• book

From the Publisher

"Monumental book . . . Mr. Vicat Cole is a born teacher." — Contemporary Review
"Mr. Vicat Cole's ability as a landscape painter is well known, and he unites to his executive talents the qualifications of an accomplished teacher." — Connoisseur
"The name of the author is itself a guarantee that the subject is adequately treated. It is handled in a systematic and lucid way, which the novice . . . can follow with ease." — Studio
For years greatly admired and widely used, this excellent text by one of Britain's foremost art instructors has achieved the status of a classic in its field. The author, also a noted landscape painter, offers complete and accurate instruction in painting and drawing trees to all serious artists — beginner or advanced, amateur or professional. Its extremely comprehensive and detailed coverage has earned this volume a permanent place in the libraries of landscape painters, students, and teachers.
Every aspect of trees and how to depict them — in any style — is covered with unusual clarity and precision; problems of balancing tree groups, relations of light and shade, delicacy and weight, distance, sky apertures and their patterns, curves and straight lines in tree branches, tree color, the influence of special environmental factors (age, frost and snow, wind, moonlight), the effects of bud arrangements on the anatomy of trees, etc. Of special value is the very thorough and lucid analysis of tree anatomy: the proportion of boughs, branches, and twigs; the positioning of leaves on twigs; the form, texture, and color of leaves; leaf patterns; flower arrangement; stipules, bracts, buds, scales, spines, seedlings, the bark, and all the other essential details of structure. Specific information is given for each tree discussed: oaks, sycamores, willows, pines, maples, etc.; abstract and inaccurate generalizations are avoided. Nearly 500 illustrations by the author accompany the text, demonstrating all the anatomical features discussed. In addition, there are 48 full-page plates: magnificent landscape paintings and drawings by Giorgione, Rubens, Rembrandt, Van der Neer, Watteau, Hobbema, Turner, Gainsborough, Dupré, and many others, showing their compositional use of trees, their details in rendering, and similar material.
Published: Dover Publications on
ISBN: 9780486140858
List price: $12.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Artistic Anatomy of Trees
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

NPR
3 min read

Art Is A Matter Of Life And Death In 'The Electric Sublime'

In a time when most types of government spending are under attack, a few brave souls have stepped up to defend those perpetually endangered hillocks of federally funded refinement, the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities. The defenders haven't always managed so well. In a recent New York Times piece, Nicholas Kristof went so far as to argue that the august tradition of human cultural achievement should indeed be sustained because it has helped, somehow, to limit the practice of keeping hens in small cages. "The humanities have even reshaped our diet," he marveled. Kristof is just t
Nautilus
7 min read
Pop Culture

Science Gets Down With Miles Davis and Bernini: Analyzing music and sculpture in the digital age.

This month, in our article, “Literature by the Numbers,” we introduced you to scholars using digital tools to uncover fresh historical and critical insights into fiction, poetry, and plays. To the chagrin of their old-school colleagues, the IBM Watson-era scholars are showing how computer analysis can uncover new meanings in the works of masters like Shakespeare. Digital research, though, doesn’t stop with literature. This week we reached out to scholars in music and sculpture for further insights into how digital tools illuminate art, music, and creativity. Anna Jordanous, research associate
New York Magazine
5 min read

The Art-History Straitjacket

JERRY SALTZ “THE KEEPER” NEW MUSEUM. CLOSES SEPTEMBER 25. THE ART WORLD ENJOYS asking big questions like “Can art change the world?” We usually answer “Yes.” I usually disagree. Art can’t stop famine in sub-Saharan Africa or eradicate Zika. Art, nevertheless, does change the world incrementally and by osmosis, typically by first changing how we see and thereby how we remember. Andy Warhol combined clashing colors that had never been together before, and that palette is now ubiquitous; God creating Adam looks the way Michelangelo painted it; Oscar Wilde said “the mysterious loveliness” of fo