Enjoy millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

Read preview

ratings:
3/5 (708 ratings)
Length:
346 pages
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 6, 2015
ISBN:
9786155529887
Format:
Book

Description

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust is a tragic play in two parts: Faust. Der Tragödie erster Teil translated as: Faust: The First Part of the Tragedy) and Faust. Der Tragödie zweiter Teil (Faust: The Second Part of the Tragedy).
Although rarely staged in its entirety, it is the play with the largest audience numbers on German-language stages. Faust is Goethe's most famous work and considered by many to be one of the greatest works of German literature.


The principal characters of Faust Part One include:
Heinrich Faust, a scholar, sometimes said to be based on the real life of Johann Georg Faust, or on Jacob Bidermann's dramatized account of the Legend of the Doctor of Paris, Cenodoxus
Mephistopheles, a Devil (Demon)
Gretchen, Faust's love (short for Margaret; Goethe uses both forms)
Marthe, Gretchen's neighbour
Valentin, Gretchen's brother
Wagner, Faust's famulus


Faust Part One takes place in multiple settings, the first of which is heaven. Mephistopheles makes a bet with God: he says that he can lure God's favourite human being (Faust), who is striving to learn everything that can be known, away from righteous pursuits. The next scene takes place in Faust's study where Faust, despairing at the vanity of scientific, humanitarian and religious learning, turns to magic for the showering of infinite knowledge.


He suspects, however, that his attempts are failing. Frustrated, he ponders suicide, but rejects it as he hears the echo of nearby Easter celebrations begin. He goes for a walk with his assistant Wagner and is followed home by a stray poodle (the term then meant a medium-to-big-size dog, similar to a sheep dog).
In Faust's study, the poodle transforms into the devil (Mephistopheles). Faust makes an arrangement with the devil:


the devil will do everything that Faust wants while he is here on Earth, and in exchange Faust will serve the devil in Hell. Faust's arrangement is that if he is pleased enough with anything the devil gives him that he wants to stay in that moment forever, then he will die in that moment.
When the devil tells Faust to sign the pact with blood, Faust complains that the devil does not trust Faust's word of honor.


In the end, Mephistopheles wins the argument and Faust signs the contract with a drop of his own blood. Faust has a few excursions and then meets Margaret (also known as Gretchen). He is attracted to her and with jewellery and help from a neighbor, Martha, the devil draws Gretchen into Faust's arms. With influence from the devil, Faust seduces Gretchen. Gretchen's mother dies from a sleeping potion, administered by Gretchen to obtain privacy so that Faust could visit her. Gretchen discovers she is pregnant. Gretchen's brother condemns Faust, challenges him and falls dead at the hands of Faust and Mephistopheles.


Gretchen drowns her illegitimate child and is convicted of the murder. Faust tries to save Gretchen from death by attempting to free her from prison. Finding that she refuses to escape, Faust and the devil flee the dungeon, while voices from Heaven announce that Gretchen shall be saved – "Sie ist gerettet" – this differs from the harsher ending of Urfaust – "Sie ist gerichtet!" – "she is condemned."


It was reported that members of the first-night audience familiar with the original Urfaust version cheered on hearing the amendment.

Publisher:
Released:
Apr 6, 2015
ISBN:
9786155529887
Format:
Book

About the author

YAZAR:MURAT UKRAYYetkinlikler:Aynı zamanda bir yazar olan ve yaklaşık genel araştırma konuları ile fizikle ve birleşik alan kramı ile ilgili 2006’dan beri kaleme aldığı yaklaşık 12 eseri bulunan Murat UKRAY, yine bunları kendi kurmuş olduğu çeşitli web siteleri üzerinden, kitaplarını sadece dijital elektronik ortamda, hem düzenli olarak yılda yazmış veya yayınlamış olduğu diğer eserleri de yayın hayatına e-KİTAP ve POD (Print on Demand -talebe göre yayıncılık-) sistemine göre yayın hayatına geçirerek okurlarına sunmayı ilke olarak edinirken; diğer yandan da, projenin SOSYAL yönü olan doğayı korumak amaçlı başlattığı "e-KİTAP PROJESİ" isimli yayıncılık sistemiyle KİTABINI KLASİK SİSTEMLE YAYINLAYAMAYAN "AMATÖR YAZARLAR" için, elektronik ortamda kitap yayıncılığı ile kitaplarını bu sistemle yayınlatmak isteyen PROFESYONEL yayıncılar ve yazarlar için de hemen hemen her çeşit kitabın (MAKALE, AKADEMİK DERS KİTABI, ŞİİR, ROMAN, HİKAYE, DENEME, GÜNLÜK TASLAK) elektronik ortamda yayıncılığının önünü açan e-YAYINCILIĞA 2010 yılı başlarından beri başlamıştır ve halen daha ilgili projeleri yürütmektedir..Aynı zamanda YAZAR KOÇLUĞU ve KUANTUM & BİRLEŞİK ANA KURAMI doğrultusunda, kişisel gelişim uzmanlığı konularında da faaliyet göstermektedir..Çalışma alanları:Köşe yazarlığı yapmak, Profesyonel yazarlık (12 yıldır), Blog yazarlığı, web sitesi kurulumu, PHP Programlama, elektronik ticaret sistemleri, Sanal kütüphane uygulamaları, e-Kitap Uygulamaları ve Yazılımları, Kişisel gelişim, Kuantum mekaniği ve Birleşik Alan teorisi ile ilgili Kuramsal ve Uygulama çalışmaları..


