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The Lost World

The Lost World

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The Lost World

ratings:
3/5 (873 ratings)
Length:
309 pages
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 10, 2015
ISBN:
9786155565007
Format:
Book

Description

Mr. Hungerton, her father, really was the most tactless person upon earth,—a fluffy, feathery, untidy cockatoo of a man, perfectly good-natured, but absolutely centered upon his own silly self. If anything could have driven me from Gladys, it would have been the thought of such a father-in-law. I am convinced that he really believed in his heart that I came round to the Chestnuts three days a week for the pleasure of his company, and very especially to hear his views upon bimetallism, a subject upon which he was by way of being an authority.


For an hour or more that evening I listened to his monotonous chirrup about bad money driving out good, the token value of silver, the depreciation of the rupee, and the true standards of exchange.


"Suppose," he cried with feeble violence, "that all the debts in the world were called up simultaneously, and immediate payment insisted upon,—what under our present conditions would happen then?"


I gave the self-evident answer that I should be a ruined man, upon which he jumped from his chair, reproved me for my habitual levity, which made it impossible for him to discuss any reasonable subject in my presence, and bounced off out of the room to dress for a Masonic meeting.


At last I was alone with Gladys, and the moment of Fate had come! All that evening I had felt like the soldier who awaits the signal which will send him on a forlorn hope; hope of victory and fear of repulse alternating in his mind.


She sat with that proud, delicate profile of hers outlined against the red curtain. How beautiful she was! And yet how aloof! We had been friends, quite good friends; but never could I get beyond the same comradeship which I might have established with one of my fellow-reporters upon the Gazette,—perfectly frank, perfectly kindly, and perfectly unsexual. My instincts are all against a woman being too frank and at her ease with me. It is no compliment to a man. Where the real sex feeling begins, timidity and distrust are its companions, heritage from old wicked days when love and violence went often hand in hand. The bent head, the averted eye, the faltering voice, the wincing figure—these, and not the unshrinking gaze and frank reply, are the true signals of passion. Even in my short life I had learned as much as that—or had inherited it in that race memory which we call instinct.


Gladys was full of every womanly quality. Some judged her to be cold and hard; but such a thought was treason. That delicately bronzed skin, almost oriental in its coloring, that raven hair, the large liquid eyes, the full but exquisite lips,—all the stigmata of passion were there. But I was sadly conscious that up to now I had never found the secret of drawing it forth. However, come what might, I should have done with suspense and bring matters to a head to-night. She could but refuse me, and better be a repulsed lover than an accepted brother.


So far my thoughts had carried me, and I was about to break the long and uneasy silence, when two critical, dark eyes looked round at me, and the proud head was shaken in smiling reproof. "I have a presentiment that you are going to propose, Ned. I do wish you wouldn't; for things are so much nicer as they are."


I drew my chair a little nearer. "Now, how did you know that I was going to propose?" I asked in genuine wonder.
"Don't women always know? Do you suppose any woman in the world was ever taken unawares? But—oh, Ned, our friendship has been so good and so pleasant! What a pity to spoil it! Don't you feel how splendid it is that a young man and a young woman should be able to talk face to face as we have talked?"

Publisher:
Released:
Apr 10, 2015
ISBN:
9786155565007
Format:
Book

About the author

YAZAR:MURAT UKRAYYetkinlikler:Aynı zamanda bir yazar olan ve yaklaşık genel araştırma konuları ile fizikle ve birleşik alan kramı ile ilgili 2006’dan beri kaleme aldığı yaklaşık 12 eseri bulunan Murat UKRAY, yine bunları kendi kurmuş olduğu çeşitli web siteleri üzerinden, kitaplarını sadece dijital elektronik ortamda, hem düzenli olarak yılda yazmış veya yayınlamış olduğu diğer eserleri de yayın hayatına e-KİTAP ve POD (Print on Demand -talebe göre yayıncılık-) sistemine göre yayın hayatına geçirerek okurlarına sunmayı ilke olarak edinirken; diğer yandan da, projenin SOSYAL yönü olan doğayı korumak amaçlı başlattığı "e-KİTAP PROJESİ" isimli yayıncılık sistemiyle KİTABINI KLASİK SİSTEMLE YAYINLAYAMAYAN "AMATÖR YAZARLAR" için, elektronik ortamda kitap yayıncılığı ile kitaplarını bu sistemle yayınlatmak isteyen PROFESYONEL yayıncılar ve yazarlar için de hemen hemen her çeşit kitabın (MAKALE, AKADEMİK DERS KİTABI, ŞİİR, ROMAN, HİKAYE, DENEME, GÜNLÜK TASLAK) elektronik ortamda yayıncılığının önünü açan e-YAYINCILIĞA 2010 yılı başlarından beri başlamıştır ve halen daha ilgili projeleri yürütmektedir..Aynı zamanda YAZAR KOÇLUĞU ve KUANTUM & BİRLEŞİK ANA KURAMI doğrultusunda, kişisel gelişim uzmanlığı konularında da faaliyet göstermektedir..Çalışma alanları:Köşe yazarlığı yapmak, Profesyonel yazarlık (12 yıldır), Blog yazarlığı, web sitesi kurulumu, PHP Programlama, elektronik ticaret sistemleri, Sanal kütüphane uygulamaları, e-Kitap Uygulamaları ve Yazılımları, Kişisel gelişim, Kuantum mekaniği ve Birleşik Alan teorisi ile ilgili Kuramsal ve Uygulama çalışmaları..


