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From the Publisher

A comprehensive look at the private equity arena

With private equity differing from other asset classes, it requires a whole new approach for those trained in more traditional investments such as stocks and bonds. But with the right guidance, you can gain a firm understanding of everything private equity has to offer.

This reliable resource provides a comprehensive view of private equity by describing the current state of research and best practices in this arena. Issues addressed include the structure of private equity funds and fundraising, the financial and real returns of private equity, and the structure of private equity investments with investees, to name a few.

Discusses the role of private equity in today's financial environment Provides international perspectives on private equity Details the regulation of private equity markets

Filled with in-depth insights and expert advice, this book will provide you with a better understanding of private equity structures and put you in a better position to measure and analyze their performance.

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9780470579534
List price: $95.00
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