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From the Publisher

This practical guide shows how we can contribute to conserving water, our most precious resource, in our home and garden.
Waterwise House and Garden takes a planned approach to saving water in the home using different household reticulation options including the use of rainwater tanks and recycling greywater. It shows how to eliminate unnecessary watering in the garden by working with nature to create a garden that is both enjoyable and sensitive to the environment.
It explains the science behind survival strategies of plants in dry conditions, shows how soil and water interact, and demonstrates how to improve the soil in your garden. Included is an extensive list of native and exotic plants that are tolerant to dry conditions in both tropical and temperate climates.
The result is an accessible and informative resource guaranteed to help you reduce the environmental impact of everyday living, and dramatically reduce your household water bill in the process.
Shortlisted in TAFE Vocational Education category in the 2003 Awards for Excellence in Educational Publishing.
Published: Landlinks Press on
ISBN: 9780643099791
List price: $25.95
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