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The Lost World - Murat Ukray

WORLD

Chapter I

There Are Heroisms All Round Us

Mr. Hungerton, her father, really was the most tactless person upon earth,—a fluffy, feathery, untidy cockatoo of a man, perfectly good-natured, but absolutely centered upon his own silly self. If anything could have driven me from Gladys, it would have been the thought of such a father-in-law. I am convinced that he really believed in his heart that I came round to the Chestnuts three days a week for the pleasure of his company, and very especially to hear his views upon bimetallism, a subject upon which he was by way of being an authority.

For an hour or more that evening I listened to his monotonous chirrup about bad money driving out good, the token value of silver, the depreciation of the rupee, and the true standards of exchange.

Suppose, he cried with feeble violence, that all the debts in the world were called up simultaneously, and immediate payment insisted upon,—what under our present conditions would happen then?

I gave the self-evident answer that I should be a ruined man, upon which he jumped from his chair, reproved me for my habitual levity, which made it impossible for him to discuss any reasonable subject in my presence, and bounced off out of the room to dress for a Masonic meeting.

At last I was alone with Gladys, and the moment of Fate had come! All that evening I had felt like the soldier who awaits the signal which will send him on a forlorn hope; hope of victory and fear of repulse alternating in his mind.

She sat with that proud, delicate profile of hers outlined against the red curtain. How beautiful she was! And yet how aloof! We had been friends, quite good friends; but never could I get beyond the same comradeship which I might have established with one of my fellow-reporters upon the Gazette,—perfectly frank, perfectly kindly, and perfectly unsexual. My instincts are all against a woman being too frank and at her ease with me. It is no compliment to a man. Where the real sex feeling begins, timidity and distrust are its companions, heritage from old wicked days when love and violence went often hand in hand. The bent head, the averted eye, the faltering voice, the wincing figure—these, and not the unshrinking gaze and frank reply, are the true signals of passion. Even in my short life I had learned as much as that—or had inherited it in that race memory which we call instinct.

Gladys was full of every womanly quality. Some judged her to be cold and hard; but such a thought was treason. That delicately bronzed skin, almost oriental in its coloring, that raven hair, the large liquid eyes, the full but exquisite lips,—all the stigmata of passion were there. But I was sadly conscious that up to now I had never found the secret of drawing it forth. However, come what might, I should have done with suspense and bring matters to a head to-night. She could but refuse me, and better be a repulsed lover than an accepted brother.

So far my thoughts had carried me, and I was about to break the long and uneasy silence, when two critical, dark eyes looked round at me, and the proud head was shaken in smiling reproof. I have a presentiment that you are going to propose, Ned. I do wish you wouldn't; for things are so much nicer as they are.

I drew my chair a little nearer. Now, how did you know that I was going to propose? I asked in genuine wonder.

Don't women always know? Do you suppose any woman in the world was ever taken unawares? But—oh, Ned, our friendship has been so good and so pleasant! What a pity to spoil it! Don't you feel how splendid it is that a young man and a young woman should be able to talk face to face as we have talked?

I don't know, Gladys. You see, I can talk face to face with—with the station-master. I can't imagine how that official came into the matter; but in he trotted, and set us both laughing. That does not satisfy me in the least. I want my arms round you, and your head on my breast, and—oh, Gladys, I want——

She had sprung from her chair, as she saw signs that I proposed to demonstrate some of my wants. You've spoiled everything, Ned, she said. It's all so beautiful and natural until this kind of thing comes in! It is such a pity! Why can't you control yourself?

I didn't invent it, I pleaded. It's nature. It's love.

Well, perhaps if both love, it may be different. I have never felt it.

But you must—you, with your beauty, with your soul! Oh, Gladys, you were made for love! You must love!

One must wait till it comes.

But why can't you love me, Gladys? Is it my appearance, or what?

She did unbend a little. She put forward a hand—such a gracious, stooping attitude it was—and she pressed back my head. Then she looked into my upturned face with a very wistful smile.

No it isn't that, she said at last. You're not a conceited boy by nature, and so I can safely tell you it is not that. It's deeper.

My character?

She nodded severely.

What can I do to mend it? Do sit down and talk it over. No, really, I won't if you'll only sit down!

She looked at me with a wondering distrust which was much more to my mind than her whole-hearted confidence. How primitive and bestial it looks when you put it down in black and white!—and perhaps after all it is only a feeling peculiar to myself. Anyhow, she sat down.

Now tell me what's amiss with me?

I'm in love with somebody else, said she.

It was my turn to jump out of my chair.

It's nobody in particular, she explained, laughing at the expression of my face: only an ideal. I've never met the kind of man I mean.

Tell me about him. What does he look like?

Oh, he might look very much like you.

How dear of you to say that! Well, what is it that he does that I don't do? Just say the word,—teetotal, vegetarian, aeronaut, theosophist, superman. I'll have a try at it, Gladys, if you will only give me an idea what would please you.

She laughed at the elasticity of my character. Well, in the first place, I don't think my ideal would speak like that, said she. He would be a harder, sterner man, not so ready to adapt himself to a silly girl's whim. But, above all, he must be a man who could do, who could act, who could look Death in the face and have no fear of him, a man of great deeds and strange experiences. It is never a man that I should love, but always the glories he had won; for they would be reflected upon me. Think of Richard Burton! When I read his wife's life of him I could so understand her love! And Lady Stanley! Did you ever read the wonderful last chapter of that book about her husband? These are the sort of men that a woman could worship with all her soul, and yet be the greater, not the less, on account of her love, honored by all the world as the inspirer of noble deeds.

She looked so beautiful in her enthusiasm that I nearly brought down the whole level of the interview. I gripped myself hard, and went on with the argument.

