Find your next favorite book

Become a member today and read free for 30 days
Aesop Fables: {Illustrated}

Aesop Fables: {Illustrated}

Read preview

Aesop Fables: {Illustrated}

ratings:
4/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
374 pages
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 2, 2015
ISBN:
9786155529450
Format:
Book

Description

  Aesop embodies an epigram not uncommon in human history; his fame is all the more deserved because he never deserved it. The firm foundations of common sense, the shrewd shots at uncommon sense, that characterise all the Fables, belong not him but to humanity. In the earliest human history whatever is authentic is universal: and whatever is universal is anonymous.


  In such cases there is always some central man who had first the trouble of collecting them, and afterwards the fame of creating them. He had the fame; and, on the whole, he earned the fame. There must have been something great and human, something of the human future and the human past, in such a man: even if he only used it to rob the past or deceive the future. The story of Arthur may have been really connected with the most fighting Christianity of falling Rome or with the most heathen traditions hidden in the hills of Wales. But the word "Mappe" or "Malory" will always mean King Arthur; even though we find older and better origins than the Mabinogian; or write later and worse versions than the "Idylls of the King."


  The nursery fairy tales may have come out of Asia with the Indo-European race, now fortunately extinct; they may have been invented by some fine French lady or gentleman like Perrault: they may possibly even be what they profess to be. But we shall always call the best selection of such tales "Grimm's Tales": simply because it is the best collection.


  The historical Aesop, in so far as he was historical, would seem to have been a Phrygian slave, or at least one not to be specially and symbolically adorned with the Phrygian cap of liberty. He lived, if he did live, about the sixth century before Christ, in the time of that Croesus whose story we love and suspect like everything else in Herodotus. There are also stories of deformity of feature and a ready ribaldry of tongue: stories which (as the celebrated Cardinal said) explain, though they do not excuse, his having been hurled over a high precipice at Delphi. It is for those who read the Fables to judge whether he was really thrown over the cliff for being ugly and offensive, or rather for being highly moral and correct.


  But there is no kind of doubt that the general legend of him may justly rank him with a race too easily forgotten in our modern comparisons: the race of the great philosophic slaves. Aesop may have been a fiction like Uncle Remus: he was also, like Uncle Remus, a fact. It is a fact that slaves in the old world could be worshipped like Aesop, or loved like Uncle Remus. It is odd to note that both the great slaves told their best stories about beasts and birds.


  But whatever be fairly due to Aesop, the human tradition called Fables is not due to him. This had gone on long before any sarcastic freedman from Phrygia had or had not been flung off a precipice; this has remained long after. It is to our advantage, indeed, to realise the distinction; because it makes Aesop more obviously effective than any other fabulist. Grimm's Tales, glorious as they are, were collected by two German students. And if we find it hard to be certain of a German student, at least we know more about him than We know about a Phrygian slave. The truth is, of course, that Aesop's Fables are not Aesop's fables, any more than Grimm's Fairy Tales were ever Grimm's fairy tales. But the fable and the fairy tale are things utterly distinct. There are many elements of difference; but the plainest is plain enough. There can be no good fable with human beings in it. There can be no good fairy tale without them.

Publisher:
Released:
Apr 2, 2015
ISBN:
9786155529450
Format:
Book

About the author

According to legend, Aesop (620–564 BCE) spent much of his early life as a slave before earning his freedom with cleverness. No trace of his original writings survives, but Aesop’s fables were transcribed by others and passed down through the ages. In 1484 the first printed edition spurred a wave of translations around the world. Today his tales of moral instruction are some of the most cherished stories in the world.


