is a very interesting and quite detailed exploration of the inadequacies and illogical notions that so-called fundamentalist Christians have about life, the universe and our place in it all. It's probably not for every reader, of course, especially if one holds hard & fast traditional beliefs of God and the nature of the universe. Discounting the mysterious & very personal aspect of "faith", the book looks at various fundamentalist Christian beliefs from a purely logical and fact-based stance, and I think generally succeeds in climbing over or maneuvering around the inflexible walls of entrenched convictions (of God's existence & overwhelming control) that the topic usually brings up. Yet after reading the whole book, I still walked away wondering, "OK, if the fundamentalists have it all wrong [which I believe:], then what?"As interesting as it was, though, much of the book did feel a bit repetitious, with discussion of creationism and Intelligent Design treading on in multiple chapters more than I think was needed to make the point. Overall, the book seems to stumble in its apparent underlying attempt to sway the reader toward no belief and no Religious dogma, if that's even the target audience; in many ways it felt that other atheists & non-believers were the intended audience here, not Religious true believers interested in thoroughly learning about a new belief system & worldview.Even though I personally still can't totally buy into the strict atheist principle -- itself a dogma -- that no natural force (call it God, the Force, whatever) exists tying us and everything else together in a multifaceted flow of life (instead seeing love itself as the most inclusive, omnipresent and omnipotent force of all), the book's detailed exploration and curious questioning did help me feel more secure about some of my beliefs.Though tedious at times, in the end I did find it a pretty good, persuasive read. I also agree with another reviewer that the beginning of the book is probably the best, most interesting part, where the author is interviewed by Christian apologists and reasonably & deftly defends his views & beliefs.A cool point... The many quotes popping up throughout by various scientists, explorers, US government leaders & founders, artists, writers, and others was rather interesting.Originally written on Dec 31, 2009 at 09:10AM
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I think that atheism is misunderstood by a vast majority of people. That people who are atheists have no morals, are negetive people, believe in Satan.... I could go on. As if only people that believe in a god (or, well, THE GOD) are capable of moral decisions and worthy to be around children and puppies. And the satan thing.... don't get me started.Anyway, this book articulately answers these and many many more questions concerning atheism is a clear concise way. For those curious or looking to expand their knowledge base I suggest this novel. It's not huge (250 some pages) and I found it pretty easy to follow.The author uses some pretty straight forward logic in presenting his case explaining why 'God' is unnecessary. I think that even those that have a religious faith should read this and others in this vein. Not to necessarily turn them from their path, but to help them understand where others views are coming from.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Easy to understand compilation of the logical errors in theistic thinking. Unfortunately, he misses an obvious one: the "creation" of the universe from nothing as currently portrayed in the Big Bang Theory.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As an atheist, this book quickly became my "bible," and I learned quite a bit from reading it. I have a shelf full of atheist/agnostic books, but this one is one of my favorites. It is a good read for people that are already atheists, and a selling point for those that sit on the fence.
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If one is reading extensively in the debates between atheists and believers, including the evolution / ID debate, this book is worth reading, but it's not one of the first that I'd recommend.The book opens with an introduction dealing with the issue of whether daring to write such a book is an outrage. It then proceeds to a section of quotations from people who have criticized religion, and an interview with the author.Some of the arguments, like the varying genealogies of Jesus are excellent. Others, like the appearance of age in the earth, miss the point a bit. Some Christians hold that God created the world to look older than it is. Arguing plate tectonics is not a terribly logical response, since they could simply argue that as God created the appearance of fossils, he also created the appearance of continental drift. His arguments against God creating such an illusion are a better argument.Mills oddly enough ends with a chapter defending Internet porn. Its relationship to the rest of the book eludes me. It annoys me when people muddy their point be bringing in other issues. It narrows the appeal of an argument to require that people also believe in something that is very tangential. Is Mills trying to say that anyone who doesn't approve of Internet porn can't be an atheist or believe in evolution?I am myself an atheistic believer in evolution, and I found this very off-putting. I also wish that Mills had maintained a slightly less sneering tone: I don't like smugness in atheists any more than I like it in believers.I understand that a new, improved edition is being released.
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