We can't all be Stanleys and Burtons, said I; besides, we don't get the chance,—at least, I never had the chance. If I did, I should try to take it.

But chances are all around you. It is the mark of the kind of man I mean that he makes his own chances. You can't hold him back. I've never met him, and yet I seem to know him so well. There are heroisms all round us waiting to be done. It's for men to do them, and for women to reserve their love as a reward for such men. Look at that young Frenchman who went up last week in a balloon. It was blowing a gale of wind; but because he was announced to go he insisted on starting. The wind blew him fifteen hundred miles in twenty-four hours, and he fell in the middle of Russia. That was the kind of man I mean. Think of the woman he loved, and how other women must have envied her! That's what I should like to be,—envied for my man.

I'd have done it to please you.

But you shouldn't do it merely to please me. You should do it because you can't help yourself, because it's natural to you, because the man in you is crying out for heroic expression. Now, when you described the Wigan coal explosion last month, could you not have gone down and helped those people, in spite of the choke-damp?

I did.

You never said so.

There was nothing worth bucking about.

I didn't know. She looked at me with rather more interest. That was brave of you.

I had to. If you want to write good copy, you must be where the things are.

What a prosaic motive! It seems to take all the romance out of it. But, still, whatever your motive, I am glad that you went down that mine. She gave me her hand; but with such sweetness and dignity that I could only stoop and kiss it. I dare say I am merely a foolish woman with a young girl's fancies. And yet it is so real with me, so entirely part of my very self, that I cannot help acting upon it. If I marry, I do want to marry a famous man!

Why should you not? I cried. It is women like you who brace men up. Give me a chance, and see if I will take it! Besides, as you say, men ought to MAKE their own chances, and not wait until they are given. Look at Clive—just a clerk, and he conquered India! By George! I'll do something in the world yet!

She laughed at my sudden Irish effervescence. Why not? she said. You have everything a man could have,—youth, health, strength, education, energy. I was sorry you spoke. And now I am glad—so glad—if it wakens these thoughts in you!

And if I do——

Her dear hand rested like warm velvet upon my lips. Not another word, Sir! You should have been at the office for evening duty half an hour ago; only I hadn't the heart to remind you. Some day, perhaps, when you have won your place in the world, we shall talk it over again.

And so it was that I found myself that foggy November evening pursuing the Camberwell tram with my heart glowing within me, and with the eager determination that not another day should elapse before I should find some deed which was worthy of my lady. But who—who in all this wide world could ever have imagined the incredible shape which that deed was to take, or the strange steps by which I was led to the doing of it?

And, after all, this opening chapter will seem to the reader to have nothing to do with my narrative; and yet there would have been no narrative without it, for it is only when a man goes out into the world with the thought that there are heroisms all round him, and with the desire all alive in his heart to follow any which may come within sight of him, that he breaks away as I did from the life he knows, and ventures forth into the wonderful mystic twilight land where lie the great adventures and the great rewards. Behold me, then, at the office of the Daily Gazette, on the staff of which I was a most insignificant unit, with the settled determination that very night, if possible, to find the quest which should be worthy of my Gladys! Was it hardness, was it selfishness, that she should ask me to risk my life for her own glorification? Such thoughts may come to middle age; but never to ardent three-and-twenty in the fever of his first love.

Chapter II

Try Your Luck with Professor Challenger

I always liked McArdle, the crabbed, old, round-backed, red-headed news editor, and I rather hoped that he liked me. Of course, Beaumont was the real boss; but he lived in the rarefied atmosphere of some Olympian height from which he could distinguish nothing smaller than an international crisis or a split in the Cabinet. Sometimes we saw him passing in lonely majesty to his inner sanctum, with his eyes staring vaguely and his mind hovering over the Balkans or the Persian Gulf. He was above and beyond us. But McArdle was his first lieutenant, and it was he that we knew. The old man nodded as I entered the room, and he pushed his spectacles far up on his bald forehead.

Well, Mr. Malone, from all I hear, you seem to be doing very well, said he in his kindly Scotch accent.

I thanked him.

The colliery explosion was excellent. So was the Southwark fire. You have the true descreeptive touch. What did you want to see me about?

To ask a favor.

He looked alarmed, and his eyes shunned mine. Tut, tut! What is it?

Do you think, Sir, that you could possibly send me on some mission for the paper? I would do my best to put it through and get you some good copy.

What sort of meesion had you in your mind, Mr. Malone?

Well, Sir, anything that had adventure and danger in it. I really would do my very best. The more difficult it was, the better it would suit me.

You seem very anxious to lose your life.

To justify my life, Sir.

Dear me, Mr. Malone, this is very—very exalted. I'm afraid the day for this sort of thing is rather past. The expense of the 'special meesion' business hardly justifies the result, and, of course, in any case it would only be an experienced man with a name that would command public confidence who would get such an order. The big blank spaces in the map are all being filled in, and there's no room for romance anywhere. Wait a bit, though! he added, with a sudden smile upon his face. Talking of the blank spaces of the map gives me an idea. What about exposing a fraud—a modern Munchausen—and making him rideeculous? You could show him up as the liar that he is! Eh, man, it would be fine. How does it appeal to you?

Anything—anywhere—I care nothing.

McArdle was plunged in thought for some minutes.

I wonder whether you could get on friendly—or at least on talking terms with the fellow, he said, at last. You seem to have a sort of genius for establishing relations with people—seempathy, I suppose, or animal magnetism, or youthful vitality, or something. I am conscious of it myself.

You are very good, sir.

So why should you not try your luck with Professor Challenger, of Enmore Park?

