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UnavailableMiss Lina's Ballerinas and the Wicked Wish
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Miss Lina's Ballerinas and the Wicked Wish

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Miss Lina's Ballerinas and the Wicked Wish

ratings:
4/5 (10 ratings)
Length:
43 pages
17 minutes
Released:
Oct 2, 2012
ISBN:
9781466818231
Format:
Book

Description

Then one sunny day, a guest came to view

Miss Lina's ten dancers plié and tendu.

Miss Lina announced, "This is Mister Brisé.

He'll watch you take class," she explained, "and he may

invite you to dance with the City Ballet."

Miss Lina's ten ballerinas—Christina, Edwina, Sabrina, Justina, Katrina, Bettina, Marina, Regina, Nina, and Tony Farina—are thrilled by the chance to be in the City Ballet's production of Sleeping Beauty. But when nervous Regina is given the undesirable part of the rat while all the other girls gets to dance the waltz, she starts turning green with envy. If only someone would get sick, she wishes, then she would get to dance the waltz, as well!

Released:
Oct 2, 2012
ISBN:
9781466818231
Format:
Book

About the author

Grace Maccarone is a children’s book editor and the author of many books for young readers, including Miss Lina’s Ballerinas, illustrated by Christine Davenier, and the First Grade Friends series, illustrated by Betsy Lewin. She lives in Westchester, New York.

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Reviews

What people think about Miss Lina's Ballerinas and the Wicked Wish

4.0
10 ratings / 10 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Miss Lina's Ballerinas by Grace Maccarone is about a ballet teacher and her eight students. They dance in two rows of four. That is until a ninth student joins the studio!Maccarone's rhymes and word choice brings to mind the rhythm of Bemelman's Madeline. Combined with the soft almost impressionistic sketches by Christine Danvier and the homage is complete.For children starting ballet or fans of Angelina Ballerina, the story uses a number of dancing terms. The children as they go through their day perform a number of different steps.Next the book is good for children who might have a new child in their class. The eight girls are less than thrilled to have an extra person upsetting their routine. They stumble. They crash into each other. They burst into tears. That is until Miss Lina teaches them a new way to cooperate and a new way to dance.Finally there's a small lesson in division. If eight can be divided into two groups of four, how can nine girls be evenly divided? Adults and older children will know the answer but for children just learning their number or just learning fractions or division, it's a good puzzle to figure out along with Miss Lina's students.The book had many re-read requests at my house.
  • (4/5)
    It is about 8 ballerinas, who are used to one another. When another girl joins their dancing school, they become unsure of how to act/ what to do. The girls soon learn that the new student fits right in and makes their group even better. Teachers can use this book as an anti-bullying book, or a book about accepting new students.
  • (4/5)
    Miss Lina's dance studio has eight ballerinas and they all dance in four rows of two. One day a new girl joins the class and this means that there are some modifications to be made. Miss Lina's ballerinas is a good story to teach about acceptance.
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful rhyming story with lovely art reminiscent of Bemelmans.
  • (4/5)
    This is a book about eight little girls who dance in four rows of two. Every where they go they are dancing in their rows. One day a new girl joins the class and the others are not happy about it because it changes their rows. But Miss Lina explains that they can make three rows of three. The girls try it out and they like it. This is a good book about numbers and number patterns.
  • (3/5)
    This is an excellent book to read to children to teach them about change and making accomadations for a new friend.
  • (4/5)
    I love the illustrations, and the rhymes are perfect. Rhymes are a great way to keep a child's attention. The girls learn how to accommodate and accept a new friend. This is a great book for girls who have a hard time adding new people to a group whether it be Girl Scouts, dancing, or anything else.
  • (4/5)
    Miss Lina’s dance studio in Messina was complete with eight dancers named, Katrina, Bettina, Marina, Nina, Christina, Edwina, Sabrina, and Justina. They were all happy and perfect dancers. They practiced all day in 2 rows of 4 at the park, in school, the zoo, the beach, while doing math, and while shopping. One day, a ninth girl joined Miss Lina’s dance studio. Her name was Regina. Regina threw off the girls’ routines, and perfect two rows of four. She made all of the dancers run into each other including Miss Lina. She found a solution; perfect 3 rows of 3. The dancers soon adapted and practiced all the time everywhere they went.
  • (4/5)
    A rhyming book about 8 ballerinas who are friends, who love to dance whenever and where-ever. They dance while they read, and dance while they do math, and even dance while they shop. When Miss Lina introduces them to a new ballerina they don't know how to react. Instead of dancing in four rows of two they now need to learn how to dance in three rows of three. This book can be used when learning how to dance, and even when teaching a little math.
  • (4/5)
    This was a very cute rhyming story along the lines of Madeline. Although it is a very girly book , it could be used to teach some math concepts to younger students regardless of their gender.