Related to Faust

Read More From Murat Ukray

Related Books

Related Articles

Book Preview

Faust - Murat Ukray

You've reached the end of this preview. Sign up to read more!
Page 1 of 1

Reviews

What people think about Faust

3.0
708 ratings / 11 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Holding off on further review until finished Part II. Currently finding it a little challenging to read but sticking with it as a seminal work (see for example the use of Faustian as a tag).
  • (3/5)
    Dear friend, all theory is gray, and green the golden tree of life.

    What else to say? Towering as an archetype, akin to Hamlet, the Inferno and White Whale -- this tale of pact has been absorbed into a our cultural bones, like an isotope. It is more telling to consider that I listened to Tavener while reading this. I recently gave Pandora a spin but found that I owned more Schnittke than was afforded by my"station" but if I leave such, will I miss those Penn Station ads?

    I will say that I should've read my Norton critical edition, well actually, my wife's copy -- the one I bought for her in Columbus, Ohio ten years ago. I went with a standard Penguin copy and I'm sure many of the historic references were lost for me.

    No one should consider that I regard Faust as emblematic of power politics in the US or a possible Brexit across the water. I'm too feeble for such extrapolation.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Part One of Faust was one of the few books in my life that forced me to put on a pot of coffee and give up a night's sleep to finish it. The young Goethe simply nailed it. When I then got a hold of Part Two (written by the much older Goethe) and sat down with it, I was stunned. His style had completely changed; I never would have guessed it was by the same author. I'm not judging Goethe or the work as a whole, that would be arrogant and ridiculous given his stature as a writer, but simply noting that the experience of reading those two parts of Faust raised serious questions about critical editorial / literary analysis research which makes claims about authorship. It also convinced me that as a writer I should finish what I start. The idea of a long work being as organic and unified as a grapefruit--as John Gardner puts it--instinctively appeals to me.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Goethe is an amazing writer. Faust despairs and wants the death because he can not understand the truth.Dissatisfied with knowing all there is to know about everything, Faust sells his soul to the devil to learn, experience and understand more.It's classic, it's brilliant and full of wisdom and eternal truths.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    yo. evil is evil y'all.