I dare say I looked a little startled.

Challenger! I cried. Professor Challenger, the famous zoologist! Wasn't he the man who broke the skull of Blundell, of the Telegraph?

The news editor smiled grimly.

Do you mind? Didn't you say it was adventures you were after?

It is all in the way of business, sir, I answered.

Exactly. I don't suppose he can always be so violent as that. I'm thinking that Blundell got him at the wrong moment, maybe, or in the wrong fashion. You may have better luck, or more tact in handling him. There's something in your line there, I am sure, and the Gazette should work it.

I really know nothing about him, said I. I only remember his name in connection with the police-court proceedings, for striking Blundell.

I have a few notes for your guidance, Mr. Malone. I've had my eye on the Professor for some little time. He took a paper from a drawer. "Here is a summary of his record. I give it you briefly:—

'Challenger, George Edward. Born: Largs, N. B., 1863. Educ.: Largs Academy; Edinburgh University. British Museum Assistant, 1892. Assistant-Keeper of Comparative Anthropology Department, 1893. Resigned after acrimonious correspondence same year. Winner of Crayston Medal for Zoological Research. Foreign Member of'—well, quite a lot of things, about two inches of small type—'Societe Belge, American Academy of Sciences, La Plata, etc., etc. Ex-President Palaeontological Society. Section H, British Association'—so on, so on!—'Publications: Some Observations Upon a Series of Kalmuck Skulls; Outlines of Vertebrate Evolution; and numerous papers, including The underlying fallacy of Weissmannism," which caused heated discussion at the Zoological Congress of Vienna. Recreations: Walking, Alpine climbing. Address: Enmore Park, Kensington, W.'

There, take it with you. I've nothing more for you to-night.

I pocketed the slip of paper.

One moment, sir, I said, as I realized that it was a pink bald head, and not a red face, which was fronting me. I am not very clear yet why I am to interview this gentleman. What has he done?

The face flashed back again.

Went to South America on a solitary expedeetion two years ago. Came back last year. Had undoubtedly been to South America, but refused to say exactly where. Began to tell his adventures in a vague way, but somebody started to pick holes, and he just shut up like an oyster. Something wonderful happened—or the man's a champion liar, which is the more probable supposeetion. Had some damaged photographs, said to be fakes. Got so touchy that he assaults anyone who asks questions, and heaves reporters down the stairs. In my opinion he's just a homicidal megalomaniac with a turn for science. That's your man, Mr. Malone. Now, off you run, and see what you can make of him. You're big enough to look after yourself. Anyway, you are all safe. Employers' Liability Act, you know.

A grinning red face turned once more into a pink oval, fringed with gingery fluff; the interview was at an end.

I walked across to the Savage Club, but instead of turning into it I leaned upon the railings of Adelphi Terrace and gazed thoughtfully for a long time at the brown, oily river. I can always think most sanely and clearly in the open air. I took out the list of Professor Challenger's exploits, and I read it over under the electric lamp. Then I had what I can only regard as an inspiration. As a Pressman, I felt sure from what I had been told that I could never hope to get into touch with this cantankerous Professor. But these recriminations, twice mentioned in his skeleton biography, could only mean that he was a fanatic in science. Was there not an exposed margin there upon which he might be accessible? I would try.

I entered the club. It was just after eleven, and the big room was fairly full, though the rush had not yet set in. I noticed a tall, thin, angular man seated in an arm-chair by the fire. He turned as I drew my chair up to him. It was the man of all others whom I should have chosen—Tarp Henry, of the staff of Nature, a thin, dry, leathery creature, who was full, to those who knew him, of kindly humanity. I plunged instantly into my subject.

What do you know of Professor Challenger?

Challenger? He gathered his brows in scientific disapproval. Challenger was the man who came with some cock-and-bull story from South America.

What story?

Oh, it was rank nonsense about some queer animals he had discovered. I believe he has retracted since. Anyhow, he has suppressed it all. He gave an interview to Reuter's, and there was such a howl that he saw it wouldn't do. It was a discreditable business. There were one or two folk who were inclined to take him seriously, but he soon choked them off.

How?

Well, by his insufferable rudeness and impossible behavior. There was poor old Wadley, of the Zoological Institute. Wadley sent a message: 'The President of the Zoological Institute presents his compliments to Professor Challenger, and would take it as a personal favor if he would do them the honor to come to their next meeting.' The answer was unprintable.

You don't say?

Well, a bowdlerized version of it would run: 'Professor Challenger presents his compliments to the President of the Zoological Institute, and would take it as a personal favor if he would go to the devil.'

Good Lord!

Yes, I expect that's what old Wadley said. I remember his wail at the meeting, which began: 'In fifty years experience of scientific intercourse——' It quite broke the old man up.

Anything more about Challenger?

Well, I'm a bacteriologist, you know. I live in a nine-hundred-diameter microscope. I can hardly claim to take serious notice of anything that I can see with my naked eye. I'm a frontiersman from the extreme edge of the Knowable, and I feel quite out of place when I leave my study and come into touch with all you great, rough, hulking creatures. I'm too detached to talk scandal, and yet at scientific conversaziones I HAVE heard something of Challenger, for he is one of those men whom nobody can ignore. He's as clever as they make 'em—a full-charged battery of force and vitality, but a quarrelsome, ill-conditioned faddist, and unscrupulous at that. He had gone the length of faking some photographs over the South American business.

You say he is a faddist. What is his particular fad?

He has a thousand, but the latest is something about Weissmann and Evolution. He had a fearful row about it in Vienna, I believe.

Can't you tell me the point?