Related to Aesop Fables

Read More From Murat Ukray

Related Books

Related Articles

Book Preview

Aesop Fables - Aesop

Aesop Fables {Illustrated}

By

Aesop

Translation by Vernon Jones

Illustrated by Murat Ukray & Arthur Rackham

ILLUSTRATED &

PUBLISHED BY

e-KİTAP PROJESİ & CHEAPEST BOOKS

www.cheapestboooks.com

www.faccebook.com/EkitapProjesi

Copyright, 2014 by e-Kitap Projesi

Istanbul

ISBN: 978-6155529-4-50

AESOP FABLES

BY

A NEW TRANSLATION

BY

V. S. VERNON JONES

1912 EDITION

Table of Contents

Aesop Fables {Illustrated}

Introduction

The Fox And the Grapes

The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs

The Cat And the Mice

The Mischievous Dog

The Charcoal Burner And the Fuller

The Mice In Council

The Bat And the Weasels

The Dog And the Sow

The Fox And the Crow

The Horse And the Groom

The Wolf And the Lamb

The Peacock And the Crane

The Cat And the Birds

The Spendthrift And the Swallow

The Old Woman And the Doctor

The Moon And Her Mother

Mercury And the Woodman

The Ass The Fox And the Lion

The Lion And the Mouse

The Crow And the Pitcher

The Boys And the Frogs

The North Wind And the Sun

The Mistress And Her Servants

The Goods And the Ills

The Hares And the Frogs

The Fox And the Stork

The Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing

The Stag In the Ox Stall

The Milkmaid And Her Pail

The Dolphins the Whales And the Sprat

The Fox And the Monkey

The Ass And the Lap Dog

The Fir Tree And the Bramble

The Frogs’ Complaint Against the Sun

The Dog the Cock And the Fox

The Gnat And the Bull

The Bear And the Travellers

The Slave And the Lion

The Flea And the Man

The Bee And Jupiter

The Oak And the Reeds

The Blind Man And the Cub

The Boy And the Snails

The Apes And the Two Travellers

The Ass And His Burdens

The Shepherd’s Boy And the Wolf

The Fox And the Goat

The Fisherman And the Sprat

The Boasting Traveller

The Crab And His Mother

The Ass And His Shadow

The Farmer And His Sons

The Dog And the Cook

The Monkey As King

The Thieves And the Cock

The Farmer And Fortune

Jupiter And the Monkey

Father And Sons

The Lamp

The Owl And the Birds

The Ass In the Lion’s Skin

The She Goats And Their Beards

The Old Lion

The Boy Bathing

The Quack Frog

The Swollen Fox

The Mouse the Frog And the Hawk

The Boy And the Nettles

The Peasant And the Apple Tree

The Jackdaw And the Pigeons

Jupiter And the Tortoise

The Dog In the Manger

The Two Bags

The Oxen And the Axletrees

The Boy And the Filberts

The Frogs Asking For a King

The Olive Tree And the Fig Tree

The Lion And the Boar

The Walnut Tree

The Man And the Lion

The Tortoise And the Eagle

The Kid On the Housetop

The Fox Without a Tail

The Vain Jackdaw

The Traveller And His Dog

The Shipwrecked Man And the Sea

The Wild Boar And the Fox

Mercury And the Sculptor

The Fawn And His Mother

The Fox And the Lion

The Eagle And His Captor

The Blacksmith And His Dog

The Stag At the Pool

The Dog And the Shadow

Mercury And the Tradesmen

The Mice And the Weasels

The Peacock And Juno

The Bear And the Fox

The Ass And the Old Peasant

The Ox And the Frog

The Man And the Image

Hercules And the Waggoner

The Pomegranate the Apple Tree And the Bramble

The Lion the Bear And the Fox

The Blackamoor

The Two Soldiers And the Robber

The Lion And the Wild Ass

The Man And the Satyr

The Image Seller

The Eagle And the Arrow

The Rich Man And the Tanner

The Wolf the Mother And Her Child

The Old Woman And the Wine Jar

The Lioness And the Vixen

The Viper And the File

The Cat And the Cock

The Hare And the Tortoise

The Soldier And His Horse

The Oxen And the Butchers

The Wolf And the Lion

The Sheep the Wolf And the Stag

The Lion And the Three Bulls