    also I'm a closet Romantic

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    "Último grande poema dos tempos modernos", no dizer de Otto Maria Carpeaux, o Fausto de Goethe está para a modernidade assim como a Divina Comédia de Dante está para a Idade Média. Repletos de referências aos mais diversos campos do saber, os dois textos representam não apenas a obra máxima de seus autores, mas a suma do conhecimento humano e das aspirações espirituais de suas épocas.Escrito e reescrito ao longo de mais de 60 anos, o Fausto integral - compreendendo a primeira e a segunda parte - só seria concluído às vésperas da morte do autor, ocorrida em março de 1832. Já a primeira parte da tragédia (também conhecida como Fausto I), que tem como cerne o pacto de Fausto com Mefistófeles e a conseqüente "tragédia de Margarida", foi elaborada por mais de três décadas, de 1772 a 1806, sendo finalmente publicada, com aprovação de Goethe, em 1808. É esta primeira parte - que pode ser lida também como obra independente - que aqui se publica. A presente edição, bilíngüe, traz a elogiada tradução de Jenny Klabin Segall (livre dos vários erros tipográficos que se haviam acumulado ao longo de sucessivas reedições) acompanhada por uma esclarecedora introdução do professor Marcus Vinicius Mazzari, da Universidade de São Paulo, autor também das notas e comentários.Este volume conta ainda com o chamado "Saco de Valpúrgis" - versos bastante obscenos que deviam integrar a cena "Noite de Valpúrgis" mas que o próprio Goethe, num gesto de autocensura, deixou de fora da edição canônica de 1808, e que são agora publicados, pela primeira vez em nossa língua, em tradução literal de M. V. Mazzari.Ilustrado com desenhos e litografias de Eugène Delacroix, considerado por Goethe o homem certo "para se aprofundar no Fausto e provavelmente criar imagens que ninguém poderia imaginar", este lançamento tem tudo para se tornar a edição de referência do Fausto I em nosso país, a ser seguido em breve pelo Fausto II, também em tradução de Jenny Klabin Segall, com apresentação e notas de M. V. Mazzari.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    (original review, 2004)I’m planning on spending a few weeks on Goethe’s Faust in multiple translations and as much of the German as I can manage, supplemented by hundreds of pages of notes and commentary.I first read the book while in high school in the totally un-annotated Bayard Taylor translation from Modern Library – one of the texts I’m currently reading. I’m still pretty fond of Taylor’s version – with some exceptions generally preferring him to Walter Arndt in the Norton Critical Edition. Taylor’s a relatively local boy – born in Kenneth Square, PA where the town library carries his name.One thing I recall from that ML edition is that a few lines were Bowdlerized with dashes. For example, this song sung by Faust and Mephistopheles with two witches:FAUST ( dancing with the young witch)A lovely dream once came to me;I then beheld an apple-tree,And there two fairest apples shoneThey lured me so, I climbed thereon.THE FAIR ONEApples have been desired by you,Since first in Paradise they grew;And I am moved with joy, to knowThat such within my garden grow.MEPHISTOPHELES ( dancing with the old one)A dissolute dream once came to meTherein I saw a cloven tree,Which had a————————;Yet,——as 'twas, I fancied it.THE OLD ONEI offer here my best saluteUnto the knight with cloven foot!Let him a—————prepare,If him—————————does not scare.I imagined something really obscene was being masked there, but it turns out to be a double entendre only slightly more risqué than the “apples” in the first exchange. Here’s Arndt’s uncensored rendering:FAUST [ dancing with the YOUNG ONE]In a fair dream that once I dreamed;An apple-tree appeared to me,On it two pretty apples gleamed,They beckoned me; I climbed the tree.THE FAIR ONEYou’ve thought such apples very nice,Since Adam’s fall in Paradise.I’m happy to report to you,My little orchard bears them too.MEPHISTOPHELES [ dancing with THE OLD ONE]In a wild dream that once I dreamedI saw a cloven tree, it seemed,It had a black almighty hole;Black as it was, it pleased my soul.THE OLD ONEI welcome to my leafy roofThe baron with the cloven hoof!I hope he’s brought a piston tallTo plug the mighty hole withal.I am reminded in re-reading it how much in common Faust has with the fantasy books that were my staple reading at the time I first encountered it Tolkien, Peake, E. R. Eddison. I was reminded of this by some of the comments today about "The Buried Giant" (disclaimer I’ve not read any Ishiguro). For centuries literature and fantasy were almost synonymous – only in the 18th century did it start to require a kind of warning label.Just about all the operas are adaptations of Faust Part 1, though Arrigo Boito, as I recall, included an episode with Helen of Troy. The dual language Anchor Books edition with Walter Kaufmann’s translation, which seems to be the most commonly available in my neck of the woods, includes only bits of Part 2 from the first and last acts. This may make sense insofar as the edition is intended for students of German, but really makes a hash out of Goethe’s intentions for the work as a whole. I’m really enjoying wrestling with the complexities of Part 2; my recent readings in Greek tragedy helps – Goethe writes a very credible pastiche of the form in the first half of Act 3. [2018 addenda: In Portuguese, our most distinguished Germanist, João Barrento, has already published his Magnum Opus, Faust’s full translation. I haven’t read it yet, but I will].In acquiring various versions of Faust over the years I’ve been mainly interested in those that are complete – the portions editors are the most likely to cut are those that I think would gain the most from multiple viewpoints.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    What does Faust mean? Tough to find too many books more open to interpretation since Columbus landed on American soil. Obvious comparisons with Adam and Eve and the serpent: except the sinner/first one to bite the apple/knowledge-seeker here is a man (yup, feminists have jumped all over that one). interpretations still up for grab: is the sinner a rebel? overly ambitious? is wanting knowledge a deadly sin (ie. pride) -- should Faust be punished? ; or maybe the socialist interpretations are right and Mephistoles symbolizes dissidence -- truth seekers may just be rejecting oppression...down with the elites, closed minds and limited worldviews! Is Mephistopheles the tempter, trying to destroy Faust or is he freeing him? This book was also the center of a cultural war of interpretation in Germany between the Nazis and the spirit of the Weimar....we all know who won that battle... What Goethe was really trying to say, you'll have to decide for yourself...The cultural war (or class war?) is far from over...so read it!