Not at the moment, but a translation of the proceedings exists. We have it filed at the office. Would you care to come?

"It's just what I want. I have to interview the fellow, and I need some lead up to him.

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What people think about The Lost World

3.0
873 ratings / 47 Reviews
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  • (3/5)
    A quick read. Lots of action, dinosaurs, primitive tribes and weird beasties. Not bad but nowhere near as good as his Sherlock Holmes stories.
  • (4/5)
    A romp into the deep of the Amazon in search of glory. This novel was very palatable and exploratory of the wide range of the imagination, fancy, and possibility. Despite the fact that it is not grounded in any fact, it manages to accelerate with adventure until the final denouement- which is then surprising in itself and the ending is one to be remembered.3.5 stars!
  • (4/5)
    Professor Challenger goes on an expedition to an isolated plateau in South America where he is shocked to discover that dinosaurs still exist. Arthur Conan Doyle's science fiction series.
  • (3/5)
    Arthur Conan Doyle. It didn't really hold up well. I guess it is just to familiar and dated.
  • (4/5)
    In an effort to win the heart of a fickle young lady, intrepid newspaper reporter Edward Malone volunteers as a member of an expedition to South America to seek proof or otherwise debunk the wild claims of arrogant and intractable paleontologist Professor George Edward Challenger.Upon returning from South America many years prior, Challenger claimed to have discovered prehistoric life still thriving atop a plateau deep in the jungles of Brazil. Unfortunately, his camera was damaged during a boating accident, leaving him with scant and inconclusive photographic evidence and only the sketchbook of one Maple White, a poet and artist who died of severe injuries shortly after escaping this supposed land of dinosaurs.During a contentious interview, Challenger permits Malone to peruse the sketchbook, wherein White had drawn numerous mundane flora and fauna—until the final image of an impossibly large reptilian creature. Malone, however, remains unconvinced.Despite his unadulterated aversion toward the press, Challenger sees some potential in Malone and invites him to a meeting of the Zoological Society where Professor Challenger, living up to his name, disrupts the guest lecturer when mention is made of the extinction of the dinosaur before the dawning of man.Challenger’s claims of eyewitness accounts of pterodactyls in Brazil draws ridicule from both the audience and his peers, including one botanist and zoologist Professor Summerlee. By the end of the raucous evening, a new team of explorers agrees to travel to Brazil and put the matter to rest. In addition to Malone and Summerlee, famed adventurer and big game hunter Sir John Roxton offers his considerable skills.Shortly thereafter, the trio embark for South America and are surprised by the appearance of Professor Challenger himself once they reach Brazil. Challenger naturally assumes the role of team leader and guide as the adventurers, along with a number of local hired hands, begin their voyage along the Amazon into the realm of the unknown—where they encounter far more than any of them ever imagined possible.The story is told from the POV of the reporter, Edward Malone, as he journals the team’s adventures through this unfathomable—and unmistakably treacherous—domain. It had been at least 30 years since I’d last read The Lost World, yet so many elements remained with me since then, such as the cantankerous and haughty Professor Challenger, the fearsome ape men, the pterodactyl pit, and a few other vivid details. After reading it again this past week, I found myself just as enthralled as I was the first time. This should come as no surprise since much of Doyle’s work, most notably Sherlock Holmes, has soundly withstood the test of time.
  • (4/5)
    Journalist Edward Malone wants to impress his girlfriend with his heroic prowess. He asks his editor for an assignment worthy of such a challenge, and he’s given the assignment to interview Professor George Edward Challenger, a noted zoologist notorious for his hostility to the press. The last reporter that attempted a word with him ended up with a broken skull. Challenger has recently returned from South America with some damaged photographs and the sketch book of a previous explorer depicting prehistoric beasts. Challenger is sure that they were drawn from a live model, and he intends to prove it. It was delightful to reread this old favorite in a new illustrated edition. This 1912 action adventure by the creator of Sherlock Holmes became the basis for the original creature feature silent film in 1925.What struck me was Doyle’s technique of indicating action in the midst of dialog, and the implicit racism of the time. The four adventurous explorers, three Anglos and an Irishman, are aided by a support team of “a gigantic negro named Zambo, who is a black Hercules, as willing as any horse, and about as intelligent. … Gomez and Manuel, two half-breeds … They were swarthy fellows, bearded and fierce, as active and wiry as panthers. … [and] three Mojo Indians from Bolivia.” (page 67) As it turns out Zambo is both heroic and faithful, not to mention having the wits to stick around and provide information to the outside world when the white people find themselves stranded; the half-breeds are deceitful and traitorous (although they are significantly less bearded and swarthy than Professor Challenger) and the Indians run away when they get scared, which is behavior also demonstrated by the Europeans. It’s interesting to read this in 2017 and see how much attitudes have changes and not changed in the following century.
  • (5/5)
    The all-time Doyle classic about exploration and dinosaurs, by way of the late Victorian era. If Doyle ever came close to breaking with his identification, it was with arrogant, bombastic Professor George Edward Challenger. Just the idea of a South American tepui offering a refuge to dinosaurs who survived their extinction elsewhere.... Just great. I've read this book six times or so over the past 50 years since learning to read and may find myself doing it again. Don't miss.
  • (2/5)
    Quick read, lots of fun at parts. Horribly racist 105 years after publication.
  • (4/5)
    Great fun.
  • (5/5)
    The Lost World was both my first foray into reading Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and my first experience reading a full-length e-book. First of all, my impressions of the electronic format for reading have been significantly improved by this experience. Although I still would prefer to read with a book in hand, I can appreciate the portability and convenience of this medium. I do not own an actual e-reader, so when I one day do own one, I may have to increase my current liking of the electronic format, but suffice it to say for the time being that I did not hate this format and using the Kindle for PC format provided by Amazon.com I enjoyed the fact that I could access my "book" at the place that I had left off from any of my computers whether at home, work or traveling. My opinions of the novel itself could not be more glowing. For such a short novel, I am amazed that I found such richness in the characters, storyline, prose, action and content as I was exposed to in The Lost World. Doyle has done an amazing job of creating unique, interesting and fully fleshed out characters. The story contains plenty of excitement and adventure and most of his scientific reasoning is plausible especially considering the time in which the novel was written. I had always had it in mind that I needed to read the Sherlock Holmes stories of Doyle but just hadn't gotten around to it yet. Now I know that I must read more of his works, not only the Holmes stories but now the Challenger series as well. Professor Challenger is one of the most outlandish, boisterous and absolutely wonderful characters in literature and I am a bit surprised that I really hadn't heard too much about the character before reading this besides in another GoodReads members' review that prompted me to read this in the first place. Overall, a fun well-written novel that transcends it's age and really doesn't feel terrible dated that I thoroughly enjoyed! (And yes, I will be reading more books in e-book format as well.)