The Horse And His Rider

The Goat And the Vine

The Two Pots

The Old Hound

The Clown And the Countryman

The Lark And the Farmer

The Lion And the Ass

The Prophet

The Hound And the Hare

The Lion the Mouse And the Fox

The Trumpeter Taken Prisoner

The Wolf And the Crane

The Eagle the Cat And the Wild Sow

The Wolf And the Sheep

The Tunny Fish And the Dolphin

The Three Tradesmen

The Mouse And the Bull

The Hare And the Hound

The Town Mouse And the Country Mouse

The Lion And the Bull

The Wolf the Fox And the Ape

The Eagle And the Cocks

The Escaped Jackdaw

The Farmer And the Fox

Venus And the Cat

The Crow And the Swan

The Stag With One Eye

The Fly And the Draught Mule

The Cock And the Jewell

The Wolf And the Shepherd

The Farmer And the Stork

The Changer And the Miller

The Grasshopper And the Owl

The Grasshopper And the Ants

The Farmer And the Viper

The Two Frogs

The Cobbler Turned Doctor

The Ass the Cock And the Lion

The Belly And the Members

The Bald Man And the Fly

The Ass And the Wolf

The Monkey And the Camel

The Sick Man And the Doctor

The Travellers And the Plane Tree

The Flea And the Ox

The Birds the Beasts And the Bat

The Man And His Two Sweethearts

The Eagle the Jackdaw And the Shepherd

The Wolf And the Boy

The Miller His Son And Their Ass

The Stag And the Vine

The Lamb Chased By a Wolf

The Archer And the Lion

The Wolf And the Goat

The Sick Stag

The Ass And the Mule

Brother And Sister

The Heifer And the Ox

The Kingdom of the Lion

The Ass And His Driver

The Lion And the Hare

The Wolves And the Dogs

The Bull And the Calf

The Trees And the Axe

The Astronomer

The Labourer And the Snake

The Cage Bird And the Bat

The Ass And His Purchaser

The Kid And the Wolf

The Debtor And His Sow

The Bald Huntsman

The Herdsman And the Lost Bull

The Mule

The Hound And the Fox

The Father And His Daughters

The Thief And the Innkeeper

The Pack Ass And the Wild Ass

The Ass And His Masters

The Pack Ass the Wild Ass And the Lion

The Ant

The Frogs And the Well

The Crab And the Fox

The Fox And the Grasshopper

The Farmer His Boy And the Rooks

The Ass And the Dog

The Ass Carrying the Image

The Athenian And the Theban

The Goatherd And the Goat

The Sheep And the Dog

The Shepherd And the Wolf

The Lion Jupiter And the Elephant

The Pig And the Sheep

The Gardener And His Dog

The Rivers And the Sea

The Lion In Love

The Bee Keeper

The Wolf And the Horse

The Bat the Bramble And the Seagull

The Dog And the Wolf

The Wasp And the Snake

The Eagle And the Beetle

The Fowler And the Lark

The Fisherman Piping

The Weasel And the Man

The Ploughman the Ass And the Ox

Demades And His Fable

The Monkey And the Dolphin

The Crow And the Snake

The Dogs And the Fox

The Nightingale And the Hawk

The Rose And the Amaranth

The Man the Horse the Ox And the Dog

The Wolves the Sheep And the Ram

The Swan

The Snake And Jupiter

The Wolf And His Shadow

Mercury And the Man Bitten By an Ant

The Wily Lion

The Parrot And the Cat

The Stag And the Lion

The Impostor

The Dogs And the Hides

The Lion the Fox And the Ass

The Fowler the Partridge And the Cock

The Gnat And the Lion

The Farmer And His Dogs

The Eagle And the Fox

The Butcher And His Customers

Hercules And Minerva

The Fox Who Served a Lion

The Quack Doctor

The Lion the Wolf And the Fox

Hercules And Plutus

The Fox And the Leopard

The Fox And the Hedgehog

The Crow And the Raven

The Witch

The Old Man And Death

The Miser

The Foxes And the River

The Horse And the Stag

The Fox And the Bramble

The Fox And the Snake

The Lion the Fox And the Stag

The Man Who Lost His Spade

The Partridge And the Fowler

The Runaway Slave

The Hunter And the Woodman

