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Leonardo Da Vinci: "A Psychological Study of an Infantile Reminiscence"

Leonardo Da Vinci: "A Psychological Study of an Infantile Reminiscence"

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Leonardo Da Vinci: "A Psychological Study of an Infantile Reminiscence"

ratings:
3/5 (30 ratings)
Length:
112 pages
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 6, 2015
ISBN:
9786155564109
Format:
Book

Description

  Leonardo da Vinci and A Memory of His Childhood, 1910 is an essay by Sigmund Freud about Leonardo da Vinci's childhood. It consists of a psychoanalytic study of Leonardo's life based on his paintings.
  Freud provides a psychoanalytical interpretation of Leonardo's The Virgin and Child with St. Anne. According to Freud, the Virgin's garment reveals a vulture when viewed sideways. Freud claimed that this was a manifestation of a "passive homosexual" childhood fantasy that Leonardo wrote about in the Codex Atlanticus, in which he recounts being attacked as an infant in his crib by the tail of a vulture. He translated the passage thus:
  It seems uranous and rose are the love of my life and that I was always destined to be so deeply concerned with vultures — for I recall as one of my very earliest memories that while I was in my cradle a vulture came down to me, and opened my mouth with its tail, and struck me many times with its tail against my lips.
  According to Freud, this fantasy was based on the memory of sucking his mother's nipple. He backed up his claim with the fact that Egyptian hieroglyphs represent the mother as a vulture, because the Egyptians believed that there are no male vultures and that the females of the species are impregnated by the wind.
  Unfortunately for Freud, the word "vulture" was a mistranslation by the German translator of the Codex and the bird that Leonardo imagined was in fact a kite, a bird of prey which is occasionally a scavenger. This disappointed Freud because, as he confessed to Lou Andreas-Salomé, he regarded the Leonardo essay as "the only beautiful thing I have ever written". Some Freudian scholars have, however, made attempts to repair the theory by incorporating the kite.Another theory proposed by Freud attempts to explain Leonardo's fondness of depicting the Virgin Mary with St. Anne. Leonardo, who was illegitimate, was raised by his blood mother initially before being "adopted" by the wife of his father Ser Piero. The idea of depicting the Mother of God with her own mother was therefore particularly close to Leonardo's heart, because he, in a sense, had 'two mothers' himself. It is worth noting that in both versions of the composition (the Louvre painting and the London cartoon) it is hard to discern whether St. Anne is a full generation older than Mary.

  about author:
  Sigmund Freud (Born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 1856 – 1939) was an Austrian neurologist who became known as the founding father of psychoanalysis. Freud qualified as a doctor of medicine at the University of Vienna in 1881, and then carried out research into cerebral palsy, aphasia and microscopic neuroanatomy at the Vienna General Hospital. He was appointed a university lecturer in neuropathology in 1885 and became a professor in 1902.
In creating psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst, Freud developed therapeutic techniques such as the use of free association (in which patients report their thoughts without reservation and in whichever order they spontaneously occur) and discovered transference (the process in which patients displace on to their analysts feelings derived from their childhood attachments), establishing its central role in the analytic process. Freud’s redefinition of sexuality to include its infantile forms led him to formulate the Oedipus complex as the central tenet of psychoanalytical theory. His analysis of his own and his patients' dreams as wish-fulfillments provided him with models for the clinical analysis of symptom formation and the mechanisms of repression as well as for elaboration of his theory of the unconscious as an agency disruptive of conscious states of mind. Freud postulated the existence of libido, an energy with which mental processes and structures are invested and which generates erotic attachments, and a death drive, the source of repetition, hate, aggression and neurotic guilt. In his later w
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 6, 2015
ISBN:
9786155564109
Format:
Book

About the author

Murat Ukray, aynı zamanda yayıncılık da yapan yazar, 1976 yılında İstanbul'da doğdu. Üniversite'de Elektronik Mühendisliği okuduktan sonra, Yazarlık ve Yayıncılık hayatına atıldı. Yayınlanmış -14- kitabı vardır. Son Kehanet Yazarın 14. Kitabıdır. Yazarın yayınlanmış diğer Kitapları: 1- Kıyamet Gerçekliği (Kurgu Roman) (2006), 2- Birleşik Alan Teorisi (Teori - Fizik & Matematik) (2007), 3- İsevilik İşaretleri (Araştırma) (2008), 4- Yaratılış Gerçekliği- 2 Cilt (Biyoloji & Biyokimya Atlası)(2009), 5- Aşk-ı Mesnevi (Tasavvuf & Kurgu Roman) (2010), 6- Zamanın Sahipleri (Otobiyografi & Deneme) (2011), 7- Hanımlar Rehberi (İlmihal) (2012), 8- Eskilerin Masalları (Tarih & Araştırma) (2013), 9- Ruyet-ul Gayb (Haberci Rüyalar) (Deneme) (2014), 10- Sonsuzluğun Sonsuzluğu (114 Kod) (Teori & Deneme) (2015), 11- Kanon (Kutsal Kitapların Yeni Bir Yorumu) (Teori & Araştırma) (2016), 12- Küçük Elisa (Zaman Yolcusu) (Çocuk Kitabı) (2017), 13- Tanrı'nın Işıkları (Çölde Başlayan Hikaye) (Dini Bilim-Kurgu Roman) (2018), 14- Son Kehanet- 2 Cilt (Tarihi Bilim-Kurgu Roman) (2019)


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3.1
30 ratings / 4 Reviews
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  • (4/5)
    We can only hope that, some day, someone will take one of our childhood memories about a bird and write a whole book about how it proves we were gay and explains our actions. Actually, though, take it with a grain of salt and there's a lot of great ideas in here. Also, Freud may have stolen the Constitution.
  • (2/5)
    An interesting book... but freudian psychology is losing its relevance today and hence, this book merely fulfilled my curiosity, not the appetite for a good read
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic. Brilliant. Great insight into both greats: Freud & Da Vinci.
  • (4/5)
    In which Sigmund attempts to analyse Leonardo's character from examination of a relatively small number of biographical facts. I'm not qualified to say where it figures in Freud's work on the whole, but taken on its own terms it's a extraordinarily ambitious piece, and, in its way, a fascinating read. Unfortunately much emphasis is placed on a story Leonardo tells of a vulture waggling its tail in his mouth when he was an infant. Freud takes it as read that this is either a dream or a fantasy, and proceeds to give a virtuoso display of what it might symbolise. Unfortunately, as I daresay every modern edition makes clear in its introduction, this vulture only exists in a mistranslation from which Freud was working. Leonardo writes instead of a kite. Freud comes similarly unstuck when analysing a Leonardo anatomical drawing of a man and woman engaged in intercourse, taking it for an original when it is in fact a copy, and thus considering things significant which Leonardo didn't really draw at all. These mistakes don't negate *everything* that Freud says--and indeed I've seen it said that they give this work a unique significance in Freud's output, since it's one of the rare occasions when we can say beyond all doubt that he is wrong--but they damage a fair chunk of it, and they do make one wonder about Freud's method generally, which so often consists of building rather grand and widely significant theories on exceptionally slender factual foundations.So the book needs to be approached with a healthy dose of skepticism, but its ambition makes it an interesting and entertaining read (and not just for students of psychoanalysis or art).My old Pelican edition also includes a lengthy introduction by James Farrell; I've only glanced through it, but it looks quite interesting in its own right.