  • (3/5)
    A fun rip roaring Victorian(ish) adventure. Not sure an introduction is needed..but it's a tale of expedition to a hidden plateau, a land where dinosaurs roam and an ancient war rages between humans and ape men. I confess I dislike the Sherlock Holmes books so I have never tried his other books which is a shame because its immensely enjoyable. It has aged rather well, enhanced by more recent versions it almost seems pastiche, with its stereotypes and dubious moral messages. The story moves along at a fair old pace, humorous & exciting in equal measure (although I may of brought a tiny bit of the humour with me). The characters are best thing though; the gentleman adventurer, the keen young journalist, the dastardly savages and my favourite the larger than life professor. The only downside was a minor one (hardly any dinosaurs!) so I might check out more in the Professor Challenger series.
  • (3/5)
    A good, and interesting, Ripping Yarn but spoiled for modern readers by the racism, sexism, classism throughout. Of course, like so many of these type of stories, it's of its era and I wouldn't like to see it edited for greater political correctness. I enjoy Ripping Yarns, on the whole, but some have so much of these outdated opinions that it becomes too intrusive to read comfortably and this one was verging on that level but it was leavened somewhat by the humour and excitement of the story.
  • (4/5)
    As a teenager, I had a lot of fun when Jurassic Park came to the theaters in the '90s. After enjoying the movie, I sought out and read the book which I also found very enjoyable. Spurred by its success, a sequel was created, The Lost World. Like many sequels, it wasn't as good as the original. It still had its fun elements but for me at least, it lost a good deal of the charm and fun from the first book.I think in part it was the Jurassic Park sequel that kept me from seeking out and reading the far earlier book The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle. Not only was I not terribly impressed by the 1990s book/movie of the same name, but I was a little unsure of the transition Conan Doyle would make going from Sherlock Holmes to a world of dinosaurs. Fortunately, I finally gave it a try.Not surprisingly, the Conan Doyle book is considerably slower paced than the Michael Chrichton adventures. The book was serialized in 1912 is set in the late 19th or early 20th century. The story is told through a series of newspaper articles and letters written by Malone, a newspaper reporter eager to impress his girlfriend and make a name for himself in the news world. Malone's editor McArdle gives Malone the assignment of interviewing Professor Challenger. Challenger is a scientist making outrageous claims and evoking his violent temper against anybody who questions them. Before long, Malone finds himself on a journey deep into the jungles of South America in search of a world which Challengers claims is inhabited by prehistoric creatures.As you might expect from the author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, this book is filled with lengthy and very detailed descriptions of settings, characterizations, behaviors and motivations. Malone has a reporter's eye for detail taken to the extreme. He painstakingly describes the minute details of Professor Challenger as well as the various traveling companions with whom Malone sets off in search of the Lost World. The early parts of the book are set in London and involve weighty scenes of research and discussion to decide what's what and what's to be done about it all. When we finally do start winding through the jungles, we are still given intense descriptions of the surroundings and the actions.For those looking for adventure, you'll finally find it about midway through the book once the characters have finally found passage into the elusive Lost World. Though even once they finally reach their destination, there are still many pages of suspenseful investigation before any major confrontation with prehistoric adventure. Their investigation and exploration is careful and methodical. As they are confronted with challenges, they quietly and calmly attempt deduce solutions as efficiently as possible even amidst deadly time constraints.Looking back over my thoughts, it may sound that this is a dry travel narrative rather than a rousing adventure. While it does have elements of a 19th century travelogue, the book also does a good job of amazing the reader with new ideas and concepts as well as taking us on an exciting adventure with unexpected twists and turns. I admit that it was sometimes hard to imagine that these adventurers would be so calm and level headed among all the troubles and adventures they encounter, but part of that is just the style of the era. The other part comes from the distinct characterization of these individuals. Each of the travelers possesses a personality prone more to smart, strategic level-headedness than rash and frantic running around.The first portion of the book was an interesting read and well crafted. I enjoyed the style and pacing overall but often found myself wanting to skip ahead to "where the real action was." Once we got into the adventure portion of this adventure novel, the style of writing remained precise and well defined while still providing us with surprising new elements and mysteries. I think that if you were to start reading the book at the midpoint, without first becoming accustomed to Conan Doyle's narrative style, the adventure would have felt more strained. You gain a greater sense of the style after plodding along with Malone and the others as they dealt with the minutia of getting the journey underway and slowly reaching their destination.I suspect that Conan Doyle's "Lost World" was for its time what Jurassic Park was for ours…a fun and exciting tale of fantastic adventure set along the edge of speculative science and imagination. I really enjoyed this story. After finishing this book, I learned that Conan Doyle wrote a number of other stories featuring Professor Challenger. I'm looking forward to reading those and some of his other non-Sherlockian works.*****4 out of 5 stars
  • (4/5)
    Still a surprisingly readable and fun adventure yarn, that doesn't really show its age, despite the cheerful racism throughout. The adventurers' willingness to participate in genocide and slavery is a bit much for modern sensibilities, but we must take the story in the spirit in which it was intended.
  • (5/5)
    It was an interesting read, not a bad adventure at all.Would love to know what England did about the surprise at the end of the book.
  • (3/5)
    Most people when they think of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle think of his sleuth Sherlock Holmes and trusty sidekick Dr. Watson. (I’ll admit that I do, too.) But, Doyle wrote more than just mysteries. The Lost World is about Professor Challenger finding what he believed to be a plateau in an unexplored region of South America which still held living dinosaurs.Challenger returns to England where, of course, no one believes there are actually still dinosaurs roaming the Earth. He enlists the help of a reporter who is trying to prove the woman he is in love with that he is more than just a measly reporter, a professor of Anatomy by the name of Summerlee, and Lord John Roxton a sportsman and traveler. Shortly after the crew was assembled they began their journey from England to South America and down the Amazon River.Eventually they reach the point at which Challenger points out the great plateau. There is however no way to get up there as they only way up had been blocked off. After trial and error they find themselves on top of the plateau, trapped no less because of unforeseen events. They find though that Challenger was indeed correct. There were dinosaurs living on the plateau. There were also creatures, a cross between an ape and a human, which were smart and managed to capture Challenger and Summerlee.It was during this capture that the crew found that there also happened to be a tribe of natives who lived on the plateau as well. The natives claim not to know of a way off the plateau, or don’t want to help the crew off (after many failed attempts). Eventually, a young native takes pity on them and shows them the way.They make their way back to England with their findings and the reporter who wrote down an account of the entire trip to be put in to print. I think I’ll leave out the ending and make you read it if you are curious enough to want to find out.While I enjoyed reading this book, it wasn’t quite different than what I was used to when reading Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes. Challenger and Holmes have many of the same qualities. I would say, however, if you liked Holmes than you should giveThe Lost World a read.