The Serpent And the Eagle

The Rouge And the Oracle

The Horse And the Ass

The Dog Chasing a Wolf

Grief And His Due

The Hawk the Kite And the Pigeons

The Woman And the Farmer

Prometheus And the Making of Man

The Swallow And the Crow

The Hunter And the Horseman

The Goatherd And the Wild Goats

The Nightingale And the Swallow

The Traveller And Fortune

{ILLUSTRATED}

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY

Murat UKRAY & Arthur RACKHAM {e-Kitap Projesi}

Introduction

Aesop embodies an epigram not uncommon in human history; his fame is all the more deserved because he never deserved it. The firm foundations of common sense, the shrewd shots at uncommon sense, that characterise all the Fables, belong not him but to humanity. In the earliest human history whatever is authentic is universal: and whatever is universal is anonymous. In such cases there is always some central man who had first the trouble of collecting them, and afterwards the fame of creating them. He had the fame; and, on the whole, he earned the fame. There must have been something great and human, something of the human future and the human past, in such a man: even if he only used it to rob the past or deceive the future. The story of Arthur may have been really connected with the most fighting Christianity of falling Rome or with the most heathen traditions hidden in the hills of Wales. But the word Mappe or Malory will always mean King Arthur; even though we find older and better origins than the Mabinogian; or write later and worse versions than the Idylls of the King. The nursery fairy tales may have come out of Asia with the Indo-European race, now fortunately extinct; they may have been invented by some fine French lady or gentleman like Perrault: they may possibly even be what they profess to be. But we shall always call the best selection of such tales Grimm's Tales: simply because it is the best collection.

The historical Aesop, in so far as he was historical, would seem to have been a Phrygian slave, or at least one not to be specially and symbolically adorned with the Phrygian cap of liberty. He lived, if he did live, about the sixth century before Christ, in the time of that Croesus whose story we love and suspect like everything else in Herodotus. There are also stories of deformity of feature and a ready ribaldry of tongue: stories which (as the celebrated Cardinal said) explain, though they do not excuse, his having been hurled over a high precipice at Delphi. It is for those who read the Fables to judge whether he was really thrown over the cliff for being ugly and offensive, or rather for being highly moral and correct. But there is no kind of doubt that the general legend of him may justly rank him with a race too easily forgotten in our modern comparisons: the race of the great philosophic slaves. Aesop may have been a fiction like Uncle Remus: he was also, like Uncle Remus, a fact. It is a fact that slaves in the old world could be worshipped like Aesop, or loved like Uncle Remus. It is odd to note that both the great slaves told their best stories about beasts and birds.

But whatever be fairly due to Aesop, the human tradition called Fables is not due to him. This had gone on long before any sarcastic freedman from Phrygia had or had not been flung off a precipice; this has remained long after. It is to our advantage, indeed, to realise the distinction; because it makes Aesop more obviously effective than any other fabulist. Grimm's Tales, glorious as they are, were collected by two German students. And if we find it hard to be certain of a German student, at least we know more about him than We know about a Phrygian slave. The truth is, of course,