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    It's a strange notion, "reviewing" a text that is one of the pillars of German national identity and has had untold hectolitres of ink spilled over it by critics in the last couple of centuries. Maybe the most appropriate question to ask in a place like this is "What does Faust I have to offer the casual modern reader?" Two main things, I think: amazing language and a cracking good yarn.Like Hamlet or the KJV in English, reading Faust through is a bit like joining the dots between dozens of quotations you already know. The language has a very direct appeal to the reader: you don't have to be an expert in 19th century German verse to make sense of it (though I'm sure you would get more out of it if you were). After a few pages you entirely forget what a strange notion it is to be reading a verse drama, and just enjoy the sound of the words.The story isn't as "big" and "epic" as you might imagine. The core story of Gretchen's seduction and fall is told in a very intimate, naturalistic way, and even the big Walpurgisnacht scene is essentially a series of little cameos rather than a big spectacular.
  • (4/5)
    Faust is Goethe’s masterpiece and the heart of his life’s work. He started thinking about it and writing it when he was bored with his studies at University and at the time he quickly cranked out “The Sorrows of Young Werther”, but by contrast he did not complete Faust (Part 1) until decades later, when he was in his fifties. He continued on with Part 2 right up until death at 82.This is not the origin of what has been popularized in so many different ways over the centuries in “selling your soul to the devil” stories, but one of the better versions and certainly a standard reference for the others. It’s the story of not just the condition of Faust’s everlasting soul as he ponders the abyss of suicide, but the condition of man on planet Earth. Jacques Barzun summarizes it well in the introduction to this edition: “…the torment comes from the awareness that man is at once wretched and great. He is wretched because he is a limited, mortal creature; he is great because his mind embraces the whole universe and knows its own wretchedness. No ordinary satisfaction can quench Faust’s desires; forever he sees and wants something beyond. The ultimate bliss would be to feel at one with nature, through knowledge not merely intellectual but emotional also, virtually instinctive; whereas all learning serves but to make Faust more self-conscious and isolated, till he scarcely feels that he lives. Clearly, this defines the situation of modern civilized man, whose increasing knowledge makes him more and more self-critical, anxious, beset by doubts, and hence more and more an alien in the natural world that is his only home.”Epic and grand in scope. Man’s soul, his passions, his fate. Not quiiite as brilliant as I had hoped for from its reputation, but Part 1 is in the “must read” category. Quotes:On beauty:“Often the perfect form appearsOnly when ripened slowly many years.What glitters lives an instant, then is gone;The real for all posterity lives on.”On living life:“Yes, of this truth I am convinced –This is wisdom’s ultimate word:Only he deserves this life in freedomWho daily earns it all anew.”On transience:“Here shall I satisfy my need?What though in thousand volumes I should readThat human beings suffered everywhere,And one perchance was happy, here or there?Why grin, you hollow skull, except to sayThat once your brain, perplexed like mine,Yearning for Truth, pursued the light of day,Then in the dusk went wretchedly astray?”On the passing of youth. :-(“Then give me back those years long pastWhen I could still mature and grow,And when a spring of song welled fastOut of my heart with ceaseless flow,When all the world was veiled in mist,When every bud a miracle concealed,And when I gathered myriad flowersCrowding the valley and the field.Though naught was mine, I had enough in youth,A joy in illusion, a longing for the Truth.Give back the surge of impulse, re-createThat happiness so steeped in pain,The power of love, the strength of hate –Oh, give me back my youth again!”
  • (5/5)
    I'm not sure what to think of the tone of the book over all, as I come away from it with a feeling that Faust is being condemned to the devil for seeking too much knowledge. I feel like there is also something of the old "doctor wanting to be god" joke in here, as well. But I get the feeling that, over time, Faust will come to be one of my favorite characters, along with Voltaire's Candide and Camus' Meursault. And there is definitely something "absurdly" tragic about Goethe's character, as well. Because, to me, Faust isn't just about someone who makes a deal with the devil to make his life better. Rather, it's about someone whose thirst for knowledge is never slaked, who seeks to know everything and what it's like to be everyone. Or, should I say, Faust seeks to be omniscient. (And I have to wonder, is that necessarily a bad thing? Would the world be worse off if we knew just what it was like to be the millionaire in his mansion, or the low class beggar in the city?) But to get back on track: at the same time, he realizes he is merely only a human, and he is burdened, depressed, and frenzied by the knowledge that he probably can never know everything--and there is something so full of humility, so pathetically human about his situation. This leads him to not just "make a deal" with the devil, but to acquiesce to Mephistopheles as a sort of last resort. Why not, if there is no other way he can gain omniscient knowledge, anyway? Of course, Mephistopheles makes him become enamored with a woman, and this love transports Faust, and makes him finally feel like he has gained everything he's ever wanted. Where am I going with this? I don't know, because I don't quite know what Goethe was going for, either. But Faust's words say it all the better:"And here, poor fool! with all my loreI stand, no wiser than before"