  • (4/5)
    A young journalist, Edward Malone, is looking for adventure. He meets with Professor Challenger who claims that a prehistoric lost world exists on a plateau in South America. During a raucous meeting at the Zoological Institute Hall, Challenger presents his controversial evidence. A fellow zoologist, Mr. Summerlee, refutes Challenger’s claims and calls for an expedition to verify his assertions with two members of the audience volunteering to accompany Summerlee; Edward Malone and British sportsman Lord John Roxton. After arriving in the Amazon they are surprised by Challenger who bullies his way into the exploration party. Using drawings made by a lost American adventurer named Chapel White and Challenger’s own recollections they find the plateau only to be stranded there by rebellious native porters.The novel is written through the eyes of the young journalist. He writes letters home to his newspaper publisher. They are carried to civilization by trusted natives. The story is fast paced with a lot of action as they encounter one amazing creature after another. Professor Challenger is the anti-thesis of Sherlock Holmes; Conan Doyle’s other more widely known character. Where Sherlock is described as tall and angular Challenger is stocky and bullish. Challenger is as egotistical as Sherlock but the great detective is more quietly British whereas the Professor is brash and assertive. Conan Doyle has said that he preferred the Challenger character to his famous detective.I have read some reviews that claim the book is too racist. The depiction of their loyal black assistant is racist, but again this novel was originally written in 1912 and does show the imperialism of that time. I didn’t find it overly disturbing.I enjoyed the novel and recommend it to anyone who is familiar with Arthur Conan Doyle’s style of writing or enjoys H. Rider Haggard and other turn of the Twentieth Century adventure authors.
  • (3/5)
    Professor Challenger's descriptions of a pre-historic culture with animal life somewhere in the jungles of South America is met with derision by the scientific community. It is decided Professor Summerlee, his chief opponent, along with Lord John Roxton and newspaper reporter Edward Malone will accompany him on an expedition to investigate the claim. The tale is told through the eyes of Malone who sends letters back to his editor by a faithful watchman who stays on the opposite side of their destination plateau. They fell a tree to gain entrance to the plateau, but it falls in the gorge, leaving their only connection to the other world a rope which can deliver supplies or letters but not get them back across. They decide to accomplish their mission and then worry about a means to exit the plateau. They encounter a pterodactyl almost immediately. They encounter many dangers and adventures on this well-preserved plateau, including some "half-men, half-ape" creatures which could be the "missing link." I'll leave the rest of the story and adventures for your enjoyment along with their reception upon their return. I'm not a fan of science fiction, but I decided to give this summer AudioSync offering a try since it was authored by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. This tale is very mild in comparison to many of today's science fiction offerings because of the genre's evolution over time. The adventure seemed to appeal to the interest in Darwinian theory at the time of the book's writing. The book was narrated by Glen McCready who seemed to have the perfect voice for Professor Challenger.
  • (4/5)
    When you mention Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, most people will immediately associate him with his great detective, Sherlock Holmes. Holmes's fame overshadows that of another of Conan Doyle's literary creations, Professor Challenger. In the first of his adventures, readers travel with the Professor and his three companions to a remote plateau in South America where dinosaurs and other prehistoric life forms still roam the earth. Just as Holmes needed Watson to record his adventures, Challenger has young newspaper reporter Malone to record the events of the expedition. Adventurer Lord John Roxton and Challenger's antagonist, Professor Summerlee, round out the party.Challenger's personality and physical characteristics reminded me of Professor Emerson of the Amelia Peabody series. H. Rider Haggard's novels inspired some of Amelia Peabody's adventures. It seems that Conan Doyle's Professor Challenger may have also influenced Peters' writing. Malone joined the expedition to prove himself to the woman who rejected his proposal. She believed that she could only love a great man. Apparently she hadn't read Middlemarch to see how well that worked out for Dorothea Casaubon.This novel's title was prophetic in that the world inhabited by the explorers was soon to change with the outbreak of the First World War.
  • (5/5)
    This, in my opinion is Conan Doyle's best work. Professor Challenger presents a more compelling and entertaining character study than does Sherlock Holmes.
  • (2/5)
    Conan Doyle has few greater partisans than me, but this is dreadful. (12.29.06)
  • (4/5)
    I'm a big fan of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, but I didn't realize he'd written a series of science fiction stories as well. This is the first of his Professor Challenger books, and it's thoroughly delightful to read. I won't spoil the plot, but will say there are interesting creatures, vicious battles, and raucous scientific debates aplenty. I'll probably end up reading this one aloud to the kids and may even look for one of the film versions of the story. It's a lot of fun.
  • (5/5)
    I've long been a fan of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes canon, but I had not read any of his other works. So it was a great pleasure to dive into this book and find, in Professor Challenger, as interesting a character as the inimitable detective.For anyone unfortunate enough to have watched the awful travesties that the TV and movie industries have made of this terrific adventure tale, put aside the cartoon caricatures and bountifully bosomed savage jungle queens that pranced across the screen. This book is the real thing, and far better than any film depiction.For one thing, Conan Doyle tells the tale with a wry humor that is deliberate and charming. He takes Victorian stereotypes and stands them on their heads. From the the lovelorn swain whose beloved urges him to go out and do manly deeds for her, and the hidebound scientist who insists that what he's seeing must be rationally explained away, to the boisterous joy that Challenger takes in immodestly demonstrating his superiority to everyone around him; the book is a joyful romp through both Victorian London and a prehistoric jungle.I can't wait to get my hands on the other books starring the brawny and brainy professor.
  • (3/5)
    Well-written and well-told. The characters were engaging and the scenes vivid, and I was definitely pulled in. But the protagonists' decisions at a certain point became disturbing, and I'm not convinced that the author didn't mean to endorse such decisions or the ideologies driving them.
  • (5/5)
    this book is for anyone who has a spirit of adventure!!!!the dinosuar aspect is also really cool so if you love dinosaurs give this book a try!
  • (5/5)
    Read a few times as a teen and then again a few years ago. Rousing good adventure, what ho? Rich commentary on evolution and race, too.
  • (3/5)
    Forget about the science, look beyond the imperialistic racism (simply a "given" at the time this was written), and just go along for the ride, and you'll have fun. The Lost World is what Monty Python characterized as a "ripping yarn."