You've reached the end of this preview. Sign up to read more!
Page 1 of 1

Reviews

What people think about Aesop Fables

3.9
21 ratings / 33 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I always loved reading these fables when I was a kid, and they certainly permeated their way through my childhood even up until now. While they may seem a little silly and/or difficult to understand, there is certainly a message to be taken away from all of them if you are willing to think outside of the box.
  • (4/5)
    It would be a benefit to mankind if these morals were taught today. Instead, everything seems to be nonjudgmental. "Who are you to tell me I'm wrong?!!"
  • (3/5)
    Not the best book of fables in the whole wide world, but it does have its charm and its certainly brings back memories. There are lots of tales that I have heard before when I was a kid, several of them actually quite popular. However, this book goes straight to the point. You know the tale of the Turtle and the Hare, which has already been rewritten by several different authors, even having animated movies about it? Well, this book tells the story in half a page. Which isn't so bad, really. It's actually interesting to read those stories in a short format, with the emphasis on the story's lesson. A nice read for grown-ups, a good thing to give the children something to think about.
  • (3/5)
    Very, very simple anecdotes. Any fables that have been turned into lengthier morality tales such as "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" have been beefed up considerably.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first read through of Aesop's Fables in its entirety. Obviously I have encountered many of these fables before individually but was somewhat surprised by how dark they are. Aesop as a freedman was brilliant at seeing into the psyche of humankind. The Fables have held up well over the last 2500 years. I found it odd that the translator used the names of the Roman gods as opposed to the original greek gods.
  • (4/5)
    Some were great, some were dull (or even rather mean), and some were in-between. Overall, not super crazy about it, but glad to have read the collection of them.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this one better than "Grimm's Fairy Tales" because A) they're all super short, great for reading a teeny bit at a time and B) the language is much more understandable. But like "Grimm's Fairy Tales", the stories get repetitive after a while. They're all moral lessons, and they fall under three categories: evil is its own ruin, be honest and don't lie, don't be vain/greedy/prideful. Consequences of failing to heed lessons A, B, and C will result in you being eaten by a tiger 90% of the time.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this chapter book because of the moral messages learned from each short fable and how I could remember a majority of these stories from my own childhood. The moral lessons learned from these stories stem from always telling the truth, the idea that slow and steady will win the race, and to not judge someone by their appearance. As a child I remembered reading a great majority of these and enjoyed being able to reinterpret what was being said. Although the version I read did not contain illustrations, I did enjoy how the words came to life on the page. As one reads these stories, they can be illustrated in the reader's mind. The big idea of this chapter book is to give a recorded source of the oral stories told so as to teach moral lessons to children and adults.
  • (4/5)
    The Boy Who Cried Wolf is a great story for young children. It has a very important lesson which is not to lie. The boy "cried wolf" and said there was a wolf when there was not. Then, when there actually was no one believed him. This is important for young children to learn. I really loved this story because of the lesson. I also enjoyed it because it was interesting and made the reader want to keep reading. The story was also great because it was a good length. It was not too long so it was not boring, but it also was not too short. The last thing I liked was that the story was well written. From the writing, I could envision the boy and what was happening in the story. This was a great book!
  • (3/5)
    I read this book over the course of maybe a year reading generally one fable a day. Like a lesson of the day. Some were great, some kind of goofy but I found overall the many lessons imparted as valid as most religious doctrine.Aesop himself is somewhat of a mysterious person of Greece much like Homer with only conjecture of who he was and how he put together this book of wisdom using the animated figures to deliver the message. In any event I found it intriguing to read them all and experience the lessons of such an ancient time that can have such relevance today.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:This book is a series of short, and a little weird, stories with a little bit of proverb advice at the end of each story.Personal Reaction:I think this is an outstanding set of fables and short stories. I found this to be very entertaining and a little bit of an eye-opener. Reading some of these stories to my children was entertaining to them and entertaining to me to watch their reactions. A lot of the proverb advice I had to explain a little deeper for my oldest to understand them, but all in all a very good and entertaining read.Classroom Extension:1. These stories can be intergraded in many fashion of ways. I think it would be ideal to use as a "brain-break" in between lessons.2. This book can be used as a good way to bring literature into the classroom and can be a good way to introduce fables, proverbs, and short stories.
  • (3/5)
    Another reviewer said it best when stating that he enjoyed Aesop's Fables for the lessons rather than the storytelling. I was surprised to see how many of today's maxims originated from this collection of stories, and even moreso to hear that they had been penned in the 5th century BC. Definitely worth a read.
  • (5/5)
    This was the first time I ever read any of Aesop's Fables and I loved each little story. These nuggets of morality hidden within tiny stories truly makes one think about their actions towards themselves and toward others. It is an excellent book to read to your little ones in hopes of helping them understand decency towards others.

    I would recommend this book to others.
  • (1/5)
    Nothing in it is true - though some argue that it has 'truths' (of a sort). I gave it one star...
  • (4/5)
    Yet another I should reread, although so many of the fables are so familiar. Who could forget the fox and the grapes? The lessons in Aesop are still worthwhile today.
  • (3/5)


    Enjoyed the ones I was familiar with, many of them seemed repetitious. Overall a book everyone should and usually are familiar with.
  • (3/5)


