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John Bogle puts our obsession with financial success inperspective

Throughout his legendary career, John C. Bogle-founder of theVanguard Mutual Fund Group and creator of the first index mutualfund-has helped investors build wealth the right way and led atireless campaign to restore common sense to the investment world.Along the way, he's seen how destructive an obsession withfinancial success can be. Now, with Enough., he puts thisdilemma in perspective.

Inspired in large measure by the hundreds of lectures Bogle hasdelivered to professional groups and college students in recentyears, Enough. seeks, paraphrasing Kurt Vonnegut, "to poisonour minds with a little humanity." Page by page, Bogle thoughtfullyconsiders what "enough" actually means as it relates to money,business, and life.

Reveals Bogle's unparalleled insights on money and what weshould consider as the true treasures in our lives Details the values we should emulate in our business andprofessional callings Contains thought-provoking life lessons regarding ourindividual roles in society

Written in a straightforward and accessible style, this uniquebook examines what it truly means to have "enough" in worldincreasingly focused on status and score-keeping.

Topics: Wealth, Stock Market, Happiness, Success, and Informative

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9780470441954
List price: $24.95
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Now that he's got his MoreThanEnough, several times over, he wants others to find a moral compass and be satisfied with less. Please!more
This is a good introduction to the Bogle philosophy, but if you are familiar with it already, it gets a little long-winded and preachy.more
I enjoyed John Bogle's take on investing vs. speculating. As a founder of Vanguard and the index fund he's seen it all. In Enough he doesn't waste words or mince them.more
Written by the celebrated founder of The Vanguard Group who is probably the most respected name in the world of investment today, this is an inspiring book that sets us thinking hard about what our goals really should be in life - are we, as individuals, businesses and nations going after the right things; do we know when we have enough; when do we stop our relentless pursuits? This book explains what is fundamentally wrong with our approach towards progress; what got the world into the crisis it is in today.more
Excellent book. Bogle doesn't lose any opportunity to emphasize the need for simplicity in investing, and how costs reduce returns dramatically, when compounded. If someone were to do a value stream mapping of investing, like they do in Lean, it would be pretty obvious how much the financial intermediaries, 'croupies' as he calls them, take value out of the process/returns, and how little they add to it. Most of the ideas are there in his previous books and interviews, but he puts them nicely in the context of "enough" in this book. Good read."more
What is most inspiring about this book is John Bogle's personal example. He has lived the life he espouses, and continues to do so. Through a variety of personal anecdotes and observations about modern times, he explains why we need to return to the basic values of character and thrift. He applies this message to investing, but the book is more social commentary than financial advice. What he does say about investing is exemplified in the approach Vanguard uses. Having studied the economics of personal finance early in his career, Bogle built Vanguard on the principle that investors can't expect to beat the market, especially while paying multiple "croupiers" along the way. The sensible approach is to invest indexes, using the lowest cost means possible. I still hold that someone needs to look for better returns at some point. A poorly managed company will eventually fail and it would be prudent to exit such an investment once that writing is on the wall. Overall, I enjoyed this book for its simple message.more
Read all 7 reviews

Reviews

Now that he's got his MoreThanEnough, several times over, he wants others to find a moral compass and be satisfied with less. Please!more
This is a good introduction to the Bogle philosophy, but if you are familiar with it already, it gets a little long-winded and preachy.more
I enjoyed John Bogle's take on investing vs. speculating. As a founder of Vanguard and the index fund he's seen it all. In Enough he doesn't waste words or mince them.more
Written by the celebrated founder of The Vanguard Group who is probably the most respected name in the world of investment today, this is an inspiring book that sets us thinking hard about what our goals really should be in life - are we, as individuals, businesses and nations going after the right things; do we know when we have enough; when do we stop our relentless pursuits? This book explains what is fundamentally wrong with our approach towards progress; what got the world into the crisis it is in today.more
Excellent book. Bogle doesn't lose any opportunity to emphasize the need for simplicity in investing, and how costs reduce returns dramatically, when compounded. If someone were to do a value stream mapping of investing, like they do in Lean, it would be pretty obvious how much the financial intermediaries, 'croupies' as he calls them, take value out of the process/returns, and how little they add to it. Most of the ideas are there in his previous books and interviews, but he puts them nicely in the context of "enough" in this book. Good read."more
What is most inspiring about this book is John Bogle's personal example. He has lived the life he espouses, and continues to do so. Through a variety of personal anecdotes and observations about modern times, he explains why we need to return to the basic values of character and thrift. He applies this message to investing, but the book is more social commentary than financial advice. What he does say about investing is exemplified in the approach Vanguard uses. Having studied the economics of personal finance early in his career, Bogle built Vanguard on the principle that investors can't expect to beat the market, especially while paying multiple "croupiers" along the way. The sensible approach is to invest indexes, using the lowest cost means possible. I still hold that someone needs to look for better returns at some point. A poorly managed company will eventually fail and it would be prudent to exit such an investment once that writing is on the wall. Overall, I enjoyed this book for its simple message.more
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