    I have to admit, though, that once ape men were introduced to the story, it got a bit less fun. In fact, a slaughter is perpetrated which is pretty ugly. But that again, is something which likely wouldn't have been questioned by contemporaries of Conan Doyle's.

    As problematic as the book is, however, it's much better than the cinematic treatments that have been made of it. As a kid, I remember loving the Irwin Allen production, even with its kitchy dinosaurs consisting of iguanas with fins glued on their backs. But the book evidences that Claude Rains was clearly miscast as Professor Challenger. Needed instead someone like Robby Coltrane doing his Hagrid role--except crankier. But if the movie had written the Challenger role as the book portrays him--cantankerous and a bloviating egotist--as a kid I'd probably have been scared by him and stayed away.
    Loved the blowhard as a adult, though!
  • (4/5)
    As you would expect from Mr. Conan Doyle, a rousing story well told. I've seen any number of movies based (some quite loosely) on the story line, so the story was familiar to me, but a very enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    In the days before airplanes and satellite photography, it may just have seemed possible that the vast remoteness of the Amazon might hide a land that time forgot. Arthur Conan Doyle takes us there in The Lost World.Our protagonist is a news reporter who’s looking to make his mark on the world – and to impress his status-conscious amour – by an act of derring-do. He encounters a seemingly mad scientist who insists he has found a land that dinosaurs walk. And then when a scientific dispute explodes into a mission to prove – or disprove – these wild claims, our hero seizes the opportunity, and signs on. What follows is a highly enjoyable and well-written adventure story, with occasional bursts of humor as well. Although this boys’ own adventure theme is perhaps a bit unexpected coming from Conan Doyle, it’s interesting to note the commonalities with the Holmes stories: chiefly, the faith in reason and scientific verification of theories. I read this on my phone during a trip; it’s freely available from Project Gutenberg, and is a perfect ‘just in case’ book to have along when you need a diversion.Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Intriguing tale of formidable Professor Challenger's discovery of Maple White Land and how he convinceshis two colleagues and a love struck journalist to venture back into that terrifying terrain. The conflictingcharacters are memorably contrasted throughout their journey, with elements of both Sherlock and Watson.Story acts as a prologue to Crichton's Jurassic Park with the poisoning attack birds and monstrous dinosaurs.Too much trophy and specimen killing were balanced by the finale flying!Lovely wit:"Lord John merely scratched his scanty locks with the remark that he couldn't put up a fightas he wasn't in the same weight or class."