    Enjoyed the ones I was familiar with, many of them seemed repetitious. Overall a book everyone should and usually are familiar with.
  • (5/5)
    A collection of the greatest stories with a moral attribute ever. Attributed by Aristotle as the best. Transformed into verse by Socrates, these stories captured the imagination of the greatest thinkers in human history, and continue to do so today. No child stands to be harmed by learning these tales, in fact, and argument could be made for the opposite effect. The most highly recommended literature for children by indisputable sources.
  • (4/5)
    This book contains 82 of Aesop's fables. Many of these short stories with a moral of the story at the end, I have never heard before. Many, many of these early stories have morals that I never knew the origin of - A stitch in time saves nine, honesty is the best policy. These moral little sayings have withstood the test of time.
  • (4/5)
    Collections of these short tales with a moral were among the very first works--after the Bible--to be published on the printing press. It's amazing how many catch phrases come from these fables: Honesty is the best policy. Don't count your chickens before they've hatched. Look before you leap. Aesop himself, like Homer, may never have existed in history. Tradition makes him a slave in Asia Minor, possibly of Ethiopian descent, born in 620 and eventually freed for his cleverness becomes a counselor to kings and companion to philosophers. Herodotus, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch, Horace all mentioned Aesop and his tales, and the earliest surviving collection is from the first century. They're been used by orators and in primers ever since, and definitely should be read in the interest of cultural legacy. They're short. One of the most famous ones is only three lines:Driven by hunger, a fox tried to reach some grapes hanging high on the vine but was unable to, although he leaped with all his strength. As he went away, the fox remarked, 'Oh, you aren't even ripe yet! I don't need any sour grapes.' People who speak disparagingly of things that they cannot attain would do well to apply this story to themselves.To be honest, I tend to think these are best read by children, preferably in an illustrated edition. There's really no authoritative canon for the fables, the two primary collections from antiquity consist of only a few hundred tales. A lot of translations use antiquated language, or put the pithy tales into rather elaborated verse, or cut the moral, so you might want to scan various editions before deciding which to get. They're worth knowing, if only to be able to recognize where so many familiar stories and phrases come from.
  • (5/5)
    Dad used to read these to us when we were children.
  • (3/5)
    Read this for the "1001" books and they're good little stories with great moral messages, but I found it hard to read them straight thru as a whole book. A few of the stories I even got a bit confused on because I kept mixing them up with others that were similar. I thought a few times "didn't I just read this this one?" But it was a good read and a keeper, and at least I finished it!
  • (3/5)
    Various fables by Aesop are presented in a collection.The book would be useful in discussing morals and fables with kids.
  • (5/5)
    I like Aesop's fables because of the simple stories that relate back to a moral. I don’t like some of the stories' because of the cruelness of some of them. These stories have been retold many times but still possess the same stories with the morals being connected.
  • (4/5)
    Every few years I enjoy rereading Aesop’s Fables. When I come across a different edition with wonderful, new-to-me illustrations, I just can’t help myself. The morals of the Fables are occasionally contradictory, that’s where they’re most interesting in fact. For example, some tales seem to indicate that opposites attract and can help one another; in other instances alike things are attracted to one another and those things that are different are dangerous and can cause them harm; still, one has to fight the urge, because they are so amusing, to agree with all of Aesop’s “lessons” on all points. The best thing you can get from it as a child is that the world can be a contradictory place and that the best thing to do is ask questions about the truth of any given assertion or act. Aesop, if he did exist, seems like he could probably move from being a skeptic to being paranoid pretty easily. It’s good to read the tales with a dose of good humor.
  • (4/5)
    This collection of fables is great for children. There are a lot of good ones but there are definitely some that are lacking. Some of the fables even contradict others ones. But as a classic, every one should read it at least once. There are many lines worth quoting.
  • (4/5)
    The Tortoise and the Hare, the Grasshopper and the Ant, and dozens more of the delightful creatures that have been entertaining and instructing people for thousands of years. The storyteller Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, far away from us in time and distance. But his clever little stories have as much meaning for us today as they did when he first told them so long ago...
  • (5/5)
    Who does not like Aesop's Fables? Come on.
  • (4/5)
    Quick and short are the ancient greek moralistic tales. This is a beautifully illustrated collection of a few of them. I read "The Wolf and The Crane". The story of a greedy wolf who overeats and starts choking on a bone. He then begs the animals to help him saying he'll do anything for it. A crane does, sticking her long beak down and drawing out the bone. She then asks for her reward and he states that she should be grateful for him not biting her head off when she stuck it down his throat. The moral: he who live on expectations are sure to be disappointed.
  • (3/5)
    The translated or retold stories are straight-forward, but the editor often chose to use English proverbs as his "Applications", some of which were not particularly applicable; it seems redundant to use an idiomatic phrase to explain a fable.