• book

From the Publisher

This highly accessible introduction to Lisp is suitable both for novices approaching their first programming language and experienced programmers interested in exploring a key tool for artificial intelligence research. The text offers clear, reader-friendly explanations of such essential concepts as cons cell structures, evaluation rules, programs as data, and recursive and applicative programming styles.
The treatment incorporates several innovative instructional devices, such as the use of function boxes in the first two chapters to visually distinguish functions from data, use of evaltrace notation in later chapters to illustrate the operation of evaluation rules, and "Dragon stories" to explain recursion. The book contains nearly 400 diagrams and illustrations, and 77 pages of answers to exercises. Advanced topics and "toolkit" sections, and a variety of complete programs, extend readers' programming power.
Published: Dover Publications on
ISBN: 9780486791708
List price: $34.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Common LISP: A Gentle Introduction to Symbolic Computation
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
2 min read
Psychology

The End of Human Uniqueness, and a New Beginning

Today Nautilus launched its second issue, “Uncertainty: A new look at an indeterminate world.” For now we’ve just opened up the first chapter, “Uncertainty in Nature,” with looks at how uncertainty is embedded in math, particles of matter, our genomes, and possibly space-time itself. The rest of the issue will emerge over the course of the month, with one chapter going up each Thursday; on most days there will also be an uncertainty-related blog post. Together, these pieces will take visitors on a tour through the big thoughts around what can and can’t be known. As uncertainty comes to the for
Money
2 min read
Psychology

Why We Buy Items We Never Wear

IF THIS IS THE YEAR you vow to finally tame your stuff, you’re not alone. According to Statistic Brain, “getting organized” is the second most popular New Year’s resolution (losing weight is No. 1). So you dig into your closet or rummage under the bed, only to find new, unworn clothing and accessories, maybe even with the price tags still attached. Why do so many of us waste money on clothes we don’t wear? If you understand the reasons behind this common consumer impulse, you can stop making purchases that clutter your house while they empty your wallet. WE FORGIVE A MAJOR FLAW The scenario
New York Magazine
2 min read
Psychology

Sucking at Stuff

DAVID MARCHESE THE CLEVELAND INDIANS, Florence Foster Jenkins’s singing career, my attempts to drive stick: three examples of prolonged, profound failure. And yet, in an age when we can so fastidiously craft the public narratives of our perfect lives—who even believes someone’s immaculately curated Instagram account anymore?—I find myself increasingly inclined to talk about these sorts of instances of being bad at stuff. Not only that, but I feel more eager to try new things that I am likely to do very, very badly. For example: stop-motion animation. Despite an utter lack of visual aesthetic