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From the Publisher

An executive coach shows you how better communication leads to productivity and profitability

Communication is the key to success when you manage other people. But it's not enough to just communicate; you have to communicate in the right way to get the results you want from your people and teams. In Don't Be That Boss, renowned executive coach Mark Wiskup shows you how to communicate effectively with colleagues and workers to create a healthy, productive, happy work environment.

The story follows two leaders through a typical workday and all their typical communications-including meetings, conferences, one-on-one discussions, break room banter, phone calls, and even emails. Based on real situations you'll probably recognize, you'll watch as two committed, intelligent people take different approaches to communication and reap very different results. Along the way, you'll realize what good communication is, how it works, and how it makes your business better in virtually every way.

Written by an experienced communications coach who works with Fortune 500 clients, CEOs and managers across the country Shows that how you communicate in the office is just as important as what you communicate Explains why excellent communication skills are vital to individual and organizational success Effective communication is vital for the success of both large and small businesses Mark Wiskup is also the author of The It Factor and Presentation S.O.S.

Whether you're an executive, manager or small business owner, this book will show you how to improve your communication skills to better your business.

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9780470549643
List price: $21.95
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