Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

A la fin du XIXe siecle, un jeune français, envoyé en mission aux indes, fait la rencontre de Clara, riche héritiere, dont il tombe amoureux. Cette femme, troublante et perverse, lui fait visiter le Jardin des supplices, lieu ou l'art chinois des fleurs côtoie celui de la torture.
Ces pages de crime et de sang sont d'une sensualité assez trouble et trahissent la profonde misogynie de l'auteur. Âmes sensibles s'abstenir...

Published: Booklassic an imprint of PublishDrive on
ISBN: 9789635260294
List price: $0.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Le Jardin des supplices
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
I found this book interesting in its attempt to falsely moralize. This book was clearly intended to titilate, but is uses a patently false moral premise to paint its lurid tale of the beauty of torture and pain. The setting is China, in a time when this was a most exotic and strange part of the world. Westerners visit a prison where Clara is brought to almost orgasmic pleasure by viewing the sufeering of chinese prisoners. It is not really political or moral. That is just the veneer for telling a story of violence with a hint of sadism.more
I like to think I have a pretty thick skin when it comes to books, but this has to be one of the most disturbing books I've ever read. Mirbeau's juxtaposition of pain and flowers, beauty and repulsiveness, love and death, is at the same time beautiful and horrific. The book itself is well written and the story is intriguing: it explores the basest instincts of human beings, and how all of us have a dark, bestial side we either supress or foster (the torture garden section reminded me of the farm in the Sin City comics). I am glad I read this book. I felt that it raised many uncomfortable questions about human nature that people prefer to ignore, but doubt I'll read it again. I would recommend it to anyone interested in human behavior or decadent literature, but it's not for the faint of heart, this one.more
The book is very queer because in place of fear of reverse colonization, Clara and the Weak Boy go to China. Their purpose isn't to colonize it. their purpose to preserve its cruelties. (Mirbeau is fetishizing China of course) The last part of the book reads more like the movie The Exorcist which according to the book is a weekly affair. The strangeness of this book deserves great indepth analysis.more
What concerns basic punctuation and outlook, this edition is not the best one. The Torture Garden is of curiosity value, but I was annoyed by the moralistic overtone and the strict polarity between good and evil the main character felt it was imperative to demonstrate ever so often. Interesting, but telling the story through the mouth of a self-obsessed bourgeois man makes the outcome a bit thin.more
Read all 4 reviews

Reviews

I found this book interesting in its attempt to falsely moralize. This book was clearly intended to titilate, but is uses a patently false moral premise to paint its lurid tale of the beauty of torture and pain. The setting is China, in a time when this was a most exotic and strange part of the world. Westerners visit a prison where Clara is brought to almost orgasmic pleasure by viewing the sufeering of chinese prisoners. It is not really political or moral. That is just the veneer for telling a story of violence with a hint of sadism.more
I like to think I have a pretty thick skin when it comes to books, but this has to be one of the most disturbing books I've ever read. Mirbeau's juxtaposition of pain and flowers, beauty and repulsiveness, love and death, is at the same time beautiful and horrific. The book itself is well written and the story is intriguing: it explores the basest instincts of human beings, and how all of us have a dark, bestial side we either supress or foster (the torture garden section reminded me of the farm in the Sin City comics). I am glad I read this book. I felt that it raised many uncomfortable questions about human nature that people prefer to ignore, but doubt I'll read it again. I would recommend it to anyone interested in human behavior or decadent literature, but it's not for the faint of heart, this one.more
The book is very queer because in place of fear of reverse colonization, Clara and the Weak Boy go to China. Their purpose isn't to colonize it. their purpose to preserve its cruelties. (Mirbeau is fetishizing China of course) The last part of the book reads more like the movie The Exorcist which according to the book is a weekly affair. The strangeness of this book deserves great indepth analysis.more
What concerns basic punctuation and outlook, this edition is not the best one. The Torture Garden is of curiosity value, but I was annoyed by the moralistic overtone and the strict polarity between good and evil the main character felt it was imperative to demonstrate ever so often. Interesting, but telling the story through the mouth of a self-obsessed bourgeois man makes the outcome a bit thin.more
scribd